Creation year

2015

702 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Available actions
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Service types
Scale
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 702
  • This dataset contains discharge and surface water chemistry for the six river reaches of contrasting geology (clay, sand, chalk) in the Hampshire Avon. Manual measurements of discharge by the velocity-area method enabled construction of a stage-discharge relationship for each site. Stream stage was measured using pressure transducers from Summer 2013 to Summer 2015. River water samples were collected at 48-hr intervals from Summer 2013 to Summer 2014 and samples were analysed for selected solutes and suspended sediment. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0dd10858-7b96-41f1-8db5-e7b4c4168af5

  • This data set provides a spatial stratification of forest cover into discrete vegetation classes according to the High Carbon Stock (HCS) Approach. The data set covers the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) project site located in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. Data were collected in 2015 during a project which was included in the NERC Human-modified tropical forest (HMTF) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/81cad1ef-b5cc-4592-a71f-204a5d04b700

  • Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) data for Integrated Hydrological Units (IHU) groups (Kral et al. [1]). SPI is a drought index based on the probability of precipitation for a given accumulation period as defined by McKee et al. [2]. SPI is calculated for different accumulation periods: 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 months. Each of these is in turn calculated for each of the twelve calendar months. Note that values in monthly (and for longer accumulation periods also annual) time series of the data therefore are likely to be autocorrelated. The standard period which was used to fit the gamma distribution is 1961-2010. The dataset covers the period from 1961 to 2012. [1] Kral, F., Fry, M., Dixon, H. (2015). Integrated Hydrological Units of the United Kingdom: Groups. NERC-Environmental Information Data Centre doi:10.5285/f1cd5e33-2633-4304-bbc2-b8d34711d902 [2] McKee, T. B., Doesken, N. J., Kleist, J. (1993). The Relationship of Drought Frequency and Duration to Time Scales. Eighth Conference on Applied Climatology, 17-22 January 1993, Anaheim, California. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/dfd59438-2170-4472-b810-bab33a83d09f

  • The meteorological data describes the air and soil temperatures, net radiation balance, down-welling photosynthetically active radiation, wind speed, wind direction and the vapour pressure deficit. Data collection was carried out at Cartmel Sands marsh from the 31st of May 2013 till the 26th of January 2015. The Cartmel Sands site is in Morecambe, North West England, and the meteorological tower was situated in the middle of the marsh. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b1e2fb9c-8c34-490a-b6ae-2fdf6b460726

  • This dataset contains measurements of hydraulic head and saturated hydraulic conductivity together with porewater chemistry from banks and riverbed sediments in six river reaches of contrasting geology (clay, sand, chalk) in the Hampshire Avon. Falling and rising (slug) test data were used for computation of saturated hydraulic conductivity. Hydraulic head measurements were obtained from pressure transducers installed in piezometers between Summer 2013 and Summer 2015. Samples for porewater chemical analysis were collected from porewater sampling tubes on the piezometer network between Summer 2014 and Summer 2015. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d82a04ce-f04d-40b4-9750-1a2bf7dc29a3

  • This dataset contains seed counts of Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to form experimental arrays within habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100 hectare replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). On each plant, the seed set was measured for flowers which were exposed and excluded from pollinators to determine the effects of habitat context on plant reproduction. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5b400b69-b828-45e8-b04e-7ccbfdb0987f

  • This dataset details the germination rates of seeds from Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays were introduced across the study site, Arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100ha replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). After sixteen days plants were collected in and stored under glasshouse conditions. Upon fruit maturation, 20 seeds from each of the 48 field exposed plants was sown into compost and the number which successfully germinated was counted. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f9dd7a39-f408-4e11-8819-46afa05457bd

  • This dataset comprises 259 smallholder agricultural field surveys collected from twenty-six villages across three Districts in Mozambique, Africa. Surveys were conducted in ten fields in each of six villages in Mabalane District, Gaza Province, ten villages in Marrupa District, Niassa Province, and ten villages in Gurue District, Zambezia Province. Data were collected in Mabalane between May-Sep 2014, Marrupa between May-Aug 2015, and Gurue between Sep-Dec 2015. Fields were selected based on their age, location, and status as an active field at the time of the survey (i.e. no fallow fields were sampled). Structured interviews using questionnaires were conducted with each farmer to obtain information about current management practices (e.g. use of inputs, tilling, fire and residue management), age of the field, crops planted, crop yields, fallow cycles, floods, erosion and other problems such as crop pests and wild animals. The survey also includes qualitative observations about the fields at the time of the interview, including standing live trees and cropping systems. This dataset was collected as part of the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) funded ACES project , which aims to understand how changing land use impacts on ecosystem services and human wellbeing of the rural poor in Mozambique. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/78c5dcee-61c1-44be-9c47-8e9e2d03cb63

  • This dataset details the number of seeds produced by pollinator exposed and supplemented Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays were introduced across the study site. Arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100ha replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). After 16 days plants were collected in and one flower from each plant was supplemented with outcrossed pollen. Upon fruit maturation the mean number of seeds counted from pollinator exposed fruit were then compared to the number of seeds from supplemented fruit to determine the degree of pollen limitation in relation to habitat context. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8caf2d8a-564d-4f2e-a797-174165a83796

  • This dataset contains a list of pollinator species caught within pan traps from habitats comprising different floral cover. Data were collected from the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire in June 2015. Surveys were conducted alongside four experimental arrays of the Californian poppy, Eschscholzia californica, located with two habitats; a sown wildflower mix and bare, fallow ground. This set-up was repeated over four 100ha blocks separated at a distance greater than 500m. Pan traps comprised three water-filled circular plastic bowls (80 x 200 mm) painted with non-toxic fluorescent paint (1 yellow, 1 blue and 1 white; UV Gear, UK) placed in the centre of each array. Traps were deployed for 24 hours at each of the 16 arrays on the same day, twice weekly over the 16 day study period (totalling four surveys). Each survey was done in randomised order, between 0930 and 1700. All insects from the main pollinator groups (Hymenoptera: Apoidea, Diptera: Syrphidae and Lepidoptera) were counted and identified to species level. The intertegular span (the distance between the wing bases) of each insect from the main pollinator groups was then measured using digital callipers. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/01906784-6742-44bf-b244-a4b63bed8d82