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35 record(s)

 

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  • This dataset consists of change data for areas of Broad Habitats across Great Britain between 1990 and 1998. The data are national estimates generated by analysing the sample data from up to 569 1km squares and scaling up to a national level. The data are summarized as percentage increase or decrease in habitat area per Land Class (areas of similar environmental characteristics) and are in a vector format. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB and using the 'ITE Land Classification' as a method of stratification. The data were collected as part of Countryside Survey, a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The Survey has been carried out at regular intervals since 1978 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. In addition to habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2bfdede9-8008-4ba3-ac8e-af4e6ab9888b

  • This dataset is a characterisation of the soil and rocks and the potential bulking factor (likely excavated volume increases) at Formation (local to regional) level for Great Britain. The data is categorised into Class, characteristics of similar soils and rocks and Bulking Factor, range or ranges of % bulking. The excavation of rocks or soils is usually accompanied by a change in volume. This change in volume is referred to as ‘bulking’ and the measure of the change is the ‘bulking factor’. The bulking factor is used to estimate the likely excavated volumes that will need to be moved, stored on site, or removed from site. It is envisaged that the 'Engineering Properties: Bulking of soils and rocks' dataset will be of use to companies involved in the estimation of the volume of excavated material for civil engineering operations. These operations may include, but are not limited to, resource estimation, transportation, storage, disposal and the use of excavated materials as engineered fill. It forms part of the DiGMap Plus dataset series of GIS layers which describe the engineering properties of materials from the base of pedological soil down to c. 3m depth (ie the uppermost c.2m of geology). These deposits display a variable degree of weathering, but still exhibit core engineering characteristics relating to their lithologies.

  • These spatial layers contain the predicted occurrence and abundance of three heathland shrubs, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Vaccinium myrtillus and Vaccinium vitis-idaea identified as susceptible host species for Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae in Scotland. The distribution models were developed from quadrat vegetation data kindly provided by Scottish Natural Heritage combined with data on climate and soil conditions as well as deer abundance and were fitted using a Bayesian Generalised Mixed Modelling approach adapted for input data on the DOMIN scale. This research was funded by the Scottish Government under research contract CR/2008/55, 'Study of the epidemiology of Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae in managed gardens and heathlands in Scotland' and involved collaborators from St Andrews University, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA), Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), Forestry Commission, the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5749df3d-000c-445e-a37f-dc0763b4d5ec

  • This dataset consists of the vector version of the Land Cover Map 2000 for Great Britain, containing individual parcels of land cover (the highest available resolution). Level 2 & Level 3 attributes are available. Level 2, the standard level of detail, provides 26 LCM2000 target or ('sub') classes. This is the most widely used version of the dataset. Level 3 gives higher class detail. However, the quality of this level of detail may vary in different areas of the country, requiring expert interpretation. The dataset is part of a series of data products produced by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology known as LCM2000. LCM2000 is a parcel-based thematic classification of satellite image data covering the entire United Kingdom. The map updates and upgrades the Land Cover Map of Great Britain (LCMGB) 1990. Like the earlier 1990 products, LCM2000 is derived from a computer classification of satellite scenes obtained mainly from Landsat, IRS and SPOT sensors and also incorporates information derived from other ancillary datasets. LCM2000 was classified using a nomenclature corresponding to the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) Broad Habitats, which encompasses the entire range of UK habitats. In addition, it recorded further detail where possible. The series of LCM2000 products includes vector and raster formats, with a number of different versions containing varying levels of detail and at different spatial resolutions. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b79e887e-a2a7-4224-8fd7-e78066b950b3

  • An updated map of peat extent for Wales has been developed by the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, with support from the British Geological Survey and Natural Resources Wales in support of the Glastir Monitoring & Evaluation Programme, commissioned by the Welsh Government. This map represents a considerable advance on previous attempts to map the deep peat resource of Wales and yields a significantly larger estimate than that based on the Soil Survey of England and Wales alone. This new map highlights the wide distribution of peatlands across much of Wales, with large areas of upland blanket bog in North east and North-central Wales (Migneint, Berwyn) and central Wales (Cambrian Mountains), as well as smaller areas of upland peat in and around the Brecon Beacons National Park. The new unified map also provides a much more detailed picture of the distribution of deep peat in the lowlands, many areas of which retain significant biodiversity interest. The Glastir Monitoring & Evaluation Programme was set up by the Welsh Government in 2013 to monitor the effects of the Glastir agri-environment scheme on the environment and ran from 2013 to 2016. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/58139ce6-63f9-4444-9f77-fc7b5dcc00d8

