Format

PDF

126 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Topics
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Formats
Representation types
Update frequencies
Scale
Resolution
From 1 - 10 / 126
  • During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter presents the Environment and Consents Reports produced during the current FEED stage. One of the key objectives of the FEED study was to develop information across the project chain, from CO2 generation to storage in sufficient detail to enable production of applications for environmental consents. A Consents Philosophy was generated upon commencement of the FEED to develop a programme of work to achieve this objective, and identified the following groups of consents: Power and capture plant: 1989 Electricity Act - Section 36; Onshore pipeline: 1990 Town and Country Planning Act; Offshore Pipeline; Offshore Platform; Storage Consents. Some keys aspects of the FEED Consents study are: There were significant uncertainties at the outset of the project regarding the types of consent required. This was a consequence of the planning consent for Kingsnorth Units 5 and 6 having already been submitted in 2006, new government policy and draft regulatory guidance, and ongoing government consultations on regulatory issues; Many of these issues were resolved, enabling development of consent applications for the integrated power and capture plant and onshore and offshore CO2 pipeline. However in some cases, particularly for the offshore platform and storage, uncertainty remained throughout the project. In these instances the deliverable was an interpretation of the regulatory requirements that will need to be reviewed and taken into account to obtain consents during subsequent stages of the project. Further supporting documents for chapter 9 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/e_on_feed_/environment_/environment_.aspx

  • The UK government is committed to sharing the knowledge from the UK CCS projects. Under the 2013/2014 Front End Engineering and Design (FEED) contracts, the Peterhead (Goldeneye) and White Rose CCS projects delivered 86 reports. Under FEED, the completed reports are defined as Key Knowledge Deliverables (KKDs). The reports will enable both the Peterhead and White Rose projects to share the knowledge and learning acquired on their respective CCS projects. These Key Knowledge Deliverables from these FEED studies will cover many aspects of delivering a large scale commercial CCS project. This will include: commercial and financing arrangements; programme and risk management; consents and permitting; technical design, engineering and integration; health and safety; and lessons learnt. The KKDs will be published by DECC during 2015 and 2016. The reports can be accessed from https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/carbon-capture-and-storage-knowledge-sharing.

  • In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report aims to inform potential developers of CCS of the impact of risks on the design of large-scale CCS. It discusses the ScottishPower CCS Consortium approach to risk management, looking particularly at the identification and mitigation of specific areas of risks during FEED and the mitigating actions required for the major residual risks. The section covers five key areas: Overview of the risk assessment process through FEED, including mitigation measures, major movement of the Top 50 risks on the Risk Register, and current active risks; Mitigation strategies for major project risks; Mitigation strategies for those risks with the potential to cause significant delay to the Overall Project Programme; Allocation and insurability of risks; Integrity and risk assessment of existing plant to be integrated; From the outset of FEED, risk management was co-ordinated by the Risk Workstream. The Risk Workstream included representatives of each of the Consortium Partners and Aker Clean Carbon. The Risk Workstream had a remit to capture, codify and report on progress with risk management throughout the study. The management of the risks themselves remained with the risk owners. The Consortium's risk management strategy was based on the provision of a cross-Consortium, over-arching risk management framework. This was developed to: Provide visibility of the Consortium's risk exposure Make best use of the Consortium Partners' risk management experience Facilitate the assessment of the impact of changes within the scope of one Partner's risk profile to the others Encourage the identification of risks at Partner interfaces Provide consistent risk reporting across the Consortium in line with agreed requirements Each Consortium Partner was responsible for reporting monthly on their risks to the Consortium risk lead, who in turn collated the Consortium Partner updates and reported the overall Consortium risk status to the Consortium Management Office and DECC to show how the total risk value changed over the course of FEED. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (Risk management.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/risk/risk.aspx

  • The two earthquake scenario narratives are communications tools created to engage the local population and policy makers in Weinan city. They will be uploaded on the Overseas Development Institute website and be publicly accessible.

