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2019

1058 record(s)
 
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  • This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the UK Data Service ReShare repository. This dataset contains material from work package 4.1 from the IWUN project: ‘A new green paradigm for wellbeing: an integrated approach to GBI (green and blue infrastructure) planning, health and social care’. The qualitative research for this work package took place between late 2017 and mid 2018. The central element of this research was a process of identifying greenspace interventions to improve wellbeing, and engaging stakeholders through a survey, interviews and focus groups to shortlist those interventions considered most practicable in Sheffield. The interviews and focus groups also discussed how such interventions could be implemented, what benefits were associated with them, and the processes involved in deciding whether or not to invest in the chosen actions. The dataset contains (a) anonymised interview and focus group transcripts to identify stakeholder preferences for greenspace interventions to improve wellbeing; (b) anonymised notes from associated public events; (c) notes from a thematic analysis of the interview and focus group material; (d) records of voting preferences from stakeholder groups in selecting possible greenspace interventions. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/N013565/1 as part of the Valuing Nature programme.

  • [This dataset is embargoed until December 12, 2021]. This dataset consists of ammonia (NH3) measurements at two sites in a rural location in South Lanarkshire. The sites are located in a dwelling, one site is inside in the hall and the other is outside in the garden area . The garden backs onto grassland which is part of a large dairy farm. The ammonia measurements are taken from a set of UKCEH ALPHA® (Adapted Low-cost Passive High Absorption) samplers from January 2017 to November 2018. Samplers are exposed in monthly cycles at the beginning of each month. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/dd7099e9-4aad-4e02-b31b-512f20628cf6

  • This dataset consists of ammonia (NH3) measurements from a set of ALPHA (Adapted Low-cost Passive High Absorption) sampler sites at Ballynahone National Nature Reserve, a designated Area of Special Scientific Interest (ASSI), Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and Ramsar (wetland of international importance designated under the Ramsar Convention) site in Northern Ireland. The park is an ammonia sensitive peatland ecosystem managed locally by Ulster Wildlife Trust (UWT). The data were originally collected due to concern that Ballynahone Bog may be adversely affected by NH3 emissions arising from local livestock installations. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9c87edc2-a9be-4d4c-ae86-827bfeecd20c

  • This dataset contains prey items of common guillemot Uria aalge and razorbill Alca torda observed during the 2018 breeding season at East Caithness Special Protection Area (SPA), Buchan Ness to Collieston Coast SPA and Isle of May National Nature Reserve, off the east coast of Scotland. Diet of these two species has been studied on the Isle of May since the 1980s (Harris & Wanless 1985, 1986; Wilson et al 2004; Daunt et al. 2008; Thaxter et al 2013). To our knowledge, only two previous studies of diet has been undertaken at Buchan Ness to Collieston Coast SPA (in 2006, 6km to the north of the site used in this study; Anderson et al. 2014; and in 2017, using a similar protocol as in 2018; Daunt et al. 2017), and one previous study of diet has been undertaken at East Caithness SPA (2017; Daunt et al. 2017). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d7164910-17cb-44cd-bccd-6a9c31b6ed70

  • The data set contains grain size distributions, organic matter (OM) contents and trace metals distribution metal distribution (Fe, Zn, Cu, Cr and Pb) of seven (7) shallow cores of sediments from the Notwane Dam (southern Botswana). The cores have been collected with a push corer using PVC pipes of 5 cm diameter by a team from BIUST led by Dr. Franchi between November 2017 and February 2018. The data were collected as part of the PULA project, which aimed at understanding the immediate effect of heavy rainfall and floods on water resources in arid Botswana and their transitional hydrologic readjustment towards the dry period, and the role of these events in supporting either or both resources replenishment and contamination. Grain size profiles of the cores have been obtained by analyzing wet sediments with a laser diffraction particle size analyzer. The OM content of the sediments was obtained by measuring the loss on ignition (LOI) of bulk sediments after calcination in a muffle furnace. The sediments have been analyzed for trace metal distribution using a Microwave Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometer (MP-AES). The grain size distribution has allowed to pinpoint the presence of flood couplets, characterized by coarse lags followed by fine grained materials. The trace metal distribution profiles have been compared with the flood couplets to assess the entity of metal mobilization during floods and subsequent droughts. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/022b3fff-55d7-46f5-b11f-2f7366e508b0

