Keyword

Geology

3390 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Available actions
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Service types
Scale
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 3390
  • This is a spatial dataset containing polygons representing different geology types in the Moor House National Nature Reserve, northern Pennines, England. The survey was undertaken by G.A.L. Johnson under a grant by The Nature Conservancy in the 1950s and 1960s. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0e3aefb2-ce86-4d09-8ff0-6d165dfd48db

  • Scanned images of the records of all onshore Great Britain (or near shore) boreholes, trial pits, shafts and wells held in the BGS archives in either paper, microfilm or digital format. The records range from simple single page lithological logs through to hydrocarbon completion reports. Current collection over 1million records with 50,000 new records added per annum. Scanning started in 2002 and is ongoing with new records being scanned and added to the collection.

  • Direct geological observations made during field work, tied to positional information collected by hand-held GPS.

  • Miscellaneous geological records for Scotland and Northern England of current or semi-current interest filed in order of accession. Some 65 accessions held which will be subject to review for permanent retention/destruction. Dataset created c.1970 and Indexed on Land Survey Record Index Database.

  • In 2011 the British Geological Survey (BGS) decided to begin the assembly of a National Geological Model (NGM) from its existing and on-going geological framework models , comprising integrated national crustal, bedrock and Quaternary models. The bedrock component is the most advanced of these themes and comprises both the calculated models and a complementary network of cross-sections that provide a fence diagram for the bedrock geology of Great Britain. This fence diagram, the GB3D_v2012 dataset is available in a variety of formats from the BGS website www.bgs.ac.uk as free downloads. It complements the existing 1:625 000 scale mapsheets published by BGS utilising the same colour schema and geological classification. The 121 component cross-sections extend to depths between 1.5 and 6 km; they have an aggregate length of over 20,000 km, and they are snapped together at their intersections to ensure total consistency. The sections are based on the existing BGS geological framework models where they cut through them, they also take account of the vast wealth of published data on the subsurface structure of Britain both from BGS and in the literature. Much of this is in the form of cross-sections, contour maps of surfaces, and thicknesses (isopachs). The fence diagram has been built in the Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3D (GSI3D) software. It is envisaged that this dataset will form a useful educational resource for geoscience students and the general public, and also provide the bedrock geology context and structure for regional and catchment scale studies. The fence diagram was built in 2009-12 using funding from the BGS National Capability Programme and the Environment Agency of England and Wales. 14 expert regional geologists compiled the sections.

  • The collection consists of records of enquiries answered by the Land Survey from c.1939 to 1970, with a small number of earlier records. Pre c.1960 files relate mainly to economic mineral enquiries while files after that year relate increasingly to enquiries on geological site conditions. Enquiry records of former Leeds and Newcastle offices, relevant to UK(North), are held for c.1950 to 1992. Edinburgh Office enquiry files dated up to 1970 have been reviewed for retention/destruction and those of continuing informational or historical value have been retained as archives. Post 1970 files are confidential to BGS staff. Indexed on Land Survey Record Index (LSRI). Edinburgh enquiry files are referenced EE, (ex-Newcastle Office enquiries, EN). Covers Scotland and Northern England with concentrations in urban ares. All non-confidential data held by NGRC(North) is available to users.

  • Geological observations during field walks, with coordinates, photographs and descriptions of rocks/geological materials and features at the various stops.

  • The 1:250k Geological Maps of Northern Ireland comprise the Superficial Deposits Map (Drift, 1991) and the Bedrock Map (Solid Geology, 1997). These maps identify landscape areas based on their lithology. The scale of the maps is 1:250 000 and provides a simplified interpretation of the geology that may be used as a guide at a regional level, but should not be relied on for local geology. Superficial deposits are younger geological deposits formed during the most recent geological time; the Quaternary. These deposits rest on older rocks or deposits referred to as bedrock. The superficial deposits theme defines landscape areas with a geological name and their deposit-type or lithological composition. The Superficial map shows the deposits within the extent of the six Counties of Northern Ireland. The Bedrock map comprises the bedrock geology and contains dykes and geological faults. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy of the rocks. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Dykes defines small, narrow areas of a specific type of bedrock geology; that is igneous rocks which have been intruded into the landscape at a later date than the surrounding bedrock. Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The Bedrock map shows the main bedrock geological divisions in Northern Ireland and coverage extends to the west into the Republic of Ireland. The printed map includes a stratigraphic column. Digital datasets have been derived from the maps and comprise three layers. 1. Superficial polygons, 2. Bedrock polygons and 3. Linear features. Attribute tables describe the polygon features. These data are generalised and superseded by the 1:10k Geological Maps of Northern Ireland.

  • Collections of miscellaneous items mainly of semi-current value, including some field observations supplementary to 1:10560/1:10K mapping, arranged on 1:10K or One-Inch sheet basis. Set up in 1950's filing miscellaneous records for Scotland and Northern England. Records of archival value for permanent retention being transferred to Land Survey Archives (LSA). Indexed in the Land Survey Record Index (LSRI).

  • In 2011 the British Geological Survey (BGS) decided to begin the assembly of a National Geological Model (NGM) from its existing and on-going geological framework models , comprising integrated national crustal, bedrock and Quaternary models. The bedrock component is the most advanced of these themes and comprises both the calculated models and a complementary network of cross-sections that provide a fence diagram for the bedrock geology of Great Britain. This fence diagram, the GB3D_v2014 dataset is available in a variety of formats from the BGS website www.bgs.ac.uk as free downloads, it supercedes the earlier 2012 version. The model complements the existing 1:625 000 scale mapsheets published by BGS utilising the same colour schema and geological classification. The component cross-sections extend to depths between 1.5 and 6 km; they have an aggregate length of over 25,000 km, and they are snapped together at their intersections to ensure total consistency. The sections are based on the existing BGS geological framework models where they cut through them together and incorporate around 300 deep stratigraphic boreholes across England and Wales. The sections also take account of the vast wealth of published data on the subsurface structure of Britain both from BGS and in the scientific literature. Much of this is in the form of cross-sections, contour maps of surfaces, and thicknesses (isopachs). The fence diagram has been built in the Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3D (GSI3D) software. It is envisaged that this dataset will form a useful educational resource for geoscience students and the general public, and also provide the bedrock geology context and structure for regional and catchment scale studies. The fence diagram has been built in stages between 2009-14 using funding from the BGS National Capability Programme the Environment Agency of England and Wales, and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. Some 16 expert regional geologists compiled the sections.