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2019

1053 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 1053
  • This dataset contains calculated terrestrial fluxes of methane using static chambers from Stordalen mire, a subarctic peatland (68°20’ N, 19°03’ E) located near Abisko, Northern Sweden . Measurements were carried out during growing season 2013 in three measurement campaigns: 16-27 June (number of sampling occasions, n, = 4), 11-22 August (n=5) and 16-29 September (n=5 for wetland and 4 for birch forest). A total of 60 static chambers were measured, 14 within the birch forest and 46 within the wetland. In addition to fluxes auxiliary measurements such as air and soil temperature, soil moisture and soil nutrients were taken and the vegetation composition was recorded. The data was collected as part of the MAMM project (Methane and other greenhouse gases in the Arctic: Measurements, process studies and Modelling, http://arp.arctic.ac.uk/projects/) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (grant NE/I029293/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0dc1cdab-0f4f-4564-a863-a4b43335a5d7

  • The dataset consists of the transcripts of expert inputs considering how the conceptual thinking for both ‘smart’ and ‘natural or biophilic’ cities could combine to inform future urban discourses and critically reviewed a set of emerging characteristics that described the interface between these alternative discourses. These inputs include informed practice-based perspectives on themes identified in the literature and comparative assessments, testing the integrating principles identified in the research against business as usual silo approaches, which helped refine the research outcomes. Expert inputs were used to inform the identification of new ways of integrating urban futures discourses, in particular shaping the Smart City – Natural City interface, using Birmingham, UK as a case study. The files include the underlying data provided by a cohort of multi-disciplinary [anonymised] experts who contributed to the research; • the record of the group or table outputs from the Innovation Workshop of 12th September 2017 • copies of photographs of the collective ‘stickies’ contributions at the workshop • the original transcript record of the semi-structured interview conversations • records of Group telephone or meeting conversations • ‘work in progress’ collations of comments received; generated to share with contributors and with co-authors Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/474e090d-4502-432c-b8de-ce9f33571f8e

  • Sequence data from blood samples, taken from a wild population of long-lived birds (mute swans; Cygnus olor) that has experienced three outbreaks of related H5 HPAIVs in the past decade, specifically, H5N1 (2007), H5N8 (2016) and H5N6 (2017). Detailed demographic data were available and intense sampling was conducted before and after the outbreaks. This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in NCBI Genbank at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore with accession numbers MH819084 to MH819175 (inclusive)

  • This dataset contains concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon, nutrients and concentrations of greenhouse gases CO2, CH4 and N2O from nine sites across the River Tay catchment. Water was sampled on a monthly basis between February 2009 and December 2010. The locations of sampling sites were based on existing flow gauging and water sampling sites of the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a61da7da-b7ef-40b7-a324-c3711ef81207

  • This dataset contains prey items of common guillemot Uria aalge and razorbill Alca torda observed during the 2018 breeding season at East Caithness Special Protection Area (SPA), Buchan Ness to Collieston Coast SPA and Isle of May National Nature Reserve, off the east coast of Scotland. Diet of these two species has been studied on the Isle of May since the 1980s (Harris & Wanless 1985, 1986; Wilson et al 2004; Daunt et al. 2008; Thaxter et al 2013). To our knowledge, only two previous studies of diet has been undertaken at Buchan Ness to Collieston Coast SPA (in 2006, 6km to the north of the site used in this study; Anderson et al. 2014; and in 2017, using a similar protocol as in 2018; Daunt et al. 2017), and one previous study of diet has been undertaken at East Caithness SPA (2017; Daunt et al. 2017). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d7164910-17cb-44cd-bccd-6a9c31b6ed70

  • [This dataset is embargoed until December 12, 2021]. This dataset consists of ammonia (NH3) measurements at two sites in a rural location in South Lanarkshire. The sites are located in a dwelling, one site is inside in the hall and the other is outside in the garden area . The garden backs onto grassland which is part of a large dairy farm. The ammonia measurements are taken from a set of UKCEH ALPHA® (Adapted Low-cost Passive High Absorption) samplers from January 2017 to November 2018. Samplers are exposed in monthly cycles at the beginning of each month. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/dd7099e9-4aad-4e02-b31b-512f20628cf6

  • The file contain groundwater level/depth (WL), Groundwater and Surface Water Quality data (EC (micro-siemens per centimetre or µS/cm), Temperature (degrees C) and pH) for 49 points under fortnightly monitoring relevant to Gro for GooD research project in Kwale County, Kenya. Blank - Data not available. Note this is same dataset as NGDC record number 118189 with extended time series. Gro for GooD: Groundwater Risk Management for Growth and Development

  • This dataset measures the abundance of ant species at baited traps set across twelve trees in four experimental plots in lowland, tropical rainforest. Baited traps were set at 5 m vertical intervals from the ground to as high as possible in the canopy, the stratum of each trap location was recorded. At each height two pairs of baited traps were set, each pair contained one trap baited with carbohydrate (honey and oats) and the second with protein (tuna). Traps within each pair were separated by approximately 20cm were left open for 24 hours. All ants collected were identified to morphospecies level and the species abundance in each trap was recorded. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/62bf0251-ca8d-4288-a274-0ff6e39b3a3c

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset consists of 4,397 insect species associated with 679 native plant species, 120 archaeophytes, and 223 neophytes from the Database of Insects and their Food Plants (DBIF). The DBIF details approximately 60,000 interactions between phytophagous insect (and mite) species and plants recorded in Great Britain over the last century, based on a wide variety of sources, including entomological journals and field guides. The data here represents a reduced subset of the full DBIF (13,277 interactions), only including interactions resolved to the species level (insect species x associated with host plant species y), records that have been expertly verified as reliable and included in previous large-scale analyses (Ward 1988; Ward & Spalding 1993; Ward et al. 1995; Ward et al. 2003), and records that are certain to have occurred in Great Britain. Any records originating from captive breeding studies are excluded. Finally, only plants with associated phylogenetic data and native status are included. Host plant distribution size is also included, in addition to a quantification of the distinctiveness of the insect communities found on a subset of the non-native plants. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/cc6b5e83-a1f4-40d6-bbbb-64366b002418

  • The data describe: Genome sequencing of desiccating bdelloid rotifers Population genomics of bdelloid rotifers Comparative genomics of bdelloid rotifers: evaluating the effects of asexuality and desiccation tolerance on genome evolution This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the Environmental Nucleotide Archive