Creation year

2016

603 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Available actions
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Scale
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 603
  • This dataset consists of autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration fluxes from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration fluxes (CO2) were monitored during summer in 2013 and 2014 in Yukon and Northwest Territories. Monitored sites included peatland plateaus, unburnt and burnt black spruce forests, and additional sites. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/061ba64c-d581-409b-b5af-009e5cabf0ce

  • Data from two small streams, two rivers and rainfall fractions in the Western Amazonian basin at Tambopata National Reserve in Madre de Dios region, Peru. Data presented are nutrients (calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, total soluble phosphorus and silica) and fluvial carbon - dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its isotopic composition δ13C-DIC, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC). Samples were collected during the period from February 2011 to May 2012 targeting both wet and dry seasons. Samples for DIC samples were collected using pre-acidified evacuated Exetainers. Established standard methods were used to take samples for DOC and nutrients. Established standard methods were used to analyse samples for DIC, DOC and nutrients These methods are outlined in the lineage. The samples were taken to understand the hydrological controls on the carbon concentrations and fluxes during different flow conditions. The data collection was carried out as part of the Natural Environment Research Council funded Amazonica project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ee1b9eb7-6fbd-4dd5-8f8f-e07d32c057e4

  • This dataset contains logged and manual observations of groundwater levels for piezometers at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) River Lambourn Observatory wetlands at Boxford, Berkshire, for the period February 1 2012 to January 16 2015 (01/02/2012 to 16/01/2015). The CEH River Lambourn Observatory located in Berkshire, UK (51.445o N 1.384o W) comprises c. 10 ha of riparian wetland which is bordered to the east by a 600 m stretch of the River Lambourn. The subsurface architecture comprises bedrock Chalk, overlain by gravels and then peat. Also presented are datums and ground levels for each piezometer, with data available for groundwater levels in peat, gravels and chalk. Groundwater heads were routinely checked at all piezometers by manually dipping observed water levels. At selected piezometers groundwater heads were monitored every 15 minutes using pressure transducers. Piezometers were not anchored to bedrock, though piezometer datum movement due to peat compressibility with saturation was discounted after comparisons of level surveys. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f4b8ca09-31a7-4f20-9fc1-eb35744e28d6

  • Collated indices are a relative measure of butterfly abundance across monitored sites in the UK, calculated from data collected by the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS). Collated indices are calculated annually for each individual butterfly species that has been recorded on five or more sites in that year. Based on this criterion collated indices have been calculated for the entire UKBMS time series from 1976 to the current year for the majority of species. For some rarer species the time series starts in a later year due to lack of data. Collated indices are calculated using a statistical model that accounts for missing data. The number of sites for each species ranges from 5 to several hundred and varies from year to year. Since 2008 more than 1,000 sites have been monitored across the UK each year. Collated indices are calculated so that we can determine how butterfly populations are changing over time across the UK. This data can be used, for example, to determine where to target conservation efforts and to measure the condition of the UK countryside. Butterflies are recognised as important indicators of biodiversity and environmental change (e.g. as official UK Biodiversity Indicators), and have been used in numerous research studies to understand the impacts of changes in climate and the extent and condition of habitats. Although the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) and Butterfly Conservation (BC) are responsible for the calculation and interpretation of the Collated indices, the collection of the data used in their creation is ultimately reliant on a large volunteer community. The UKBMS is funded by a consortium of organisations led by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). This dataset is updated annually and more recent versions of the UKBMS collated indices are available. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/009334d6-ee33-43fc-a259-bf4d92fb69dc

  • Fifteen minute river stage height for 6 river monitoring stations within the Conwy catchment, North Wales are presented for the period 2013 to 2016. At one site (Cwm Llanerch) site the water temperature was also sampled. At all sites, the mean water height in millimetres (mm) is measured using a pressure transducer installed at an arbitrary level and recorded onto data loggers every 15 minutes. The data were collected to estimate flow in the 6 rivers. The data was collected by CEH staff members for the NERC project "The Multi-Scale Response of Water quality, Biodiversity and C Sequestration to Coupled Macronutrient Cycling from Source to Sea" (NE/J011991/1). Note: there are gaps in this data set due to equipment/battery or system failures. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/79de7b6e-93c2-45d3-b11d-de156dc4fefc

  • A modelled dataset derived from a range of national datasets, describing the distribution of woody linear feature boundaries in Great Britain. The dataset presents linear features which have a high likelihood of being a woody linear feature. The dataset was created by a predictive model developed at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Lancaster in 2016. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d7da6cb9-104b-4dbc-b709-c1f7ba94fb16

