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society

6 record(s)

 

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  • The data set contains the qualitative results from fieldwork from the ‘sense of place’ and 'contemporary social representations' workpackage components of the WetlandLIFE project. Fieldwork included two discussant focus groups and thirty semi-structured interviews with specialist users of wetlands. The University of Brighton's social science qualitative fieldwork seeks to capture the different perspectives of people whose lives are intimately connected to particular English wetlands, in order to understand the range and diversity of wellbeing practices in these spaces. The target cohort are those groups of people, or organisations, that are particularly drawn to wetlands, or who could be expected to make regular use of these spaces, particularly for their health and wellbeing. Such Specialist Interest Groups (SIGs) would include birders, walkers, wildlife photographers, artists and anglers alongside educators, naturalists, spiritual practitioners and ecologists. They may not live close to the wetland sites but their field of interest, or sense of place, would be expected to include them. These interviews and focus groups took place at the case study sites in the Somerset Levels (Westhay Moor and Shapwick Heath), Bedfordshire (Priory Country Park and Millennium Country Park) and North Lincolnshire (Alkborough Flats) between January 2018 and September 2018. This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in the UK Data Service ReShare repository.

  • This dataset contains gridded human population with a spatial resolution of 1 km x 1 km for the UK based on Census 2011 and Land Cover Map 2015 input data. Data on population distribution for the United Kingdom is available from statistical offices in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland and provided to the public e.g. via the Office for National Statistics (ONS). Population data is typically provided in tabular form or, based on a range of different geographical units, in file types for geographical information systems (GIS), for instance as ESRI Shapefiles. The geographical units reflect administrative boundaries at different levels of detail, from Devolved Administration to Output Areas (OA), wards or intermediate geographies. While the presentation of data on the level of these geographical units is useful for statistical purposes, accounting for spatial variability for instance of environmental determinants of public health requires a more spatially homogeneous population distribution. For this purpose, the dataset presented here combines 2011 UK Census population data on Output Area level with Land Cover Map 2015 land-use classes 'urban' and 'suburban' to create a consistent and comprehensive gridded population data product at 1 km x 1 km spatial resolution. The mapping product is based on British National Grid (OSGB36 datum). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0995e94d-6d42-40c1-8ed4-5090d82471e1

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset contains gridded population with a spatial resolution of 1 km x 1 km for the UK based on Census 2011 and Land Cover Map 2007 input data. Data on population distribution for the United Kingdom is available from statistical offices in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and Scotland and provided to the public e.g. via the Office for National Statistics (ONS). Population data is typically provided in tabular form or, based on a range of different geographical units, in file types for geographical information systems (GIS), for instance as ESRI Shapefiles. The geographical units reflect administrative boundaries at different levels of detail, from Devolved Administration to Output Areas (OA), wards or intermediate geographies . While the presentation of data on the level of these geographical units is useful for statistical purposes, accounting for spatial variability for instance of environmental determinants of public health requires a more spatially homogeneous population distribution. For this purpose, the dataset presented here combines 2011 UK Census population data on Output Area level with Land Cover Map 2007 land-use classes 'urban' and 'suburban' to create a consistent and comprehensive gridded population data product at 1 km x 1 km spatial resolution. The mapping product is based on British National Grid (OSGB36 datum). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/61f10c74-8c2c-4637-a274-5fa9b2e5ce44

  • This dataset includes the transcript of discussion group activities on Human Wildlife conflict, conducted with ten rural communities in Marrupa District, Niassa (Northern Mozambique). It also comprises the results of semi-structured interviews conducted individually in three of the ten selected communities. The ten villages were selected from a forest cover gradient running from villages with a higher forest cover to those within degraded forest areas and consequently low cover. The villages had similar infrastructure, soils, rainfall, and vegetation types. The dataset contains information on the occurrence of conflict with both vertebrate and invertebrate wild species, mitigation strategies, conflict seasonality and trends, but also its impact on agricultural production and livestock rearing. The discussion groups were conducted with six to ten people and the presence of the leader of each village, between May and July 2015. Data were collected as part of a project funded under the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7bd2e230-c219-4017-9914-b5cfd83a4eae

  • This dataset contains the results of 211 household surveys conducted in Mambwe District, Zambia, as part of a wider study looking at human and animal trypanosomiasis and changing settlement patterns in the area. The interviews were conducted from June 2013 to August 2013. The objective of the survey was to set the health of people and their animals in the context of overall household wellbeing, assets and access to resources. The topics covered included household demographics, human and animal health, access to and use of medical and veterinary services, livestock and dog demographics, livestock production, human and animal contacts with wildlife, crop and especially cotton production, migration, access to water and fuel use, household assets and poverty, resilience and values. The dataset has been anonymised by removing names of respondents, Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) location of their homes and names of interviewers. Household numbers were retained. Written consent was obtained prior to commencing all interviews. This research was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC), and these data contributed to the research carried out by the consortium. The research was funded by NERC with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b1647138-49f5-4777-a39d-e7359bf7b98d

  • The data describe the ecological responses (invertebrate diversity and biomass, plant diversity, soil characteristics and microbial diversity) to experimental manipulation of floristic diversity and vegetation height in planted urban meadows. The experiment consisted of a replicated set of nine different perennial meadow treatments, sown in six public urban greenspaces in the towns of Bedford and Luton, in the UK. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d0741544-cdf3-497d-996b-e30b4b7373c1