Topic

 

economy

24 record(s)

 

Type of resources

Keywords

Topics

Contact for the resource

Provided by

Years

Formats

Representation types

Update frequencies

Resolution

Regions

GEMET keywords

From 1 - 10 / 24
  • Data comprise causal diagrams which show links between aspects that influence the well-being of rural inhabitants (e.g. good quality of food, good family relationships, education, etc) with ecosystem services (e.g. food from trees, wood sticks for construction, firewood, wood for charcoal production, etc.) and their causes (e.g. change in land use) in rural Mozambique. Information was gathered at 20 workshops held in Maputo, Xai Xai, Lichinga, Quelimane, and at village level in the districts of Mabalane, Marrupa and Gurue in 2014 and 2015. The objective of the workshops was to examine aspects that influence well-being and their causes in the miombo woodland area of rural Mozambique. One of the objectives of the project was to construct Bayesian belief networks (BBNs) to model future land use change scenarios in rural Mozambique using a participatory approach, to evaluate the consequences of deforestation in the well-being of the rural population. The data were collected as part of the Abrupt Changes in Ecosystem Services and Wellbeing in Mozambican Woodlands (ACES) project and were funded by the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme, funded by NERC, the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Department for International Development (DfID), the three are government organizations from UK. The project was led by the University of Edinburgh, with the collaboration of the Universidad Mondlane, the IIED, and other organizations. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/14622c4b-8bd4-4624-8ea6-35da7da211cd

  • Dataset of 195 surveys with micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) in sub-Saharan Africa that explore their their experiences of urban flooding (Nairobi, Kenya, n=60), water supply disruption (Gaborone, Botswana, n=57) and disruption to electricity supplies from hydroelectric load shedding (Lusaka, Zambia, n=78) during the 2015/2016 El Niño. The surveys were conducted in August 2016 in Lusaka, in September 2016 in Nairobi, and in November 2016 in Gaborone. This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the UK Data Service.

  • Data comprise scenarios of how land use can be in the future and how will it affect ecosystem services in rural Mozambique. The scenarios were constructed from information gathered at five workshops held in Maputo, Xai Xai, Quelimane and Lichinga in 2014 and 2015. The objective of the workshops was to examine aspects that influence well-being (e.g. ecosystem services) and their causes (e.g. change in land use) in the Miombo woodland area of rural Mozambique and identify actions that could contribute to poverty alleviation and biodiversity conservation. The final objective was to construct scenarios of how the land use can be in Mozambique in the future (2035). The data were collected as part of the Abrupt Changes in Ecosystem Services and Wellbeing in Mozambican Woodlands (ACES) project and were funded by the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme, funded by NERC, the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Department for International Development (DfID), the three are government organizations from UK. The project was led by the University of Edinburgh, with the collaboration of the Universidad Mondlane, the IIED, and other organizations. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/97c65c35-1db5-49d5-8ee0-ae5c7b699634

  • This dataset contains the transcripts of interviews and discussion groups from seven villages in the Mabalane district, Gaza province, Mozambique. The seven villages were selected from a forest degradation gradient running from villages with abundant undisturbed forest areas to those with degraded forests, mainly driven by charcoal production. The villages had similar infrastructure, soils, rainfall, and vegetation types. The dataset contains information on seasonality, how availability and use of products from the forest has changed over time (trend analysis), wealth ranking within the villages and differences between wealth statuses, and profiles/characteristics of each village. Interviews were conducted with groups in each village or the leader of the village, between May and September 2014. Data were collected as part of a project funded under the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/49a70237-c579-4669-b126-3f23d494aba6

  • This dataset contains the transcripts of interviews on the current structure of the main charcoal supply chains from seven villages in the Mabalane district of Gaza province to Maputo, Mozambique. The seven villages were at different stages of the charcoal production process within similar soils, rainfall, and vegetation types. Semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with key informants (e.g. village leaders, charcoal producers, wholesalers, truck drivers and forest officers), from May to October 2014. Data were collected as part of a project funded under the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/56bae7ce-4798-41a4-b702-2f847952f7ae

  • This dataset contains the transcripts of interviews and discussion groups on the current soya production from ten villages in the Gurue district, Zambezia province, Mozambique. The ten villages were selected from different stages of a land scarcity gradient running from villages with abundant land to those with intense land constraints, mainly driven by expanding agricultural activities and population density. The villages had similar infrastructure, soils, rainfall, and vegetation types. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted with village small-scale soya producers, emergent soya farmers, managers of commercial soya producing operations, district officer, technicians of NGOs, formal and informal traders between July and December 2015. Data were collected as part of a project funded under the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/18c8cbf3-ed55-4065-b52b-b2a4c2ffdf1c

  • This dataset contains the transcripts of interviews and discussion groups from ten villages in the Gurue district, Zambezia province, Mozambique. The ten villages were selected from a land scarcity gradient running from villages with abundant land to those with intense land constraints, mainly driven by expanding agricultural activities and population density. The villages had similar infrastructure, soils, rainfall, and vegetation types. The dataset contains information on participatory mapping of the village characteristics, seasonality, how agricultural activity has changed over time (trend analysis), wealth ranking within the villages and differences between wealth statuses, and profiles/characteristics of each village. Interviews were conducted with groups in each village or the leader of the village, between July and December 2015. Data were collected as part of a project funded under the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f82f7ad8-0e98-41cb-951e-be64ffd36078

  • Data comprise site information (site identifier, name, location, zone of interest, land use type, altitude, slope, topographic position and age of deforest and fallow) and historical information from local people in the Ankeniheny Zahamena forest corridor, Madagascar. Data were collected as part of a project funded by the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme under work package 4 P4GES project, grant references: NE/K008692/1, NE/K010115/1, and NE/K010220-1. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5771191f-8c12-40bf-af62-2624876616de

  • Data comprise records of percent vegetation cover using a category known as the Braun-Blanquet scale from a survey of indicator vegetation species carried out in the Ankeniheny Zahamena forest corridor in Madagascar. In addition, scientific name, local name, family name and life form (fern, shrub, herb, grass, vine or tree) of vegetation was recorded. Data were collected as part of a project funded by the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme under work package 4 P4GES project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b31330cc-743c-431e-95cd-68b316efed0b

  • These data consist of information on economic, social, demographic, cultural, and treatment seeking behaviour collected from former and current human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) patients in Eastern Zambia between 2004 and 2014. There are two data sets. The first dataset consists information on the economic and social impact of HAT. Information on demographics, culture, and treatment seeking behaviour was also collected. Data for this dataset were collected through structured questionnaires administered to patients themselves or their close relatives (care giver). The questionnaires were developed and delivered by experienced researchers from the University of Zambia. The data have been anonymised by removing the names of villages where the patients lived. In total, 64 cases were included in the study. Verbal consent was obtained prior to commencing all questionnaires. The second dataset consists of anonymised transcripts of focus group discussions conducted with health workers, people who have suffered from HAT and their relatives or friends. Seven to ten people were included per discussion group, providing information on concepts, perceptions and ideas relating to the social consequences of HAT. A total of eight focus group discussions were conducted during the study. Focus group discussion data were analysed using inductive approaches and thematic coding carried out by two independent researchers. All transcripts were anonymised and personal identifiers were removed to protect patients' individual data. Verbal consent was obtained prior to commencing all interviews. Focus group interviews were carried out by experienced researchers from the University of Zambia. The data were collected to determine the economic and social consequences of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in Eastern Zambia. This research was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC), and these data contributed to the research carried out by the consortium. The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6f70d562-8fcf-4ecd-adaf-cbc5800cc326