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From 1 - 10 / 13775
  • This dataset contains prey items of common guillemot Uria aalge and razorbill Alca torda observed during the 2018 breeding season at East Caithness Special Protection Area (SPA), Buchan Ness to Collieston Coast SPA and Isle of May National Nature Reserve, off the east coast of Scotland. Diet of these two species has been studied on the Isle of May since the 1980s (Harris & Wanless 1985, 1986; Wilson et al 2004; Daunt et al. 2008; Thaxter et al 2013). To our knowledge, only two previous studies of diet has been undertaken at Buchan Ness to Collieston Coast SPA (in 2006, 6km to the north of the site used in this study; Anderson et al. 2014; and in 2017, using a similar protocol as in 2018; Daunt et al. 2017), and one previous study of diet has been undertaken at East Caithness SPA (2017; Daunt et al. 2017). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d7164910-17cb-44cd-bccd-6a9c31b6ed70

  • This dataset shows both the micro-scale mechanisms and acoustic response involved in shear failure of a deforming porous rock. To our knowledge, this is the first such dataset to combine simultaneous acoustic measurements and x-ray tomography imaging. It comprises a time-series of 3D in-situ synchrotron x-ray microtomography (µCT) volumes showing a Clashach sandstone sample (CL10) undergoing triaxial deformation to failure under a constant acoustic emissions (AE) event rate. Use of a constant AE event rate slowed down the failure process after peak stress, enabling shear failure to be captured in unprecedented spatio-temporal detail by the µCT volumes. These volumes are accompanied by the local incremental 3D strain fields and simultaneously acquired waveforms from acoustic emissions and ultrasonic velocity surveys, as well as mechanical bulk stress and strain. These data are fully explained in Cartwright-Taylor et al. Seismic events miss important grain-scale mechanisms governed by kinematics during shear failure of porous rock, in review at Nature Communications. We also include an equivalent time-series of the same data types showing a second Clashach sandstone sample (CL04) undergoing triaxial deformation to failure, this time under a constant strain rate where failure happened abruptly, shortly after peak stress. Both collections were acquired in-situ on the beamline I12-JEEP at the Diamond Light Source, Didcot, UK, in September 2019. Each 3D µCT volume of the sample is contained in a .zip file labelled with the sequential scan number. Each volume comprises reconstructed 16-bit grey-scale data in a sequence of 2D image files (.tif), each numbered according to the depth at which it lies within the sample volume. The file dimensions are pixels, with an edge length of 7.91 µm. Two further .zip files contain the incremental 3D volumetric and deviatoric strain fields, obtained from digital volume correlation between neighbouring µCT volumes. Each strain field consists of a 32-bit 3D image file (.tif) in pixels with an edge length of 316.4 µm, labelled with its scan increment. Also included are (i) .csv files, containing the mechanical stress and strain time-series, the time and mechanical data at which each µCT volume was scanned, and the acoustic emissions event rate data, and (ii) .zip files containing times and waveforms for the acoustic emissions and ultrasonic velocity surveys as .ascii files. The .zip and .xlsx files are labelled with the sample name, the data type (grey-scale, strain-volumetric, strain-deviatoric, seismic, mechanical, mechCT, eventrateAE) and the sequential scan number (grey-scale only) according to the following convention: sample_datatype_scan#. We acknowledge Diamond Light Source for time on beamline I12-JEEP under proposal MG22517. This work is supported by the UK's Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) through the CATFAIL project NE/R001693/1 Catastrophic failure: what controls precursory localisation in rocks?

  • The World Magnetic Model (WMM), produced jointly with the US National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's National Geophysical Data Center, is the standard model in UK Ministry of Defence and US Department of Defense navigation and attitude reference systems and is also used widely in civilian navigation systems. The model is also used on marine and aviation charts and is revised every five years.

