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British Geological Survey

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  • The database contains satellite images of the UK purchased by the BGS or on its behalf by NERC. It includes data from the Lansdat, SPOT, Radarsat and ERS satellites. The images are stored in proprietary format on various types of magnetic media. The data are currently stored by path-row scene numbers and as mosaics on tapes, CDs and drives. Entire UK is covered by the dataset, however, there are gaps in coverage from individual sensors. Coverage exists for countries (or parts of countries) where work has been carried out.

  • A 1:250,000 map showing the main geological bedrock divisions in Northern Ireland. The bedrock shown on GeoIndex map comprises the bedrock geology, which represents the outcrops (at surface) and subcrops (at near-surface, beneath superficial deposits) in Northern Ireland. For each rock unit there is a brief generalised description showing the major rock group, rock type and age under the following headings. LEX_D: The name of the selected area. This can be a group, formation or igneous intrusion e.g. dyke. LEX_RCS: Map code as it appears on the published 1:250,000 map. RCS_D: The name of the dominant types of rock (lithologies) in the different areas shown on the map e.g. granite. The names of the rock types given here are often generalisations, appropriate for the large areas of geological coverage at this scale. These areas may include a number of different geological formations whose distribution can only be portrayed on more detailed geological maps. RANK: Identifies formations and groups. Min_Time_D and Max_Tim_D: The age of the rock unit in terms of periods, relatively smaller units of geological time e.g. Carboniferous, Jurassic etc. Some of the map areas include rocks with a range of ages and these are shown as such e.g. Triassic to Cretaceous. The oldest metamorphic rocks are described as Moinian and Dalradian. The rocks range in age from those deposited relatively recently, some 2 million years ago, back to ancient and highly altered Precambrian rocks over 2500 million years old. In broad terms the youngest rocks are found in the south and east of the UK, the oldest in the north and west. VERSION: Version of the data. RELEASED: Date of release/update of the data. CAUTION Because of the generalisation and simplification used in the compilation of this map, it should not be used to determine the detailed geology of any specific sites. It is best used to provide a basic understanding of the geology of the country in general, and for showing the geology of large regions where broad trends are more important than specific details. Persons interested in the detailed geology of particular sites should consult the latest large-scale maps or the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland at:- Geological Survey of Northern Ireland Colby House Stranmillis Court Belfast BT9 5BF

  • Rocks, thin sections and paper registers: samples from past BGS surveys and projects overseas. Though neglected for several years, the collection has been re-opened for addition of new material from overseas projects and donations. Paper registers are arranged by accession order on a country by country basis. The records have not been placed in electronic format and are not currently machine readable.

  • This dataset contains the .tif (Tag Image File Format) scans of all the applied geology maps (otherwise known as thematic or environmental) and sections produced as part of "Geological background for planning and development" and preliminary sand and gravel projects carried out by the British Geological Survey for the Department of the Environment, Scottish Development Department and Scottish Office from 1975 to 1996. The maps and sections cover a number of themes for specific areas relating to the project area within the United Kingdom. Metadata on the maps, sections and project reports are in the associated excel spreadsheet. The geological line work and the methods used to produce the maps are those current at the time of production. Map scales are 1:10 000, 1:25 000 and 1:50 000. The maps have Ordnance Survey map bases and are bounded by the project area. The maps could be used for geological, engineering geological, environmental and resources research, as an information and reference resource and for inclusion in reports and papers. There are no access or usage constraints for BGS staff for BGS purposes. The scans are .tif files and can, therefore, be displayed using any suitable package. The original file size varies between 170 kb to 250 Mb. The dataset is stand-alone.

