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  • Scanned collection of seismological journals and offprints. The original collection was compiled by John Wartnaby. John Wartnaby was a curator at the Science Museum, London, and wrote a historical survey of seismology and scientific instruments. His accumulated papers consist chiefly of offprints and articles, and many older British Association seismological reports. The collection is part of the National Seismological Archive.

  • The National Seismological Archive (NSA) is the United Kingdom national repository for seismological material. It was created principally to preserve data from seismological observatories in the UK that have now closed. In many cases in the past records have been lost or destroyed when there is no longer anyone to look after them; the NSA provides a permanent home for these historical scientific documents, to preserve them for posterity. The principal collection consists of the seismograms stores from defunct observatories; also bulletins and reports from all over the world dating from the 1890s onwards, held in a variety of media, including earthquake-related newspaper cuttings, glass slides, microfilm, and comprehensive UK earthquake research material collected over a 30 year period. The archive has a public access room available for researchers and welcomes visiting scientists who wish to study material held in it. If it is impractical to visit, we may be able to supply data from it, subject to staff availability. One of the major projects of the archive has been the presentation of current knowledge of UK historical earthquake seismology material in a short series of reports, easily accessible to researchers. These are available for download as Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format files (.pdf) from the NSA download page.

  • In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report provides a summary of key decisions and design changes made during FEED that have resulted from the development of the End-to-End solution and the design works conducted by each of the Consortium Partners. The information described in this section captures the design decisions and changes that have had the most prominent impact on the End-to-End Basis of Design. For each key design change/decision, the background, options considered and the final outcome is described. The ScottishPower CCS Consortium Decision Register can be found in PDFs . The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (Key FEED decisions.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/feed_decisions/feed_decisions.aspx

  • The two earthquake scenario narratives are communications tools created to engage the local population and policy makers in Weinan city. They will be uploaded on the Overseas Development Institute website and be publicly accessible.

  • Core description, core samples and thin sections of Lower Carboniferous dolomite. Thesis : Reservoir Properties of Lower Carboniferous Limestone of the Derbyshire East Midlands Platform by Jack Stacey. Thesis: Advances in understanding the evolution of diagenesis in carboniferous carbonate platforms: insights from simulations of palaeohydrology, geochemistry, and stratigraphic development by Miles Frazer

  • In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report contains the cost estimate for the End-to-End CCS chain for the purposes of providing potential developers of CCS projects with indicative cost information regarding capital expenditure, operating costs and decommissioning/ abandonment costs. One of the key objectives of the FEED phase of the UKCCS Demonstration Competition was to increase the cost certainty for the overall project. During development of the Outline Solution, costs were estimated to an accuracy of -30% to +50%. Through the design and project development across the various Consortium workstreams (as outlined in the previous sections of this report), it has been possible to refine this accuracy and increase the cost certainty of the indicative core capital costs to approximately -12%/+15% accuracy. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (CCS project costs.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/ccs_costs/ccs_costs.aspx

  • During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a preliminary Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study has yielded invaluable knowledge on areas including project design, technical design, health and safety, environment, consents and project management. The E.ON UK FEED study material is available for download.

  • During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter presents the FEED stage Capture and Compression plant technical design. The 'Design Basis for CO2 Recovery Plant' lists the design parameters relating to the capture plant site, the flue gas to be treated, the utilities available, the required life and availability of the plant, and other constraints to be complied with in the capture plant, dehydration and compression design. The details of the processes of capture, compression, and dehydration are best visualised on the Process Flow Diagrams (PFDs) which show the process flows described above together with additional detail of coolers, pumps, and other plant items. Separate PFDs are provided for the capture plant, the compression plant, and the dehydration plant to show the complete flue gas and CO2 flows. Some of the key aspects of the technical design of the Capture and Compression plant are; There are two separate water circuits shown in the quencher with separate extractions of excess water. These have been separated because the recovered quench water is of good enough quality for re-use on the power station, whilst the deep FGD waste water is sent to the water treatment plant; Molecular sieves have been selected as the most appropriate equipment for dehydration of the CO2 prior to pipeline transportation; With the particular layout constraints of the Kingsnorth site, a split layout of the absorption and regeneration equipment is preferred over the compact layout. Further supporting documents for chapter 5 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/e_on_feed_/technical/technical.aspx

  • The UK government is committed to sharing the knowledge from the UK CCS projects. Under the 2013/2014 Front End Engineering and Design (FEED) contracts, the Peterhead (Goldeneye) and White Rose CCS projects delivered 86 reports. Under FEED, the completed reports are defined as Key Knowledge Deliverables (KKDs). The reports will enable both the Peterhead and White Rose projects to share the knowledge and learning acquired on their respective CCS projects. These Key Knowledge Deliverables from these FEED studies will cover many aspects of delivering a large scale commercial CCS project. This will include: commercial and financing arrangements; programme and risk management; consents and permitting; technical design, engineering and integration; health and safety; and lessons learnt. The KKDs will be published by DECC during 2015 and 2016. The reports can be accessed from https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/carbon-capture-and-storage-knowledge-sharing.

  • Geomorphological map of the Sutlej and Yamuna fans, northwestern India. Grant abstract: India is the largest agricultural user of groundwater in the world. The last 40 years has seen a revolutionary shift from large-scale surface water management to widespread groundwater abstraction, particularly in the northwestern states of Punjab, Haryana and Rajasthan. As a result of this, northwestern India is now a hotspot of groundwater depletion, with 'the largest rate of groundwater loss in any comparable-sized region on Earth' (Tiwari et al., 2009). This unsustainable use of groundwater becomes even more challenging when set increasing demands from a burgeoning population and industrialisation, together with potential but poorly understood effects of climate-driven changes in the water cycle. There are a number of innovative socio-economic strategies that can address this issue, including enhanced recharge and subsurface water storage, but their implementation and success depend on solid regional understanding of the geology and hydrogeology of the aquifer systems, and of the patterns and rates of groundwater flow and recharge. What we know about regional groundwater resources comes largely from either low-resolution studies based on satellite data, or from local investigations; there has been no large-scale, cross-state integrated study of the groundwater system. Groundwater in northwestern India is thought to be largely hosted within buried, sandy former river channels, which extend from the Himalayas toward the southwest and are separated by fine-grained muds. Only a few channels are visible at the surface; most are buried and their existence must be inferred. Our approach is founded on the premise that we must first understand the geology and geometry of the aquifer system before we can hope to estimate the way it will respond to a complex set of future stresses. This means that we must be able to describe the locations, sizes, and characteristics of these channels as well as their age and three-dimensional pattern. Once these characteristics are determined, we can forecast the likely future behaviour of the system. In this proposal, we will provide, for the first time, a regional assessment of the aquifer system in northwestern India, along with models for its evolution under changes in the water cycle and in the way in which groundwater is used. Our project will combine expertise in sedimentology, stratigraphy, sediment routing and basin evolution, hydrology, and isotope geochemistry to understand the geological framework of the aquifer system, the ages of the groundwaters within it, and the ways in which groundwater levels are likely to evolve over the next 50 years. The outcomes of the proposal will include (1) a comprehensive data base that covers the northwestern Indian aquifer system, (2) much better understanding of regional sources, ages, and flow rates of groundwater, and (3) a suite of predictions for how the groundwater system will respond to a range of different future scenarios.