  • In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report contains a high-level monthly summary of the total costs incurred performing the Consortium's FEED study. This information is provided with the aim of enabling potential developers of CCS projects to estimate up front FEED costs. A detailed cost breakdown is also provided for each of the key parties within the Consortium in the form of Cost, Time and Resource (CTR) information in PDFs below, under the following references: UKCCS - KT - S1.0 - SP - 001 ScottishPower CTR Summary; UKCCS - KT - S1.0 - ACC - 001 Aker Clean Carbon CTR Summary; UKCCS - KT - S1.0 - NG - 001 National Grid CTR Summary; UKCCS - KT - S1.0 - Shell - 001 Shell CTR Summary; The detailed CTR information provides a breakdown of the actual labour effort used for the totality of the FEED scope of work, presented by month and by CTR activity, the type of expertise used, the number of hours worked and the associated costs. The split between internal and external costs is shown, together with the original budget estimates developed for each CTR prior to commencing FEED. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (FEED cost.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/feed_cost/feed_cost.aspx

  • This is a generic powerpoint showing results from azimuthal Q analysis of seismic data collected during the JC152 cruise (Bull et al., 2018). The presentation gives an introduction to the CHIMNEY project and study area. Data from 2 sources (GI guns and Surface sparker) are analysed, giving rise to measurements of attenuation as a function of two-wave time, azimuth and frequency at two locations. The data are inverted using a rock physics model, and probability distributions for matrix permeability and fracture size at the two sites are developed. Reference: Bull, J. M. (2018). Cruise Report – RRS James Cook JC152: CHIMNEY - Characterisation of Major Overburden Pathways above Sub-seafloor CO2 Storage Reservoirs in the North Sea Scanner and Challenger Pockmark Complexes,University of Southampton, 55 pp. Available at: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/420257/ NERC Grant - Characterization of major overburden leakage pathways above sub-seafloor CO2 storage reservoirs in the North Sea (CHIMNEY)

  • In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report illustrates how the End-to-End CCS chain must be considered as a system as well as separate elements. It builds upon the description of the individual elements contained in Section 3, and captures the development of the End-to-End CCS chain design carried out during FEED. Specifically, this section focuses on the following aspects: Commissioning the system in preparation for operations, as well as decommissioning at the end of the capture and storage period; Operations and maintenance activities; Control; Metering and monitoring; Venting; This section also provides some selected information on the individual CCS chain elements and a summary of the RAM (reliability, availability and maintainability) analysis undertaken during FEED of which one of the key outputs was the anticipated CO2 injection profile for the project. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (End to end CCS chain operation.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/ccs_chain/ccs_chain.aspx

  • During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter presents the results of studies into the undersea storage reservoir for CO2, in the Lower Bunter sandstone of the depleted Hewett natural gas field, the design recommendations for new wells and recommendations for abandonment of existing wells. The study addresses the following areas; Storage Reservoir integrity and capacity; Construction and completion of wells; CO2 properties and injectivity; Abandonment of existing and new wells; Monitoring; Hazard Identification (HAZID) and Risk Assessment. Some of the key aspects of the Wells and Storage technical design are; Wells that have already been abandoned using conventional methods pose a risk of future leakage to the surface and thereby compromising the integrity of the CO2 store; Data acquisition can be difficult: ensure that all required data sets are identified and make requests as early as possible to ensure quality data is obtained resistant standards; The CO2 equation of state and phase diagram is paramount in designing the injection process. Temperature and pressure of the CO2 must be carefully specified to avoid uncontrolled condensation or vaporisation; Many standard components and materials used in the offshore industry are suitable for use in CO2 flowing regime injection applications. Particular attention must be paid to corrosion resistance and longevity in a CO2 environment; For drilling injection wells into a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir, the principal challenge is drilling into low pore pressures, whilst minimising formation damage. Further supporting documents for Chapter 7 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/e_on_feed_/storage/storage.aspx