  • The palaeointensity (PINT) database of estimates of absolute palaeomagnetic field strength throughout Earth history. The aim of the PINT database is to catalogue all absolute palaeointensity data with ages > 50 ka which have been published in the peer-reviewed literature. The data is provided at the cooling unit level or, in the case of large intrusions, at the sampling site level. In some cases, the data provided in the publication only allows averages of multiple cooling units to be given. In such cases, this should be a Field. The database was published in Bono et al. (2021, https://doi.org/10.1093/gji/ggab490) and an online version is available at http://pintdb.org/

  • [This dataset is embargoed until September 1, 2023]. This dataset contains information about hourly temperature variation, phenotypic and genetic change, and change in environmental parameters in a two-year mesocosm study designed to tease apart the impact that phenotypic plasticity and genetic diversity have on rate of adaptation to experimental heatwaves. All data were collected between 2017 and 2019. Thermal data was collected continuously using data loggers. The frequency of natural heatwaves was manipulated using a programmable aquatic mesocosm facility using data collected from real heatwaves from 2006. Phenotypic evolution was tracked using intermittent common garden life-history studies while changes in clone frequency were determined using microsatellite markers to track changes in clone frequency in manipulated populations over two years. Experimental data on zooplankton community dynamics were monitored using intermittent depth integrated sampling of communities in each mesocosm over two years. The work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council (Grant NE/N016017/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2ae5e8d3-be36-4517-b80c-c6b91792b769

  • HystLab (Hysteresis Loop analysis box), is MATLAB based software for the advanced processing and analysis of magnetic hysteresis data. Hysteresis loops are one of the most ubiquitous rock magnetic measurements and with the growing need for high resolution analyses of ever larger datasets, there is a need to rapidly, consistently, and accurately process and analyze these data. HystLab is an easy to use graphical interface that is compatible with a wide range of software platforms. The software can read a wide range of data formats and rapidly process the data. It includes functionality to re-center loops, correction for drift, and perform a range of slope saturation corrections.

  • Terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) and CT scan data collected during flume experiments on a gravel bed. TLS data show the bed surface topography before and after waterworking of the bed. CT scan data show the 3D structure of sections of the river bed after waterworking. Some CT data has been processed to segment the images into the individual gravel grains, and for some of these data a database of grain properties is also available. Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6749d033-cdf4-479b-ba85-015c3dbb476a

  • A set of historical tide gauge sea level records from Alicante (Spanish Mediterranean coast) have been recovered from logbooks stored at the Spanish National Geographical Institute (IGN). Sea level measurements have been digitised, quality-controlled and merged into two consistent sea level time series. Vertical references among instruments benchmarks have been derived from high precision vertical levelling surveys. Earlier observations are daily averages and more recent data are hourly values. The observations are from 7 different tide gauge records in Alicante outer harbour (Alicante I) and five tide gauge series in Alicante inner harbour (Alicante II). The sea level record in Alicante starts in 1870 with daily averaged values until the 1920s and hourly afterwards, and is still in operation, thus representing the longest tide gauge sea level time series in the Mediterranean Sea. The sea level at Alicante I has been measured by tide pole, floating gauge, mechanical recorder, digital recorder and since 2014 by radar gauge. The sea level at Alicante II has been measured by floating gauge, digital recorder and from 2014 onwards by radar gauge. This scarcity of long-term sea-level observations, as well as their uneven geographical distribution is a major challenge for climate studies that address, for example, the quantification of mean sea-level rise at centennial time scales, the accurate assessment of sea-level acceleration or the long-term changes in sea-level extremes that are vital for coastal risk assessments. This dataset represents an additional effort of sea-level data archaeology and aims at preserving the historical scientific heritage that has been up to now stored in old archives in non-electronic format. The research was partially funded by the Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities. A further series was rescued from Santander under the same initiative.

  • This datasets contains 323 observations of borehole breakouts across and drilling induced tensile fractures from borehole imaging used to re-characterise the UK stress field orientation in 2016. This was published in the Journal of Marine and Petroleum Geology and is openly available using doi:10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2016.02.012 The observations relate to 39 wells from Central England, Northern England and Northern Scotland and are provided with links to screen grabs of the images for clarity. The basic well metadata is supplied along with a description of the dataset. The Images were generated in the IMAGE DISPLAY module of the Landmark RECALL software and are supplied on an “as shown” basis. Descriptions of the tools and the techniques used are listed in the accompanying paper: KINGDON, A., FELLGETT, M. W. & WILLIAMS, J. D. O. 2016. Use of borehole imaging to improve understanding of the in-situ stress orientation of Central and Northern England and its implications for unconventional hydrocarbon resources. Marine and Petroleum Geology, 73, 1-20.

  • The dataset comprises 41 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the North Sea area specifically the stratified region Oyster Ground, during September and October of 2003. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory.