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2015

667 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 667
  • WCRP CMIP5: The MIROC team MIROC5 model output for the decadal1979 experiment. These data cover the following realms: aerosol, atmos, land, landIce, ocean and seaIce; at the following frequencies: fx and mon. The runs included the ensemble members: r0i0p0, r1i1p1, r2i1p1, r3i1p1, r4i1p1, r5i1p1 and r6i1p1. The WCRP Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5), was a global climate model intercomparison project, coordinated by PCMDI (Program For Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) on behalf of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and provided input for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5). The MIROC team consisted of the following agencies: Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute (AORI) and Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC).

  • Airborne atmospheric measurements from core and non-core instrument suites data on board the FAAM BAE-146 aircraft collected for STICCS - Submillimetre Trial In Cirrus and Clear Skies and ISMAR Test flight: International Sub-Millimetre Airborne Radiometer projects.

  • Cloud base and backscatter data from the Met Office's Jenoptik CHM15k Nimbus ceilometer located at Dishforth, Yorkshire. The Met Office's laser cloud base recorders network (LCBRs), or ceilometers, returns a range of products for use in forecasting and hazard detection. The backscatter profiles can allow detection of aerosol species such as volcanic ash where suitable instrumentation is deployed.

  • The ESA Ocean Colour CCI project has produced global level 3 binned multi-sensor time-series of satellite ocean-colour data with a particular focus for use in climate studies. This dataset contains the Version 1.0 Remote Sensing Reflectance product on a sinusoidal projection at approximately 4 km spatial resolution and at a daily time resolution. Values for remote sensing reflectance at the sea surface are provided for the standard SeaWiFS wavelengths (412, 443, 490, 510, 555, 670nm) with pixel-by-pixel uncertainty estimates for each wavelength. These are merged products based on SeaWiFS, MERIS and Aqua-MODIS data. Note, this dataset is also contained within the 'All Products' dataset. This data product is on a sinusoidal equal-area grid projection, matching the NASA standard level 3 binned projection. The default number of latitude rows is 4320, which results in a vertical bin cell size of approximately 4 km. The number of longitude columns varies according to the latitude, which permits the equal area property. Unlike the NASA format, where the bin cells that do not contain any data are omitted, the CCI format retains all cells and simply marks empty cells with a NetCDF fill value. (A separate dataset is also available for data on a geographic projection).

  • Airborne atmospheric measurements from core and non-core instrument suites data on board the FAAM BAE-146 aircraft collected for Ice and Precipitation Initiation in Cumulus (ICEPIC) project.

  • The joint PHE-GSNI-BGS digital Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Northern Ireland. The Radon Potential map for Northern Ireland shows the estimated percentage of homes in an area exceeding the radon Action Level. This is the basic information to assigning the level of protection required for new buildings and extensions, as described in the Building Research Establishment guidance BR-413 Radon: Guidance on protective measures for new dwellings in Northern Ireland (2004). The Radon Potential map for Northern Ireland is based on PHE indoor radon measurements and 1:10 000 or 1: 250 000 scale digital geology information provided by the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland (GSNI). The indoor radon data is used with the agreement of the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and PHE. Confidentiality of measurement locations is maintained through data management practices. Access to the data is restricted. Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. Public Health England (PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average exceed 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3), the Action Level. PHE defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration at or above the Action Level. Further information on radon can be obtained from www.ukradon.org

  • WCRP CMIP5: Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M) MPI-ESM-LR model output for the volcIn2010 experiment. These data cover the following realms: atmos, land, landIce, ocean and seaIce; at the following frequencies: day, fx and mon. The runs included the ensemble members: r0i0p0, r10i1p1, r1i1p1, r2i1p1, r3i1p1, r4i1p1, r5i1p1, r6i1p1, r7i1p1, r8i1p1 and r9i1p1. The WCRP Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5), was a global climate model intercomparison project, coordinated by PCMDI (Program For Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) on behalf of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and provided input for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5).

  • Cloud base and backscatter data from the Met Office's Camborne Cl31 ceilometer located at Camborne, Cornwall. The Met Office's laser cloud base recorders network (LCBRs), or ceilometers, returns a range of products for use in forecasting and hazard detection. The backscatter profiles can allow detection of aerosol species such as volcanic ash where suitable instrumentation is deployed.

  • The project is mainly experimental in nature. Sieved samples of a variety of UK, Canadian and Spanish limestones will be pre-calcined and sintered at elevated temperatures to differing extents under various steam atmospheres, potentially with the addition of salts. The relativities of the produced materials will be tested, initially in a thermogravimetric analyser and subsequently in a small electrically-heated fluidised bed. If time allows, extended work will be conducted at elevated pressure (10 - 20 bar), more typical of conditions in pre-combustion capture. In essence, the aim of the project is to develop inexpensive sorbents for CO2 to work within an efficient thermodynamic cycle. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-206.

  • Isotope analysis data. Project details: The continental crust is our only archive of Earth history; not just of the crust itself but of the hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere, and of the deep Earth through its interactions with the crust. This archive, like the rock record itself, is incomplete and much effort is focused on interrogating the crust to gain a clearer and more complete picture of Earth history. The continental rock record is episodic with, for example, ages of igneous crystallization, metamorphism, continental margins, and seawater and atmospheric proxies distributed about a series of peaks and troughs that in part correspond with the cycle of supercontinent assembly and dispersal. At the core of the debate is what these well-established peaks of ages in the geological record represent and how they develop. The peaks of ages correspond with periods of global assembly of continents to form supercontinents. The project will address whether the peaks of ages are primary features associated with supercontinent assembly or break up, or they are they secondary features representing greater preservation potential at the times of supercontinent assembly. Our work will focus on the Rodinian supercontinent cycle, which extends from initiation of convergent plate interaction around 1.7 Ga, to continental collision at 1.1-1.0 Ga during the Grenville orogeny, to final breakup of the supercontinent by 0.54 Ga. Detrital zircons from sedimentary units throughout the supercontinent cycle provide a record of the magmatic activity for which the igneous rocks are often no longer preserved. We will determine (i) the ages ranges of magmatic activity preserved in the sedimentary rocks in the 600 Ma pre-collision phase, and (ii) how and when the distinctive Grenville peak of ages developed by comparing the zircon record from samples pre-, syn- and post- Rodinian supercontinent assembly with estimated volumes of magma and numbers of zircons produced during the same interval. This will differentiate primary generation processes from secondary processes, constraining when the dominant age peak developed, the tectonic processes that operated, and hence the method by which it developed. The wider implications of when the continental crust formed are considerable. Studies of continental growth continue to uncritically assume that the geological and isotopic record provide insight into processes of crust formation. Until it can be established whether the record is the outcome of generational or preservational processes, or a combination of both, then drawing conclusions on this fundamental question in the Earth Sciences are premature. If the record is a preservational record then this impacts on understanding continental growth through time and on secondary questions of how the crustal record is used to unravel the temporal evolution of the hydrosphere and biosphere, and the distribution of mineral deposits.