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British Geological Survey

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  • Collection of individually registered specimens and cuttings from onshore boreholes drilled in England and Wales by BGS, commercial and public bodies since the establishment of BGS in 1835. The collection has been developed as part of the BGS responsibility to establish and maintain a National Borehole Collection. The collection is updated on a daily basis by the addition of new data and by the modification of existing data. The collection contains all registered borehole samples for England and Wales, Scottish borehole samples are excluded. Details of the collection are held on the 'Borehole Materials Database', and may be accessed over the internet from the BGS web site.

  • This national dataset brings together sixteen national datasets to create a GIS product that provides the information necessary to determine the extent to which the ground is suitable for infiltration sustainable drainage systems (SuDS). It includes derivations of the following datasets: soluble rocks, landslide hazards, groundwater flooding susceptibility, made ground, shallow mining hazards, geological indicators of flooding, depth to water table, superficial thickness, compressible ground, collapsible ground, swelling clays, running sands, predominant flow mechanism, permeability indices and the Environment Agencys source protection zone dataset. All datasets have been reclassified and reattributed (with text descriptions and a score field indicating the suitability of the ground for infiltration) and feature in the end product both as single entities, but also in derived 'screening' maps that combine numerous datasets.

  • This presentation on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project, North Sea aquifer mapping, was presented at the Cambridge Biannual, 02.04.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-30.

  • This presentation on the EPSRC project, CONTAIN, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 21.04.15. Grant number: EP/K036025/1.

  • The data consists of a presentation presented at the '8th Trondheim Conference on CO2 Capture, Transport and Storage', Trondheim, Norway, 16-18th June 2015. The presentation describes work carried-out on behalf of the 'Fault seal controls on CO2 storage capacity in aquifers' project funded by the UKCCS Research Centre, grant number UKCCSRC-C1-14. The Captain Sandstone saline aquifer has a potential to store large volumes of CO2 as part of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies, however it is known to be affected by regional faults, some of which extend to the seabed. An in situ stress analysis is performed in order to deduce the stresses affecting these faults and to assess their geomechanical stability.

  • The data consists of a poster presented at 'The Geology of Geomechanics' conference, held at Burlington House, London by the Geological Society on 28-29 October, 2015. The poster describes an overview of work carried-out on behalf of the 'Fault seal controls on CO2 storage capacity in aquifers' project funded by the UKCCS Research Centre, grant number UKCCSRC-C1-14. The CO2-rich natural gas accumulations of the Fizzy and Oak fields are examined for their fault-seal potential, in particular accounting for the impact of IFT and contact angle on capillary threshold pressures. Results of an in situ stress study for the Inner Moray Firth is also presented, with results being applied to a geomechanical stability analysis of faults affecting the Captain Sandstone saline aquifer formation.

  • The data consists of an extended abstract submitted to the '8th Trondheim Conference on CO2 Capture, Transport and Storage', Trondheim, Norway, 16-18th June 2015. The abstract describes work carried-out on behalf of the 'Fault seal controls on CO2 storage capacity in aquifers' project funded by the UKCCS Research Centre, grant number UKCCSRC-C1-14. The Captain Sandstone saline aquifer has a potential to store large volumes of CO2 as part of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies, however it is known to be affected by regional faults, some of which extend to the seabed. An in situ stress analysis is performed in order to deduce the stresses affecting these faults and to assess their geomechanical stability.

  • Magnetic time-series from the BGS SWIGS differential magnetometer method (DMM) systems. Funded by NERC, grant number: NE/P017231/1 "Space Weather Impact on Ground-based Systems (SWIGS)". These data consist of measurements of the Earth’s natural magnetic field at the Whiteadder Moor remote site (WHIR) and the natural magnetic field plus the field created by GIC at the Whiteadder Moor underline site (WHIU). The database will include .xyz files with the DMM data and one document with metadata. See Hübert et al. (2020) for further details.

  • The GeoSure datasets and related reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement due to six types of natural geological hazard, in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Collapsible Ground dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to collapse (to subside rapidly) as a consequence of a metastable microfabric in loessic material. Such metastable material is prone to collapse when it is loaded (as by construction of a building, for example) and then saturated by water (as by rising groundwater, for example). Collapse may cause damage to overlying property. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMapGB-50 (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the origin and behaviour of the formations so defined. It provides complete coverage of Great Britain, subject to revision in line with changes in DiGMapGB lithology codes and methodological improvements. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMap (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to compress under an applied load, a characteristic usually of superficial deposits such as peat or alluvium. Some types of ground may contain layers of very soft materials like clay or peat. These may compress if loaded by overlying structures, or if the groundwater level changes, potentially resulting in depression of the ground and disturbance of foundations. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.