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2005

118 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 118
  • The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMap (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of slope instability. Landslide hazard occurs due to particular slope characteristics (such as geology, gradient, sources of water, drainage, man-made constructions) combining to cause the slope to become unstable. Downslope movement of materials, such as a landslide or rockfall may lead to a loss of support and damage to buildings. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • In January 1993, as part of the Joule II Non-nuclear Energy Research Programme, the European Commission initiated a two year study of the potential for the disposal of industrial quantifies of carbon dioxide underground, with a view to reducing emissions to the atmosphere. The participants in the study were the British Geological Survey (UK), TNO Institute of Applied Geoscience (The Netherlands), BRGM (France), CRE Group Ltd (UK), IKU Petroleum Research (Norway), RWE AG (Germany), University of Sunderland Renewable Energy Centre (UK) and Statoil (Norway). The objective of the study was to examine whether carbon dioxide emissions from large point sources such as power stations, could be disposed of safely, economically and with no adverse effects on man and the environment. Project No. CT92-0031.

  • Data identifying linear features (shown as polylines) representing geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised set of linear features. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland, and the Isle of Man. Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The digital data are attributed by fault type; two categories of fault are described in the data: contact and non-contact faults. Contact faults form a boundary between two different rock types whilst non-contact faults indicate a fault displacement within the same rock. The data has been generalised and shows only the location of major faults. All faults shown are inferred i.e. not exposed or seen at a locality, but derived from other evidence including linear depressions in the landscape, the truncation or displacement of topographical features. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • The data comprises GIS layers representing the permeability of artificial deposits for Great Britain. The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through these deposits and the ability of a lithostratigraphical unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The methodology is based on BGS DiGMap (Digital Map) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for a geological deposit to show running sand behaviour under the action of flowing water, a characteristic usually of saturated sand and silt grade material. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • The dataset is based on a 1 hectare(ha) vector grid which covers the whole of England. It has been populated with a series of environmental and cultural assets, reflecting the presence or absence of an asset in an individual cell. The dataset has been designed to enable a single asset to be displayed in a generalised fomat; total numbers of assets within a given cell; or the opportunity to create in unique combination of the assets based on the generalised 1 ha data. The data is also available at 1km.

  • NIGL (NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratories) is a comprehensive stable and radiogenic isotope laboratory facility that undertakes environmental, life, archaeological and earth science research, and educates and trains PhD students, in a collaborative research environment. This dataset contains a complete record of publications and scientific reports involving NIGL staff, dating from the formation of the group in 1987. The published research is not geographically restricted.

  • SCCS presentations, consultations, responses, briefings and communications on CCS and CO2 storage for the period 2005 - 2009

  • SCCS is the largest Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) research group in the UK. Our internationally renowned researchers provide connected strength across the full CCS chain. With our unique position SCCS is able to act as the conduit between academia, industry and government. We are able to provide a single point of coordination for all aspects of CCS research ranging from capture engineering and geoscience, to social perceptions and environmental impact, through to law and petroleum economics. SCCS has access to cutting-edge experimental and analytical facilities, expertise in field studies, modelling and simulation, key academic and research personnel to accelerate the development of CO2 transportation, capture and subsurface storage. We undertake strategic fundamental research and are also available for consultancy. In addition, we perform a key role in providing impartial advice to industry, the public sector, government agencies, and policy makers. Founded in 2005, SCCS is a partnership of the British Geological Survey, Heriot-Watt University, the University of Aberdeen, the University of Edinburgh and the University of Strathclyde working together with universities across Scotland. SCCS is funded by the Scottish Funding Council (SFC).

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. The bedrock geology of Great Britain is very diverse and includes three broad classes based on their mode of origin: igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary. The data includes attribution to identify each rock type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volumes 1-3 ). The bedrock has formed over long periods of geological time, from the Archean eon some 7500 million years ago, to the relatively young Pliocene, 58 million years ago. The age of the rocks is identified in the data through their BGS lexicon name (published for each deposit at the time of the original survey or subsequent digital data creation). For stratified rocks i.e. arranged in sequence, this will usually be of a lithostratigraphic type. Other rock types for example intrusive igneous bodies will be of a lithodemic type. More information on the formal naming of UK rocks is available in the BGS Lexicon of Named Rock Units. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition, using visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.