  • This dataset is part of Integrated Hydrometric Units (IHU) of the UK. Hydrometric Areas are used to organise river flow measurement and hydrometric data collection in the UK. Hydrometric Areas are either integral river catchments having one or more outlets to the sea or tidal estuary, or they may include several contiguous river catchments having topographical similarity but separate tidal outlets. In mainland Britain they are numbered from 1 to 97 in clockwise order around the coast commencing in north east Scotland. The larger islands and groups of islands are numbered from 100-108. Ireland has a unified numbering system from 1 to 40 commencing with the River Foyle catchment and circulating clockwise; not all Irish Hydrometric Areas, however, have an outlet to the coast. Only those Hydrometric Areas covering Great Britain and Northern Ireland are included in this dataset. The boundaries between hydrometric areas correspond to catchment boundaries as digitally-derived from CEH Integrated Hydrological Digital Terrain Model (IHDTM) using a catchment definition program. It should be noticed that the Northern Ireland data are clipped to its political boundary so not every Hydrometric Area in this region is completely represented. The naming and numbering convention for the hydrometric areas in Great Britain was originally defined by the Inland Water Survey Committee (and first published in the Surface Water Year-Book of Great Britain 1936-37). For Northern Ireland the system was developed by a multi-agency working group in the 1970s (and first published in Surface Water: United Kingdom 1971-73. Note that full citations of those two publications are provided as additional information source. This dataset represent the same entities as the IHU Hydrometric Areas of the UK without Coastline, however, the outer boundaries of the units follow coastline published by the Ordnance Survey (Meridian 2), rather than the boundaries of the CEH Integrated Hydrological Digital Terrain Model. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1957166d-7523-44f4-b279-aa5314163237

  • This dataset comprises forest stand and species occurrence data for a selection of non-native species collected in the UK Sovereign Base Areas (SBA) of Cyprus in October 2015 and March 2017, with a particular focus on the area surrounding Lake Akrotiri in the Western SBA. The main focus for mapping was stands of Acacia saligna, Casuarina cunninghamiana, the eucalypts Eucalyptus camaldulensis and E. gomphocephala, and the forb Symphyotrichum squamatum. The typical accuracy of data capture was around 10-15 m precision, varying according to the presence of forest canopy. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7c84e06d-bb1a-4aac-b1d7-33c11310d8a0

  • These spatial layers contain risk factors and overall risk scores, representing relative risk of Phytophthora infection (Phytophthora ramorum and P. kernoviae), for heathland fragments across Scotland. Risk factors include climate suitability, proximity to road and river networks and suitability of habitat for key hosts of Phytophthora and were broadly concurrent with the period between 2007 and 2013. This research was funded by the Scottish Government under research contract CR/2008/55, 'Study of the epidemiology of Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae in managed gardens and heathlands in Scotland' and involved collaborators from St Andrews University, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA), Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), Forestry Commission, the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8f09b7e6-6daa-4823-b338-4edad8de1461

  • Estimates of annual volumes of manure produced by six broad farm livestock types for England and Wales at 10 km resolution, modelled with MANURES-GIS [1]. The farm livestock classes are: dairy cattle; beef cattle; pigs; sheep and other livestock; laying hens; broilers and other poultry. The quantities produced by each type are subsequently apportioned into managed and field-deposited manure. The managed manure sources are categorised as beef farmyard manure, beef slurry, dairy farmyard manure, dairy slurry, broiler litter, layer manure, pig farmyard manure, pig slurry and sheep farmyard manure. The destinations are recorded as grass, winter arable, spring arable and direct excreta when grazing. For each 10 km square, the quantity of manure going from each source to each destination is estimated. The values specify amount of excreta, in kilograms for solid manure and in litres for liquid manure. [1] ADAS (2008) The National Inventory and Map of Livestock Manure Loadings to Agricultural Land: MANURES-GIS. Final Report for Defra Project WQ0103 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/517717f7-d044-42cf-a332-a257e0e80b5c

  • This dataset contains polylines depicting non-woodland linear tree and shrub features in Cornwall and much of Devon, derived from lidar data collected by the Tellus South West project. Data from a lidar (light detection and ranging) survey of South West England was used with existing open source GIS datasets to map non-woodland linear features consisting of woody vegetation. The output dataset is the product of several steps of filtering and masking the lidar data using GIS landscape feature datasets available from the Tellus South West project (digital terrain model (DTM) and digital surface model (DSM)), the Ordnance Survey (OS VectorMap District and OpenMap Local, to remove buildings) and the Forestry Commission (Forestry Commission National Forest Inventory Great Britain 2015, to remove woodland parcels). The dataset was tiled as 20 x 20 km shapefiles, coded by the bottom-left 10 km hectad name. Ground-truthing suggests an accuracy of 73.2% for hedgerow height classes. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4b5680d9-fdbc-40c0-96a1-4c022185303f