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54 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 54
  • Laboratory results for the analysis of soil samples collected from urban areas during the baseline geochemical mapping programme of Britain. Sample sites are described on field slips. Chemical results are subjected to high level of quality control in the laboratory. Results are the raw data processed (standardisation and normalisation) to give seamless geochemical images and the value added G-BASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) data in the BGS geochemistry database.

  • The G-BASE programme involves systematic sampling and the determination of chemical elements in samples of stream sediment, stream water and soil, to build up a picture of the surface chemistry of the UK. The average sample density for stream sediments and water is about one site per 1.5-2km square, and for soils one site per 2km square. Analytical precision is high with strict quality control to ensure countrywide consistency. Results have been standardised to ensure seamless joins between geochemical sampling campaigns. The data provide baseline information on the natural abundances of elements, against which anomalous values due to such factors as mineralisation and industrial contamination may be compared. Analytical data for the 150 microns fraction of soil and stream sediment samples are available for some or all of: Ag, As, B, Ba, Bi, Be, Ca, Ce, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Th, Ti, U, V, Y, Zn, and Zr. Most water samples have been analysed for alkalinity, pH, conductivity, F and U and some for multi-element analyses including Al, Cl, Na, Si, SO4,NO4, and TOC. The project now routinely determines the elements listed in the <2mm fraction of surface soils.

  • This file documents the sulphur isotope data, and the manner in which it has been processed, to supply the reference data for isotope domains of the Isotope biosphere domains GB (V1) map. It includes a summary of the analytical methods used to determine the isotope ratios though time.

  • Collection of annual publications from the global network of magnetic observatories. They typically contain tabulations of hourly, monthly and annual mean values of the geomagnetic elements. Contains all magnetic observatory year books held by the World Data Centre for Geomagnetism (Edinburgh).

  • This dataset contains tabulated production, consumption and trade data on minerals in the UK together with authoritative commentary on current developments in the minerals industry. Data are supplied from official sources, companies and trade associations. Where data cannot be acquired, estimates are given. In addition to UK (country) data, statistics are also given at planning region level and, for certain minerals, at county level. Units of measurements are tonnes, kilograms or carats, according to commodity. Value is also provided for imports and exports. The information will be of value to all those interested in Britain's minerals. The data captured by BGS spans from 1973 onwards and is updated annually.

  • In 2011 the British Geological Survey (BGS) decided to begin the assembly of a National Geological Model (NGM) from its existing and on-going geological framework models , comprising integrated national crustal, bedrock and Quaternary models. The bedrock component is the most advanced of these themes and comprises both the calculated models and a complementary network of cross-sections that provide a fence diagram for the bedrock geology of Great Britain. This fence diagram, the GB3D_v2012 dataset is available in a variety of formats from the BGS website www.bgs.ac.uk as free downloads. It complements the existing 1:625 000 scale mapsheets published by BGS utilising the same colour schema and geological classification. The 121 component cross-sections extend to depths between 1.5 and 6 km; they have an aggregate length of over 20,000 km, and they are snapped together at their intersections to ensure total consistency. The sections are based on the existing BGS geological framework models where they cut through them, they also take account of the vast wealth of published data on the subsurface structure of Britain both from BGS and in the literature. Much of this is in the form of cross-sections, contour maps of surfaces, and thicknesses (isopachs). The fence diagram has been built in the Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3D (GSI3D) software. It is envisaged that this dataset will form a useful educational resource for geoscience students and the general public, and also provide the bedrock geology context and structure for regional and catchment scale studies. The fence diagram was built in 2009-12 using funding from the BGS National Capability Programme and the Environment Agency of England and Wales. 14 expert regional geologists compiled the sections.

  • The British Geological Survey has one of the largest databases in the world on the production and trade of minerals. The dataset contains annual production statistics by mass for more than 70 mineral commodities covering the majority of economically important and internationally-traded minerals, metals and mineral-based materials. For each commodity the annual production statistics are recorded for individual countries, grouped by continent. Import and export statistics are also available for years up to 2002. Maintenance of the database is funded by the Science Budget and output is used by government, private industry and others in support of policy, economic analysis and commercial strategy. As far as possible the production data are compiled from primary, official sources. Quality assurance is maintained by participation in such groups as the International Consultative Group on Non-ferrous Metal Statistics. Individual commodity and country tables are available for sale on request.

  • The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. GeoSure Basic is a single, combined GeoSure model, containing only the highest score of all the GeoSure layers. The model has been re-classified to negligible - very low, low and moderate - high. The methodology is based on the 6 GeoSure individual hazard Assessments. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • Laboratory results for the analysis of geochemical samples (stream sediments, soil and water) collected for the high resolution geochemical mapping of mainland Britain. The programme of regional geochemical sampling began in 1968 in the northern Highlands of Scotland. Sample sites are described on field slips. Chemical results are subjected to high level of quality control in the laboratory. Results are the raw data processed (standardisation and normalisation) to give seamless geochemical images and the value added G-BASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment ) data in the BGS geochemistry database.

  • This dataset provides linear trends, over varying time periods, for the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS) Collated Indices of individual butterfly species across the UK. The main statistical values derived from a linear regression (slope, standard error, P-value) are presented for the entire time series for each species (1976 to 2011), for the last 20 years, and for the last decade. In addition a trend class, based on slope direction and its significance, and a percentage change for that time period are provided to describe the statistical trends. These trend data are provided for 59 UK butterfly species. Trends across different time series allow us to determine the long and short-term trends for individual species. This is enables us to focus conservation and research and also to assess species responses to conservation already in place. The Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) and Butterfly Conservation (BC) are responsible for the calculation and interpretation of this trend datasets. The collection of the underlying UKBMS data is reliant on a large volunteer community. The UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme is funded by a consortium of organisations led by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). This dataset is updated annually and a more recent version of the UKBMS species trends (2012) is now available. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/cad2af6c-0c97-414c-8d5f-992741b283cf