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geoscientificInformation

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From 1 - 10 / 1944
  • This data set includes a range of physico-chemical properties measured from topsoil within a wide range of land use types across Wales, collected as part of the Glastir Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (GMEP). The properties included are: soil organic matter (loss on ignition (LOI)), derived carbon concentration, total soil organic carbon (SOC), nitrogen, total soil phosphorous, Olsen-phosphorous (within improved land only), pH, electrical conductivity, soil bulk density of fine earth, fine earth volumetric water content when sampled and soil water repellency - water drop penetration time. The monitoring programme was set up by the Welsh Government in 2013 to monitor the effects of the Glastir agri-environment scheme on the environment and ran from 2013 to 2016. The field survey element was based on a stratified random sampling design of 300 x 1km square sites across Wales, and was managed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0fa51dc6-1537-4ad6-9d06-e476c137ed09

  • This dataset includes two cruises of data collected to investigate Arctic hydrate dissociation as a consequence of climate change and to determine vulnerable methane reservoir and gas escape mechanisms. Work during both JR269A and JR269B was focused on two separate geographical areas. The first of these was west of Prins Karls Forland, in water depths of between 150 and 1200 m. At its landward end, this survey area crosses a region at water depths up to 400 m where a dense concentration of methane escape bubble plumes occur. The second survey area straddles the summit of the Vestnesa Ridge, in water depths of 1180 to 1400 m, and is also the site of methane escape bubble plumes within the water column and of fluid escape chimneys and pockmarks previously imaged at and beneath the sea bed. This area lies approximately 100 km west of the mouth of Kongsfjorden. Data collection took place between August 2011 and July 2012. The research expedition used a deep-towed, very high resolution seismic system to image the small-scale structures that convey gas to the seabed and to detect the presence of gas in the sediments. This was done in conjunction with an electromagnetic exploration system that uses a deep-towed transmitter and receivers on the seabed to derive the variations in electrical resistivity in the sediments beneath the seabed. The observations carried out on the two cruises included; underway, meteorological observations and echo sounder data, multichannel seismic reflection profiling data, wide angle seismic survey data, and ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) data, ocean bottom electro-magnetometer data and controlled source electromagnetic surveys (CSEM). The overall objectives of the project were to determine the spatial distribution of gas and hydrate accumulations beneath the sea bed; to investigate and understand gas transport and escape mechanisms, their spatial distribution, and the controls on these; and to quantify gas and hydrate saturation values in situ within the pore spaces of the shallow sediment reservoirs. The research is focused on specific areas where significant accumulations of methane hydrate and active methane venting through the sea floor were observed and documented during the earlier JR211 cruise in 2008. This is a NERC funded project hosted by University of Southampton. The data held at BODC include multichannel seismic reflection, TOPAS sub-bottom profiler and 2D seismic reflection data in SEG-Y format. No further data are expected.

  • This dataset contains the results of a laboratory study investigating the dissolution of UO3•nH2O particles in dynamic sediment/groundwater column systems, representative of the shallow subsurface at the Sellafield Ltd. site, UK. Measurements were carried out to determine the extent of uranic particle dissolution and the speciation of dissolved uranium within the columns under contrasting biogeochemical conditions (oxic and electron-donor amended). Columns effluents were analysed periodically for key biogeochemical indicators (nitrate, sulfate) and trace metals (iron, manganese, uranium) and systems were sacrificed after 6 and 12 months of groundwater flow. Upon sacrifice, columns were cross-sectioned, and the sediment structure preserved for synchrotron micro-focus X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) mapping, and uranium L-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. Sub-samples of column sediments were also analysed for acid extractable metals, microbial abundance and classification and bioavailable Fe(II) concentrations. Experiments were performed between March 2016 and March 2017. Subsequent analyses were performed between March 2017 and December 2018. This data was collected as part of the project: Understanding radioactive ‘hot’ particle evolution in the environment funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (grant NE/M014088/1). Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2702e1b0-13df-4ae4-9f91-4ac4bd07bbf1

  • This dataset presents modelled estimates of soil pH at 1km2 resolution across Great Britain. A Generalized Additive Model approach was used with Countryside Survey soil pH data from 2007 and including climate, atmospheric deposition, habitat, soil and spatial predictors. The model is based on soil pH data from 2446 locations across Great Britain and is representative of 0-15 cm soil depth. Soil pH was measured using 10g of field moist soil with 25ml de-ionised water giving a ratio of soil to water of 1:2.5 by weight. The Countryside Survey looks at a range of physical, chemical and biological properties of the topsoil from a representative sample of habitats across the UK. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4b0e364d-61e6-48fb-8973-5eb18fb454cd

  • The British Geological Survey has one of the largest databases in the world on the production and trade of minerals. The dataset contains annual production statistics by mass for more than 70 mineral commodities covering the majority of economically important and internationally-traded minerals, metals and mineral-based materials. For each commodity the annual production statistics are recorded for individual countries, grouped by continent. Import and export statistics are also available for years up to 2002. Maintenance of the database is funded by the Science Budget and output is used by government, private industry and others in support of policy, economic analysis and commercial strategy. As far as possible the production data are compiled from primary, official sources. Quality assurance is maintained by participation in such groups as the International Consultative Group on Non-ferrous Metal Statistics. Individual commodity and country tables are available for sale on request.

