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2015

205 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 205
  • Scanned images of well logs for oil and gas exploration and appraisal wells drilled on the UK Continental Shelf and held on behalf of the Oil & Gas Authority (formerly the Department of Energy and Climate Change).

  • The Terra-correlator: A computing facility for massive real-time data assimilation in environmental science. Two Application Framework Papers: 1) Report on Terra-Correlator Application Framework. 2) Use Cases and Requirements for Terra-Correlator Application Framework, plus the codes used for the work done.

  • This data contains the results of numerical simulations described in the following two papers: Alisic L., Rhebergen S., Rudge J.F., Katz R.F., Wells G.N. Torsion of a cylinder of partially molten rock with a spherical inclusion: theory and simulation (2016) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst.16 doi:10.1002/2015GC006061 Alisic L., Rudge J.F., Katz R.F., Wells G.N., Rhebergen S. Compaction around a rigid, circular inclusion in partially molten rock (2014) J. Geophys. Res. Solid Earth 119:5903-5920 doi:10.1002/2013JB010906

  • Description of peatland sites included in the compilation of carbon accumulation rates, including resolution (high, low), interpolation (yes/no), contributor name, country, lon, lat, peatland type, dominant plant type, no. of dates used in the last millenium carbon accumulation rate calculation, and problems with the data. Peatland sites at northern hemisphere high and mid latitudes (260), tropical (30) and southern hemisphere high latitudes (7 sites).

  • This is continuous raw data from 3-component broad-band (30 sec to 100 Hz) Guralp 6TD seismometer deployments around Askja in the central region of Iceland.

  • The joint PHE-GSNI-BGS digital Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland presents an overview of the results of detailed mapping of radon potential, defined as the estimated percentage of homes in an area above the radon Action Level. The Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland presents a simplified version of the Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland, with each 1-km grid square being classed according to the highest radon potential found within it, so is indicative rather than definitive. The Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Northern Ireland. The Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland is published in Z Daraktchieva, J D Appleton, D M Rees, K A M Adlam, A H Myers, S A Hodgson, N P McColl, G R Wasson and L J Peake, 2015. Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland. PHE-CRCE-017, 22 pp. Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. Public Health England (PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average exceed 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3), the radon Action Level. Public Health England defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration exceeding the Action Level.

  • The joint PHE-GSNI-BGS digital Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Northern Ireland. The Radon Potential map for Northern Ireland shows the estimated percentage of homes in an area exceeding the radon Action Level. This is the basic information to assigning the level of protection required for new buildings and extensions, as described in the Building Research Establishment guidance BR-413 Radon: Guidance on protective measures for new dwellings in Northern Ireland (2004). The Radon Potential map for Northern Ireland is based on PHE indoor radon measurements and 1:10 000 or 1: 250 000 scale digital geology information provided by the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland (GSNI). The indoor radon data is used with the agreement of the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and PHE. Confidentiality of measurement locations is maintained through data management practices. Access to the data is restricted. Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. Public Health England (PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average exceed 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3), the Action Level. PHE defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration at or above the Action Level. Further information on radon can be obtained from www.ukradon.org

  • The datasets contain FIB-SEM and X-ray micro-tomographic images of a wettability-altered carbonate rock sample before and after dissolution with reactive CO2-saturated brine at reservoir pressure and temperature conditions. The data were acquired with the aim of investigating CO2 storage in depleted oil fields that have oil-wet or mixed-wet conditions. Our novel procedure of injecting oil after reactive transport has revealed previously unidentified (ghost) regions of partially-dissolved rock grains that were difficult to identify in X-ray tomographic images after dissolution from single fluid phase experiments. The details of image files and imaging parameters are described in readme file.

  • In this study, two strategies, thermal pretreatment and chemical doping, were investigated as a method of improving the residual carrying capacity of Longcliffe and Havelock limestone for calcium looping systems. Four parameters were varied during thermal pretreatment: temperature (900-1100 degrees C), time (3-12 hr), gas composition (0-100 % CO2 balanced in N2) and particle size (90-355 micrometre). After pre-calcination, the sorbents were subjected to 20 carbonation-calcination cycles performed in a thermographic analyser (TGA) to monitor any signs of sorbent improvement. The degradation of sorbent activity was modelled using the decay equation suggested by Grasa and Abanades (2006). Both Longcliffe and Havelock samples showed self-reactivation when pretreated under CO2, however this did not result in a greater carrying capacity after 20 carbonation/calcination cycles compared to the untreated limestone. For chemical doping, Longcliffe doped using 0.167 mol % HBr via quantitative wet impregnation method resulted in an increase in residual carrying capacity of 27.4 % after thermal pre-treatment under CO2 when compared to the untreated but doped limestone, assuming self-reactivation continued as modelled. When Longcliffe was doped and then pretreated under pure N2, the limestone showed self-reactivation, which was not seen in the undoped sorbent when also pretreated under N2. Thus, the success of pretreatment may be dependent on the chemical composition of the limestone. Finally, BET surface area and BJH pore volume analysis was used to understand the changes in the sorbents' morphologies. The closure of the mesopores (dpore<150 nm) after the pretreatment was correlated to the self-reactivation in the subsequent cycles.

  • Seawater carbonate system properties and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration reconstructions from Eocene planktonic foraminifera using boron isotope analyses.