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2016

273 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 273
  • 1. Grids (in spreadsheet form) of interpreted parameters from the 3D time-lapse seismics (temporal and constructed depth thicknesses) at the Sleipner CO2 storage operation in the North Sea. 2. A synthetic seismic model of a CO2 wedge, to examine the relationship between wedge true thickness and temporal thicknesses. These datasets underpin following publications: Chadwick, R.A., Williams, G.A. & White, J.C. 2016. High resolution imaging and characterisation of a CO2 layer at the Sleipner CO2 Storage operation using time-lapse seismics. First Break, 34, 79-87. The source data comprise the Sleipner 3D time-lapse surveys which were acquired in 1994 (baseline), 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2010. The dataset used here for measuring temporal thicknesses is the 2010 high resolution dataset with constructed depth thicknesses from the 1994 baseline data. Grant number: EP/K035878/1.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:50 000 scale. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Superficial deposits are the youngest geological deposits formed during the most recent period of geological time, the Quaternary, which extends back about 2.58 million years from the present. They lie on top of older deposits or rocks referred to as bedrock. Superficial deposits were laid down by various natural processes such as action by ice, water, wind and weathering. As such, the deposits are denoted by their BGS Lexicon name, which classifies them on the basis of mode of origin (lithogenesis) with names such as, 'glacial deposits', 'river terrace deposits' or 'blown sand'; or on the basis of their composition such as 'peat'. Most of these superficial deposits are unconsolidated sediments such as gravel, sand, silt and clay. The digital data includes attribution to identify each deposit type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volume 4). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • Data identifies landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with type of artificial or man-made ground. It indicates areas where the ground surface has been significantly modified by human activity. Types of artificial ground include: Disturbed ground areas of ill-defined shallow or near surface mineral workings where distinction cannot be made between made and worked ground. Infilled ground areas where original geology has been removed and then wholly or partially back filled includes waste or landfill sites. Landscaped ground areas where surface has been reshaped includes former sand and gravel workings for recreation and amenity use. Made ground man made features including embankments and spoil heaps. Worked ground areas where ground has been removed including quarries and road cuttings. Disturbed ground areas of ill-defined shallow or near surface mineral workings where distinction cannot be made between made and worked ground. Whilst artificial ground may not be considered as part of the 'real geology' of bedrock and superficial deposits it does affect them. Artificial ground impacts on the near surface ground conditions which are important to human activities and economic development. Due to the constantly changing nature of land use and re-use/redevelopment, caution must be exercised when using this data as it represents a snapshot in time rather than an evolving picture hence the data may become dated very rapidly. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry data, part of a suite of 51 elements using aqua regia ICP-MS techniques at ALS Minerals (Ireland).

  • GIS versions of a regional structural summary and palaeogeographic reconstructions describing the Palaeozoic geology of parts of the UK offshore and onshore, plus a set of summary posters and a summary presentation capturing the conventional petroleum systems. Devonian and Carboniferous rocks are the focus in and around the Mid North Sea High, Central North Sea, the Moray Firth and Orcadian Basin. In the greater Irish Sea area, Carboniferous rocks are described. The peer-reviewed products were produced for the 21CXRM Palaeozoic Project by BGS for DECC/OGA, Oil and Gas UK and oil company sponsors between November 2014 and May 2016, to improve regional digital datasets and knowledge of the underexplored Palaeozoic petroleum systems, and to stimulate exploration. The petroleum systems analysis was based on new interpretations of extensive well, seismic, gravity-magnetic and source rock datasets, integrated with petrophysical studies, basin modelling and UK onshore knowledge. Released data were collated and interpreted, and interpretations of unreleased data were included with agreement of the data owners. Unreleased raw data is excluded, as is the UK Government Seismic data released in 2016. The GIS layers were digitised from figures prepared for project reports and are applicable for use at scales between 1:1,000,000 and 1:3,000,000.

