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  • These spatial layers contain risk factors and overall risk scores, representing relative risk of Phytophthora infection (Phytophthora ramorum and P. kernoviae), for heathland fragments across Scotland. Risk factors include climate suitability, proximity to road and river networks and suitability of habitat for key hosts of Phytophthora and were broadly concurrent with the period between 2007 and 2013. This research was funded by the Scottish Government under research contract CR/2008/55, 'Study of the epidemiology of Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae in managed gardens and heathlands in Scotland' and involved collaborators from St Andrews University, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA), Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), Forestry Commission, the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8f09b7e6-6daa-4823-b338-4edad8de1461

  • Waterlines have been extracted to delimit the edge of the Hunga Tonga - Hunga Ha'apai island between April 2017 and April 2022. Waterline is defined as the instantaneous land - water boundary at the time of the imaging process. Waterlines have been generated by BGS - Earth Observation team through a thresholding-based classification based on Sentinel-2 multispectral imagery and developed on Google Earth Engine. Specifically, the thresholding has been applied to the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) has been derived as a basis to discriminate between the land and sea based on their spectral characteristics. Changes in waterlines over volcanic islands can provide key information to understand volcanic processes. For more info on the methodology, see Novellino et al. (2020) https://doi.org/10.3390/app10020536

  • Tsunami trimlines identified across different islands of the Tonga archipelago. Trimlines have been used as a reference land feature following the January 2022 Tonga tsunami event that ripped off vegetation and built-up areas. Trimlines are distinctive limits between an area with sand coverage, vegetation destruction, and soil erosion on the one hand, and the unaffected natural vegetation on the other. This distinction provides a good landmark to map the inundation width and the landward extension of tsunami runup. In this case, the trimlines have been manually delineated by BGS - Earth Observation team using different high-resolution satellite datasets both optical (KompSat, Planet, Pleiades, WorldView) and radar (TerraSAR-X). Trimlines are well known from task-force publications documenting recent tsunami detection efforts and provide key information to support tsunami triggering mechanism models. For more info, see https://www.usgs.gov/media/images/tsunami-terms and Scheffers et al. (2012), https://doi.org/10.1007/s11069-010-9691-6

  • This dataset models positive plant habitat condition indicators across Great Britain (GB). This data provides a metric of plant diversity weighted by the species that you would expect and desire to have in a particular habitat type so indicates habitat condition. In each Countryside Survey 2007 area vegetation plot the number of positive plant habitat indicators (taken from a list created from Common Standards Monitoring Guidance and consultation with the Botanical society of the British Isles (BSBI)) for the habitat type in which the plot is located are counted. This count is then divided by the possible indicators for that habitat type (and multiplied by 100) to get a percentage value. This is extrapolated to 1km squares across GB using a generalised additive mixed model. Co-variables used in the model are Broad Habitat (the dominant broad habitat of the 1km square), air temperature, nitrogen deposition, sulphur deposition, precipitation and whether the plot is located in a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) (presence or absence data). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/cc5ae9b1-43a0-475e-9157-a9b7fccb24e7

  • This dataset for the UK, Jersey and Guernsey contains the Corine Land Cover (CLC) revised for 2006. This shapefile has been created from combining the 2006 land cover layers from the individual CLC database files for the UK, Jersey and Guernsey. CLC is a dataset produced within the frame of the Initial Operations of the Copernicus programme (the European Earth monitoring programme previously known as GMES) on land monitoring. CLC provides consistent information on land cover and land cover changes across Europe. This inventory was initiated in 1985 (initial year 1990) and then established a time series of land cover information with updates in 2000 and 2006 the last one being the 2012 reference year. CLC products are based on the analysis of satellite images by national teams of participating countries - the EEA member and cooperating countries - following a standard methodology and nomenclature with the following base parameters: * 44 classes in the hierarchical three level Corine nomenclature; * Minimum mapping unit (MMU) for status layers is 25 hectares; * Minimum width of linear elements is 100 metres; The resulting national land cover inventories are further integrated into a seamless land cover map of Europe. Land cover and land use (LCLU) information is important not only for land change research, but also more broadly for the monitoring of environmental change, policy support, the creation of environmental indicators and reporting. CLC datasets provide important datasets supporting the implementation of key priority areas of the Environment Action Programmes of the European Union as protecting ecosystems, halting the loss of biological diversity, tracking the impacts of climate change, assessing developments in agriculture and implementing the EU Water Framework Directive, among others. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2d0cf17f-aabd-4be6-859b-55c3403bbd9a

