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  • This dataset contains home range size, habitat availability and selection ratio data, calculated from GPS data fixes collected from individual European nightjars, in four concurrent years (2015-2018). Home ranges are 95% areas of use, presented in hectares. Habitat availability data are presented as the percentage (%) of each habitat category (n = 6, pooled from 14 original habitat types) available to each individual within their 95% home range. Selection ratios are Manly Selection Ratios for 14 habitat types and express the extent to which each habitat type is used by each individual bird, compared to how much of it is available. Selection Ratios >1 express positive selection – i.e. used more than expected, given availability. Selection Ratios <1 express avoidance – i.e. used less than expected, given availability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d5cc1b92-6862-4475-8aa1-5936786d12ab

  • This record contains time series observations of land surface-atmosphere exchanges of net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange (NEE), sensible heat (H) and latent heat (LE), and meteorological observations measured at an eroded upland blanket bog peatland (UK-BAL) in the Eastern Cairngorms in Scotland, UK (56.93° N, -3.16° E, 642 m asl). The dataset comprises eddy covariance CO2, water and energy fluxes, originally collected at 20Hz and processed to 30-minute data, as well as accompanying meteorological observations, originally collected at 15 min and processed to 30-minute data. Time period covered in this dataset is 04/07/2018 until 04/11/2020. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a65f6241-bfc3-430a-ae93-ccb7c63c1a53

  • This dataset comprises 18 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, in July 1995 from stations in the north east Atlantic between 45 - 50 N, 5 - 15 W. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the University of Hamburg, Department of Chemistry as part of the Ocean Margin Exchange (OMEX) I project.

  • The dataset comprises 43 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the English Channel, North Sea, Irish Sea and St. George's Channel, and the Bristol Channel areas, specifically from between Liverpool and the Isle of Man and then at various locations around the west, south west and south coasts up to the east of Ipswich. The data was collected during January and February of 2003. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory.

  • This dataset details the paternity of progeny from Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Plants were genotyped at seven microsatellite markers before being introduced across the study site to form experimental arrays. Experimental arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100 hectare replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). Upon maturation approximately 10 seeds were collected from each plant and genotyped. Fragment analysis was conducted and alleles were scored on Genemarker. Seeds were then manually scored as outcrossed or selfed and paternity was determined using Cervus. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7b721c07-bc38-4815-8669-4675867663d0

  • The data set comprises measurements of water temperature, salinity, current velocities and sound velocity, and sediment characteristics. The data were collected in the Clyde Sea in July and August 1997. The bulk of the measurements were made at the acoustic transmission point Tx1 (55 31.6N, 4 49.7W), and at receiving points SW of Tx1 up to 20 km away. In addition a SW-NE section (55 13.5N, 5 9.4W to 55 35.0N, 4 46.3W) was sampled at the beginning and end of the experiment, and a W-E section (5 3.0W to 4 52.7W at 55 31.6N) was run three times during the experiment. The data were collected by the research vessels Prince Madog and Calanus. Throughout the experiment the Prince Madog was used to deploy the acoustic transmission equipment, and as the main oceanographic vessel. The Calanus acted as the receiving ship, and also collected conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiles. Overall, 199 CTD casts, 71 hours of temperature time series data, 150 hours of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data, 70 hours of RoxAnn (sidescan sonar), position and water depth data, and three sediment sound speed profiles were collected. Two CTDs were used onboard the Prince Madog: a Seabird SBE-19 and a Neil Brown Mk. III. A Neil Brown SmartCTD was used on the Calanus. Several casts were made onboard the Madog with both CTDs attached to the same frame for intercalibration purposes. At the bottom of each cast with the Neil Brown Mk. III CTD two SIS digital reversing thermometers were triggered and a seawater sample collected, which was later analysed in the laboratory for salinity. Temperature and salinity data from the Madog CTDs were calibrated using these values. No seawater samples were collected by the Calanus. Data from all CTDs were despiked and spurious density inversions were removed. The majority of the CTD casts were repeat casts at either the acoustic transmission or reception point, the object being to monitor the high frequency variability of the water column, and allow model predictions of the acoustic signal characteristics to be tested against observed signal variations. Whilst the Prince Madog was on station at Tx1 four internally recording temperature sensors were deployed at fixed depths. During some overnight runs a single temperature/depth sensor was also deployed; during transmission experiments this sensor was attached to the acoustic source. The ADCP onboard the Madog was used to record vertical current profiles for most of the experiment. A RoxAnn system onboard the Prince Madog was used during part of the experiment to log ship position, water depth, and the bottom roughness and hardness indices E1 and E2. Three bottom sediment cores were collected on 5/8/97 with a hydroplastic (gravity) corer. Two metre core barrels with an internal diameter of about 8cm were used. The cores each contained between 1m and 1.5m of sediment, and were analysed for sound speed at the University of Wales, Bangor after the cruise. The cores were taken at Tx1 (55.527N, 4.832W), 10 km (55.441N, 4.843W), and 20 km (55.371N, 4.880W) along the primary acoustic track. The precision of the sound speed measurements is +/- 10 m/s. The PROSIM Clyde Sea experiment was primarily an acoustic transmission experiment designed to study shallow water acoustic propagation. The oceanographic data were collected to provide information on the mean and time-varying characteristics of the water column for use in acoustic modelling. PROSIM was undertaken by the Unit for Coastal and Estuarine Studies, a self-funded research unit attached to the School of Ocean Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor. The unit specialises in physical oceanography and ocean modelling. The data are stored at the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC).