  • The data set includes the results of a laboratory analysis in 2016, investigating the presence of trypanosomes and prevalence of tsetse endosymbionts in tsetse flies. The tsetse flies were sampled in Hurungwe District, Mashonaland West Province, Zimbabwe, from February 2014 to November 2014. Flies were sampled using a combination of Epsilon traps and fly rounds, both established techniques for sampling tsetse. Tsetse were stored prior to laboratory analysis using Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques in 2016. The data include two species of tsetse, Glossina pallidipes and Glossina morsitans morsitans. Trypanosome species investigated include Trypanosoma brucei s.l., T. b. rhodesiense, T. vivax, T. congolense, T. simiae, T.simiae (Tsavo) and T. godfreyi. Endosymbionts included in the study were Sodalis glossinidius and Wolbachia spp. Hurungwe District is the only sleeping sickness focus in Zimbabwe and an increase in cases had been detected in years preceding this study. The objective of the study was to investigate the trypanosome species present in the tsetse population and their association with tsetse endosymbionts. This study was conducted as part of research into the relationship between trypanosomiasis, well-being and ecosystems by the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC). The research was funded by NERC with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1e435dd3-ed93-4961-a136-ffa477731e1c

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset contains soil hydraulic measurement data from the Climoor field site in the Clocaenog forest, in North Wales. The collection contains five data sets. 1) soil bulk density (0-5 centimetre) and saturated water content. 2) Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity measured in the field at tensions of -2 and -6 centimetre using a mini disk infiltrometer. 3) Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity measured using a HYPROP (registered trademark) instrument, an instrument which determines the hydraulic properties of soil samples, on soil cores taken from the field plots. 4) Soil water release curves for wet soil corresponding to the hydraulic conductivity measurements made using a HYPROP in the laboratory on cores from the field. 5) Soil water release curve data for dry soil measured using a WP4 potentiometer. The dataset has been quality checked, and incorrect or missing values removed, data has not been infilled and not available (NA's) have been added where there is no data. Data was collected between the end of 2010 and early 2012. Data sets 1, 3 and 4 were collected in April and September, 2011, data set 2 in May, 2012 and data set 5 in November, 2010. The Climoor field experiment intends to answer questions regarding the effects of warming and drought on ecosystem processes. The reported data were collected to monitor site specific soil properties at a specific reference time. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ae7a60ac-b72d-41f5-a42c-c648769cd403

  • The dataset comprises the erosion rate (percent mass loss per hour) observed in sediment cores (16 centimetre (cm) diameter, 30cm height) subjected to flume tank flow for three 'waterfall' flows (Low, medium, high). Sampling was conducted at six salt marsh sites at four spatial scales: 1 m (the minimal sampling unit) nested within a hierarchy of increasing scales of 1-10 metre (m), 10-100 m and 100-1000 m. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England. The Morecambe Bay samples were taken during the winter and summer of 2013. The Essex samples were taken during the winter, early spring and summer of 2013. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7e3b5549-881f-47ea-b003-08542bf6193e

  • The data consists of nitrogen (N) offtake, N emissions and soil N parameters, and herbage quality parameters from a three-cut silage plot trial located at two grassland sites within the UK collected between April and October 2016. The sites were Rothamsted Research at North Wyke in Devon and Bangor University at Henfaes Research Station in North Wales. At each site measurements were taken from 16 plots, organised within a randomised complete block design. Fertiliser was applied three times and three cuts were performed, all parameters measured were following a fertiliser application. Nitrogen parameters measured were crude protein (CP) of herbage, ammonia (NH3) emissions, nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, and soil ammonium (NH4) and nitrate (NO3). Herbage quality parameters measured were dry matter, acid-digestible fibre (ADF), ash, CP, metabolizable energy (ME), and non-digestible fibre (NDF) and digestibility (D) was calculated. Nitrogen offtake, losses and fluxes were measured to determine the N use efficiency and the economic viability of different N fertilisers. Measurements were undertaken by members of staff from Bangor University, School of Environment, Natural Resources & Geography and Rothamsted Research, Sustainable Agricultural Sciences – North Wyke. Data was collected for the Newton Fund project "UK-China Virtual Joint Centre for Improved Nitrogen Agronomy". Funded by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and NERC - Ref BB/N013468/1 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4c7d4b3c-88f7-43ab-a50f-b6804474e568