  • This dataset consists of change data for areas of Broad Habitats across Great Britain between 1990 and 1998. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from up to 569 1km squares and scaling up to a national level. The data are summarized as percentage increase or decrease in habitat area per Land Class (areas of similar environmental characteristics) and are in a vector format. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB and using the 'ITE Land Classification' as a method of stratification. The data were collected as part of Countryside Survey, a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The Survey has been carried out at regular intervals since 1978 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. In addition to habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2bfdede9-8008-4ba3-ac8e-af4e6ab9888b

  • This dataset is the Corine Land Cover (CLC) change map between 2012 and 2018, consisting of 44 classes in the hierarchical three level Corine nomenclature. The Corine land cover changes between 2012 and 2018 for the UK, Isle of Man, Jersey and Guernsey dataset forms part of the Corine Land Cover Maps collection and is produced within the frame of the Copernicus programme on land monitoring. Corine Land Cover (CLC) provides consistent information on land cover and land cover changes across Europe; this change map is the UK component of the European coverage. This inventory was initiated in 1985 (reference year 1990) and established a time series of land cover information with updates in 2000, 2006 and 2012 being the last iteration. CLC products are based on photointerpretation of satellite images by national teams of participating countries – the EEA member and cooperating countries – following a standard methodology and nomenclature with the following base parameters: 44 classes in the hierarchical three level Corine nomenclature; minimum mapping unit (MMU) of status layers is 25 hectares; minimum width of linear elements is 100 metres; minimum mapping unit (MMU) for Land Cover Changes (LCC) for the change layers is 5 hectares. The resulting national land cover inventories are further integrated into a seamless land cover map of Europe. Land cover and land use (LCLU) information is important not only for land change research, but also more broadly for the monitoring of environmental change, policy support, the creation of environmental indicators and reporting. CLC datasets provide important datasets supporting the implementation of key priority areas of the Environment Action Programmes of the European Union as protecting ecosystems, halting the loss of biological diversity, tracking the impacts of climate change, assessing developments in agriculture and implementing the EU Water Framework Directive, among others. More information about the Corine Land Cover (CLC) and Copernicus land monitoring data in general can be found at http://land.copernicus.eu/. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/027b6432-f44d-41ab-b349-89fae673d5f5

  • This dataset consists of the vector version of the Land Cover Map 2000 for Great Britain, containing individual parcels of land cover (the highest available resolution). Level 2 & Level 3 attributes are available. Level 2, the standard level of detail, provides 26 LCM2000 target or ('sub') classes. This is the most widely used version of the dataset. Level 3 gives higher class detail. However, the quality of this level of detail may vary in different areas of the country, requiring expert interpretation. The dataset is part of a series of data products produced by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology known as LCM2000. LCM2000 is a parcel-based thematic classification of satellite image data covering the entire United Kingdom. The map updates and upgrades the Land Cover Map of Great Britain (LCMGB) 1990. Like the earlier 1990 products, LCM2000 is derived from a computer classification of satellite scenes obtained mainly from Landsat, IRS and SPOT sensors and also incorporates information derived from other ancillary datasets. LCM2000 was classified using a nomenclature corresponding to the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) Broad Habitats, which encompasses the entire range of UK habitats. In addition, it recorded further detail where possible. The series of LCM2000 products includes vector and raster formats, with a number of different versions containing varying levels of detail and at different spatial resolutions. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b79e887e-a2a7-4224-8fd7-e78066b950b3

  • These spatial layers contain the predicted occurrence and abundance of three heathland shrubs, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Vaccinium myrtillus and Vaccinium vitis-idaea identified as susceptible host species for Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae in Scotland. The distribution models were developed from quadrat vegetation data kindly provided by Scottish Natural Heritage combined with data on climate and soil conditions as well as deer abundance and were fitted using a Bayesian Generalised Mixed Modelling approach adapted for input data on the DOMIN scale. This research was funded by the Scottish Government under research contract CR/2008/55, 'Study of the epidemiology of Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae in managed gardens and heathlands in Scotland' and involved collaborators from St Andrews University, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA), Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), Forestry Commission, the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5749df3d-000c-445e-a37f-dc0763b4d5ec

  • Erosion risk mapping showing river channel concentrations modelled using SCIMAP for the Yorkshire River Derwent, UK. Scenario mapping has been carried out and the dataset includes the following scenarios to assess variation in model output: 1) traditional land use map; 2) satellite derived land use maps; 3) long term rainfall averages; 4) integrating the artificial drainage network and 5) incorporating future climate change. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/331dd8ca-a4ff-40e6-b753-1b68468d8996