  • This dataset presents modelled estimates of soil nitrogen concentration (% dry weight soil) at 1km2 resolution across Great Britain. A Generalized Additive Model approach was used with Countryside Survey soil nitrogen data from 2007 and including climate, atmospheric deposition, habitat, soil and spatial predictors. The model is based on soil nitrogen data from 913 locations across Great Britain and is representative of 0-15 cm soil depth. Soil N concentration was determined using a total elemental analyser. The Countryside Survey looks at a range of physical, chemical and biological properties of the topsoil from a representative sample of habitats across the UK. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8ec2d5ae-5d19-4b58-8cf6-aafdad485bb2

  • The data consist of soil carbon in kilogrammes (kg) of carbon per metre squared. Soil cores were taken to a depth of 1 metre and divided into 15 cm depth increments. Soil carbon (kg carbon per metre squared) was determined for all soil depth increments. The soil samples were taken in the Conwy catchment in North West Wales. Samples were collected in the spring of 2014 across a land use intensification gradient ranging from semi-natural peatlands, acid grasslands to improved grasslands and arable fields. Soil parameters were tested across a land use intensification gradient to detect parameters that can predict aboveground biomass production across different land management types. Data were used to enhance the predictions of biomass production in the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator model (JULES). Measurements informed the improvement of the nitrogen cycle component in the model. This dataset is part of a data series where plant and soil measurements were collected together to increase our understanding of coupled aboveground and belowground processes. Measurements were undertaken by trained members of staff from Bangor University, the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and Exeter University. This data was collected for the NERC project 'The Multi-Scale Response of Water quality, Biodiversity and Carbon Sequestration to Coupled Macronutrient Cycling from Source to Sea' (NE/J011991/1). The project is also referred to as Turf2Surf. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/dd6835bf-9c7e-4ad6-95f2-d15f24162fb3

  • This dataset (GSE_SPECIMENS) is an index of the specimens and palaeontological slides held in the Type and Stratigraphical (T&S) Collection of Scotland and Northern England. This index along with GSE_REFERENCES (List Of Specimens From The UK (North) Type And Stratigraphical Collection And Related Publications) and to some extent SMITH_GSE (Index To Specimens Transferred From The John Smith Collection To The UK (North) Type and Stratigraphical Collection) are the digital equivalents of the analogue card index (held in BGS Edinburgh). The latter contains c.16k records, of which perhaps 25% have been transcribed. The sporadically growing T&S Collection (which is derived from the Survey Collection) comprises some 16k specimens. About 11k are housed at BGS Keyworth and c.5k remain at BGS Edinburgh. The specimens are individually registered in 5 leather bound volumes. These are held in BGS Keyworth, but equivalent information (microfilm and paper records) is held in BGS Edinburgh. For each specimen, the MS Access database MTD_GSE_SPECS provides a link with the Survey Collection, gives nomenclatural, taxonomical, geographical and stratigraphical information, an indication on where the fossil is housed, and any comments, perhaps on the state of preservation.

  • Descriptive register with detailed indexes of the Nottingham man-made caves. Data mainly captured 1989, infrequent additions (approximately 1 per year) since then

  • The database contains basic tabulated field data resulting from the work of the BGS East Grampians Project in the early 1980s to mid 1990s. Records include the locations of stations at which field observations were made, structural measurements and sample locations. To this end, the database provides an index to locations and structural data. However, it needs to be stated clearly that labels given to structural elements are largely subjective beyond the identification of bedding. This means that the structural data are largely unusable without a clear understanding of their context and with regard to the primary paper record on which descriptions of the observed structures are recorded. The data are held in MS ACCESS tables which are related via the Station number as the primary key. The coverage is mainly confined to the North East Grampian Highlands of Scotland. The database is currently unused and has not been added to since the end of the East Grampians Project. The station location and structural data are effectively complete. However, fields in the sample database, such as the sample stratigraphy, are largely incomplete because, at the time the data were acquired, the stratigraphy at each station was formally undefined. The most effective way of presenting and investigating the data is via GIS.