  • Revised full proposal for scientific drilling (852-CPP2) 'GlaciStore: Understanding Pleistocene glaciation and basin processes and their impact on fluid migration pathways (North Sea)', submitted to Integrated Ocean Discovery Programme (IODP) April 2016. The proponent 'GlaciStore' consortium comprises research and industry organisations from the UK, Norway, USA and Canada. The full proposal describes the relationship of the proposed research with the IODP science plan, sets the regional background and describes and illustrates three scientific objectives. The objectives are to: establish a high-resolution depositional and chronological framework defining multiple cycles of glacial advance and retreat over the last 2.6 Ma by investigating the strata preserved in the centre of the NSB by scientific drilling, sampling and detailed analysis; investigate how the temporal variations in depositional environment and geochemistry of the different stratigraphic units have affected the pore fluids (dissolved gases, salts and isotopes) and the microbial community; determine the measurable impact on geomechanical properties of strata (porosity, rock stiffness, in-situ stresses, pore pressure, fractures) caused by cycles of glacial loading and unloading. The drilling and sampling strategy, standard drilling and logging operations and the specialist measurements expected to be taken are described. Related initiatives and wider context of the proposed research also the initial and planned strategy for support from industry and government are outlined. The lead submitter, on behalf to the GlaciStore consortium is Heather Stewart, British Geological Survey (BGS).The 32 proponents from the UK and Norway (BGS, Institute for Energy Technology, Lundin Norway AS, Memorial University of Newfoundland, SINTEF Energy Research, Statoil ASA, University of Bergen, University of Edinburgh University of Oslo, University of Texas at Austin and University of Ottowa) and their expertise are listed and detailed. Site forms for each of the 13 proposed drilling sites are included.The full proposal is a pdf format file. This is restricted to the proponents for publication and to progress to a revised full proposal accepted for drilling by IODP. UKCCSRC Grant UKCCSRC-C1-30.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:50 000 scale. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Data are supplied as five themes: bedrock, superficial deposits, mass movement, artificial ground and linear features. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Superficial deposits are younger geological deposits formed during the most recent geological time; the Quaternary. These deposits rest on older rocks or deposits referred to as bedrock. The superficial deposits theme defines landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with a geological name and their deposit-type or lithological composition. Mass movement describes areas where deposits have moved down slope under gravity to form landslips. These landslips can affect bedrock, superficial or artificial ground. Mass movement deposits are described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme Volume 4. However this data also includes foundered strata, where ground has collapsed due to subsidence (this is not described in the Rock Classification Scheme). Caution should be exercised with this data; historically BGS has not always recorded mass movement events and due to the dynamic nature of occurrence significant changes may have occurred since the data was released. Artificial (man-made) theme (shown as polygons) indicates areas where the ground surface has been significantly modified by human activity. Whilst artificial ground may not be considered as part of the 'real geology' of bedrock and superficial deposits it does affect them. Artificial ground impacts on the near surface ground conditions which are important to human activities and economic development. Due to the constantly changing nature of land use and re-use/redevelopment, caution must be exercised when using this data as it represents a snapshot in time rather than an evolving picture hence the data may become dated very rapidly. Linear features (shown as polylines) represent geological structural features e.g. faults, folds or landforms e.g. buried channels, glacial drainage channels at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Linear features are associated most closely with the bedrock theme either as an intrinsic part of it for example marine bands or affecting it in the case of faults. Landform elements are associated with both bedrock and superficial deposits. All five data themes are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • The data consist of several spreadsheets detailing the temporal and geographical distributions of testudinates (turtles, terrapins and tortoises) through time. Occurrence data includes information on taxonomy, geographical distribution and geological age and is limited to Mesozoic-Paleogene taxa. These data were compiled from the published literature on fossil turtles for NERC Standard Grant NE/J020613/1. These data form the basis for understanding the role of changing global climates and geography on testudinate diversity and distribution though time, with the aim of providing historical baseline data for modern conservation biology. The data represent a summary over 150 years of published research on fossil turtles and their relatives and were compiled over a period of 3.5 years during the tenure of a grant. To date they have provided the data used in analyses presented by Nicholson et al. (2015, 2016) and Waterson et al. (2016). Details of the analyses and the results obtained can be found in these papers.

  • Linear features (shown as polylines) represent six classes of geological structural features e.g. faults, folds or landforms e.g. buried channels, glacial drainage channels at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Linear features are associated most closely with the bedrock theme either as an intrinsic part of it for example marine bands or affecting it in the case of faults. However landform elements are associated with both bedrock and superficial deposits. The linear features are organised into seven main categories: Alteration area indicating zones of change to the pre-existing rocks due to the application of heat and pressure that can occur round structural features such as faults and dykes. Fault where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by a large scale process affecting the earth's crust. Fold where strata are bent or deformed resulting from changes or movement of the earth's surface creating heat and pressure to reshape and transform the original horizontal strata. Folds appear on all scales, in all rock types and from a variety of causes. Fossil horizons where prolific fossil assemblages occur and can be used to help establish the order in which deposits were laid down (stratigraphy). These horizons allow correlation where sediments of the same age look completely different due to variations in depositional environment. Mineral vein where concentrations of crystallised mineral occur within a rock, they are closely associated with faulting, but may occur independently. Landforms define the landscape by its surface form; these include glacial features such as drumlins, eskers and ice margins. Rock identifies key (marker) beds, recognised as showing distinct physical characteristics or fossil content. Examples include coal seams, gypsum beds and marine bands. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • Due to differential loading of ice on Britain and Ireland the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) response and therefore sea-level record will vary with distance from the centre of the British Irish Ice Sheet. GIA models are tested against geological observations, however there is a paucity of observations below -10m depth and the lateglacial period when the BIIS retreated leading to a rapid response of both sea-level and GIA. The aim of the project was to use geophysical data, ground truthed by core material, to find evidence of lateglacial sea-level minima in the Irish and Celtic Sea to refine these GIA models. Cruise log and digital copies of the core information (location, water depth, core length) taken onboard the research cruise CE12008 on the RV Celtic Explorer. A GeoReseource 6m vibrocorer was used to collect sediment samples. Cores where taken at multiple sites and from southern and eastern Ireland: Bantry Bay, Dunmanus Bay, Waterford,Offshore County Louth and Dundalk Bay, offshore Isle of Man; offshore Wales: Cardingan Bay; and offshore Northern Ireland: Kilkeel and Dundrum Bay, Belfast Lough.