  • During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This Key Knowledge Reference Book is the result of the early stages of a Front End Engineering and Design (FEED) study to add a post-combustion Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) facility to a new supercritical coal fired power plant at Kingsnorth following the award of a FEED contract with the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) in March 2010. This study constitutes the first phase of a 3-phase approach to FEED adopted by E.ON UK. The Kingsnorth CCS Project consists of two 800MW power generating units at Kingsnorth power station, a 300MW (net) post combustion carbon capture plant integrated into the power plant with associated dehydration and compression facilities, a 36inch pipeline for transportation of CO2 to the Hewett gas field in the southern North Sea and a new platform at this field with associated injection facilities and wells. The Key Knowledge Reference Book is publicly available to all CCS project developers and other interested parties to ensure the lessons learned from this FEED are disseminated as widely as possible to advance the roll-out of Carbon Capture and Storage. This Key Knowledge Reference Book comprises information provided in the following structure: Chapter: 1 Executive Summary. 2 Content. 3 Table of Acronyms. 4 Project Design. 5 Technical Design - Carbon Capture and Compression Plant. 6 Technical Design - Pipeline and Platform. 7 Technical Design - Wells and Storage. 8 Health and Safety. 9 Environment and Consents. 10 Project Management Reports. Summary commentary on each of the chapters is provided to give both context to the information supplied and to pull out key areas of learning in each section. The Key Knowledge Reference Book is available for download and supporting materials for each chapter are available. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/e_on_feed_/executive_summ/executive_summ.aspx

  • Geomorphological map of the Sutlej and Yamuna fans, northwestern India. Grant abstract: India is the largest agricultural user of groundwater in the world. The last 40 years has seen a revolutionary shift from large-scale surface water management to widespread groundwater abstraction, particularly in the northwestern states of Punjab, Haryana and Rajasthan. As a result of this, northwestern India is now a hotspot of groundwater depletion, with 'the largest rate of groundwater loss in any comparable-sized region on Earth' (Tiwari et al., 2009). This unsustainable use of groundwater becomes even more challenging when set increasing demands from a burgeoning population and industrialisation, together with potential but poorly understood effects of climate-driven changes in the water cycle. There are a number of innovative socio-economic strategies that can address this issue, including enhanced recharge and subsurface water storage, but their implementation and success depend on solid regional understanding of the geology and hydrogeology of the aquifer systems, and of the patterns and rates of groundwater flow and recharge. What we know about regional groundwater resources comes largely from either low-resolution studies based on satellite data, or from local investigations; there has been no large-scale, cross-state integrated study of the groundwater system. Groundwater in northwestern India is thought to be largely hosted within buried, sandy former river channels, which extend from the Himalayas toward the southwest and are separated by fine-grained muds. Only a few channels are visible at the surface; most are buried and their existence must be inferred. Our approach is founded on the premise that we must first understand the geology and geometry of the aquifer system before we can hope to estimate the way it will respond to a complex set of future stresses. This means that we must be able to describe the locations, sizes, and characteristics of these channels as well as their age and three-dimensional pattern. Once these characteristics are determined, we can forecast the likely future behaviour of the system. In this proposal, we will provide, for the first time, a regional assessment of the aquifer system in northwestern India, along with models for its evolution under changes in the water cycle and in the way in which groundwater is used. Our project will combine expertise in sedimentology, stratigraphy, sediment routing and basin evolution, hydrology, and isotope geochemistry to understand the geological framework of the aquifer system, the ages of the groundwaters within it, and the ways in which groundwater levels are likely to evolve over the next 50 years. The outcomes of the proposal will include (1) a comprehensive data base that covers the northwestern Indian aquifer system, (2) much better understanding of regional sources, ages, and flow rates of groundwater, and (3) a suite of predictions for how the groundwater system will respond to a range of different future scenarios.