  • This dataset consists of plant species presence and abundance in different sizes of plots recorded from the first 100 1km squares across Great Britain in 2019, as part of a rolling soil and vegetation monitoring program of 500 1km squares, repeated every 5 years. The UKCEH Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) and predecessors, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way, we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to vegetation data, soil data are also gathered by the current phase of the Countryside Survey. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/fd6ae272-aeb5-4573-8e8a-7ccfae64f506

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset consists of 4,397 insect species associated with 679 native plant species, 120 archaeophytes, and 223 neophytes from the Database of Insects and their Food Plants (DBIF). The DBIF details approximately 60,000 interactions between phytophagous insect (and mite) species and plants recorded in Great Britain over the last century, based on a wide variety of sources, including entomological journals and field guides. The data here represents a reduced subset of the full DBIF (13,277 interactions), only including interactions resolved to the species level (insect species x associated with host plant species y), records that have been expertly verified as reliable and included in previous large-scale analyses (Ward 1988; Ward & Spalding 1993; Ward et al. 1995; Ward et al. 2003), and records that are certain to have occurred in Great Britain. Any records originating from captive breeding studies are excluded. Finally, only plants with associated phylogenetic data and native status are included. Host plant distribution size is also included, in addition to a quantification of the distinctiveness of the insect communities found on a subset of the non-native plants. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/cc6b5e83-a1f4-40d6-bbbb-64366b002418

  • These data were collected from surface sediments (0-5 cm) at sites located along the Athens Riviera and Salamina coastline, Greece. The sediments came from both oil-contaminated (via Agia Zoni II oil-spill) and uncontaminated sites and were first collected between September 2017 and April 2018. For sediments taken at each site, data includes hydrocarbon concentrations (alkanes and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)), absolute microbial abundance (by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR)) of Bacteria, Archaea, and Fungi, and 16S rRNA amplicon libraries of Bacteria and Archaea. Additionally, nutrient concentrations (ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, and phosphate) were measured from seawater samples taken at the same sites. This study was conducted by the University of Essex, in partnerships with Archipelagos Institute of Marine Conservation and Cranfield University, and funded by the National Environmental Research Council and EnvEast DTP. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/acf464dc-be75-41b8-9688-f2ba4037ef53

  • This dataset contains the number and fork length of Aphanius fasciatus and Gambusia holbrooki individuals caught in traps within pools and channels in Akrotiri SBA, Cyprus between 26th February 2018 and 19th March 2019. Fish were collected from submerged and semi-submerged traps within six pools and three channels within the lake approximately every two weeks before being measured, sexed as obvious males and then released. Traps were deployed for 24 hours before data were collected. Water temperature, dissolved oxygen and conductivity were also measured. Data were collected as part of a Defra Darwin Initiative Plus project to ascertain baseline data on native and non-native fish populations in the Sovereign Base Area of Akrotiri. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ad7068c3-5225-437a-ae58-8422cb7e3454

  • This code uses pathway modelling to look at correlations of exotic plant invasion in tropical rainforest remnants and continuous sites. Partial least squares path-modelling looks at correlations between latent variables that are informed by measured variables. The code examines the relative influence of landscape-level fragmentation, local forest disturbance, propagule pressure, soil characteristics and native community composition on invasion. The total native community is examined first. Then subsets of the native community are modelled separately, adult trees, tree saplings, tree seedlings and ground vegetation. The relationship between the native and exotic communities was tested in both directions. Full details about this application can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/adbf6d29-ee7b-4dd1-9730-11d2308d526c