  • The data set comprises wave height and period statistics, and sea level measurements collected near Acajutla, El Salvador. Accurate positions are not known and the location of both instruments is approximated as 13 deg 32.0 N, 89 deg 57.0 W. There is no other information available regarding these sites. The data were collected between 1 December 1974 and 30 November 1975 using an Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) frequency modulated (FM) pressure recorder deployed in the harbour at Acajutla and a waverider buoy deployed offshore from the harbour. The IOS FM pressure recorder uses a pressure sensitive diaphragm to vary the gap of a parallel plate capacitor, resulting in a frequency modulation of a nominal 100 KHz carrier signal. This signal is recorded on a shore-based magnetic tape data logger linked to the pressure unit by armoured cable. Data were recorded for ten minutes every three hours and analysed later as described by Hardcastle (1978). Some uncertainty surrounds the ability of the pressure recorder to respond accurately to the surface waves since the transfer function from pressure to surface wave height is incompletely understood. Draper (1957) has derived a factor to correct for the hydrodynamic attenuation of the pressure signal. This factor varies with mean zero up-crossing period and may increase wave heights by up to 15 percent compared with classical wave theory (Fortnum and Hardcastle, 1979). This data set has not been corrected. The waverider buoy generates a heave signal via an internal accelerometer to an accuracy of better than five percent. This signal is used to amplitude modulate a 27-30 MHz radio signal which is transmitted continuously and can be received by the recording device at a range of up to 50 km depending on local conditions (Driver, 1980). The data were collected by Livesey and Henderson (now incorporated with Binnie and Partners, 65 London Rd., Redhill, Surrey, RH1 1LG, UK) and are stored at the British Oceanographic Data Centre.

  • The data are concentrations of different fluvial carbon species (dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and particulate organic carbon) which form part of the lateral transport of carbon from the terrestrial to aquatic system. This influences the terrestrial carbon balance as well as being a key part of the freshwater carbon cycle. The submission also contains hydrological (stage height, discharge and water temperature) and water chemistry data (pH, conductivity and oxygen saturation). The data were collected from Peruvian rainforest streams within the NERC funded Amazonica project (NE/F005482/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/507a5e1f-e056-454c-8ff6-d185f3da8556

  • This dataset contains calculated terrestrial fluxes of methane using static chambers from Stordalen mire, a subarctic peatland (68°20’ N, 19°03’ E) located near Abisko, Northern Sweden . Measurements were carried out during growing season 2013 in three measurement campaigns: 16-27 June (number of sampling occasions, n, = 4), 11-22 August (n=5) and 16-29 September (n=5 for wetland and 4 for birch forest). A total of 60 static chambers were measured, 14 within the birch forest and 46 within the wetland. In addition to fluxes auxiliary measurements such as air and soil temperature, soil moisture and soil nutrients were taken and the vegetation composition was recorded. The data was collected as part of the MAMM project (Methane and other greenhouse gases in the Arctic: Measurements, process studies and Modelling, http://arp.arctic.ac.uk/projects/) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (grant NE/I029293/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0dc1cdab-0f4f-4564-a863-a4b43335a5d7

  • This data set includes longitudinal occurrence of bird species at 36 forest plots – half of which burned during the 2015-16 El Niño drought – distributed across a gradient of prior human disturbance in the Brazilian Amazon. Data was collected in 2010 and 2016 (around 6 years before, and one year after the 2015-16 El Niño, respectively) as part of the projects ‘Assessing ENSO-induced Fire Impacts in tropical Rainforest Ecosystems’ (AFIRE) and ‘Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning in degraded and recovering Amazonian and Atlantic Forests’ (ECOFOR), within the NERC Human-Modified Tropical Forest (HTMF) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4b05caee-a3c8-46a7-b675-e5a94554bd9f