  • These files contain ground penetrating radar (GPR) data collected from the glacier margins and forelands of Falljökull and of Kvíárjökull, south-east Iceland, between 2012 and 2014. The data were collected using a Sensors and Software PulseEKKO Pro GPR system. For each glacier the data are stored in folders that indicate the month and year in which the surveys were conducted. Each GPR profile has a Sensors and Software GPR (.DT1) file, and associated header (.HD) and GPS (.GPS) files. The .HD files (which can be opened as text files) give the parameters and equipment used for each profile. GPS files are not available for some of the profiles collected on Falljökull in April 2013 (due to damage that occurred to the GPS linked with the PulseEKKO Pro system). For these profiles start, finish, and mid profile positions were recorded using differential GPS, and locations of these profiles are instead given by GIS shapefiles in the relevant folders. These datasets have been used in the publications listed below. Further information relating to the data collection methodology can be found therein. Phillips, Emrys; Everest, Jez; Evans, David J.A.; Finlayson, Andrew; Ewertowski, Marek; Guild, Ailsa; Jones, Lee. 2017 Concentrated, ‘pulsed’ axial glacier flow: structural glaciological evidence from Kvíárjökull in SE Iceland. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 42 (13). 1901-1922. https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.4145 Phillips, Emrys; Finlayson, Andrew; Bradwell, Tom; Everest, Jez; Jones, Lee. 2014 Structural evolution triggers a dynamic reduction in active glacier length during rapid retreat: evidence from Falljökull, SE Iceland. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, 119 (10). 2194-2208. https://doi.org/10.1002/2014JF003165 Phillips, Emrys; Finlayson, Andrew; Jones, Lee. 2013 Fracturing, block-faulting and moulin development associated with progressive collapse and retreat of a polar maritime glacier: Virkisjokul-Falljokull, SE Iceland. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, 118 (3). 1545-1561. https://doi.org/10.1002/jgrf.20116 Flett, Verity; Maurice, Louise; Finlayson, Andrew; Black, Andrew; MacDonald, Alan; Everest, Jez; Kirkbride, Martin. 2017. Meltwater flow through a rapidly deglaciating glacier and foreland catchment system: Virkisjökull, SE Iceland. Hydrology Research, 48 (6). 1666-1681. https://doi.org/10.2166/nh.2017.205

  • The NIGL (NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratories) laboratory records comprise paper output from mass spectrometers, which is retained for 5 years from the date of analysis, and mass spectrometer loading sheets, which are retained indefinitely. NIGL is a comprehensive stable and radiogenic isotope laboratory facility that undertakes environmental, life, archaeological and earth science research, and educates and trains PhD students, in a collaborative research environment.

  • Data include geological logs and charts; letters, minutes & memos; notes; externally written reports; Internal reports; Research Reports; annotated publications, records and reports; and other miscellaneous documentation. Although some of the data go back to the first half of the 20th century (and rarely earlier), the bulk of the data refer to work carried out since about 1960. The data are filed under four subheadings: i. 1:50K sheet files (data relating to BGS mapping projects) for England & Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. ii. Offshore sheet files (data relating to BGS mapping projects) for the UK continental shelf and North Atlantic. iii. Offshore Quadrants (data relating to the hydrocarbons industry) (confidential). iv. Foreign biostratigraphy (in part confidential). v. General Palaeontology, Biostratigraphy & Taxonomy.

  • NIGL (NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratories) is a comprehensive stable and radiogenic isotope laboratory facility that undertakes environmental, life, archaeological and earth science research, and educates and trains PhD students, in a collaborative research environment. This dataset contains a complete record of publications and scientific reports involving NIGL staff, dating from the formation of the group in 1987. The published research is not geographically restricted.

  • Hourly and minute means of the geomagnetic field vector components from observatories around the world from, respectively, 1883 and 1969, to the present day. At present there are about 160 observatories. These data are useful for tracking changes in the magnetic field generated inside and outside the Earth. Data are produced by a number of organisations around the world, including BGS. Data are available in plain text from www.wdc.bgs.ac.uk.

  • The National Seismological Archive (NSA) is the United Kingdom national repository for seismological material. It was created principally to preserve data from seismological observatories in the UK that have now closed. In many cases in the past records have been lost or destroyed when there is no longer anyone to look after them; the NSA provides a permanent home for these historical scientific documents, to preserve them for posterity. The principal collection consists of the seismograms stores from defunct observatories; also bulletins and reports from all over the world dating from the 1890s onwards, held in a variety of media, including earthquake-related newspaper cuttings, glass slides, microfilm, and comprehensive UK earthquake research material collected over a 30 year period. The archive has a public access room available for researchers and welcomes visiting scientists who wish to study material held in it. If it is impractical to visit, we may be able to supply data from it, subject to staff availability. One of the major projects of the archive has been the presentation of current knowledge of UK historical earthquake seismology material in a short series of reports, easily accessible to researchers. These are available for download as Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format files (.pdf) from the NSA download page.