Format

PDF

67 record(s)

 

Type of resources

Keywords

Topics

INSPIRE themes

Contact for the resource

Provided by

Years

Formats

Representation types

Update frequencies

Scale

Resolution

From 1 - 10 / 67
  • Geomorphological map of the Sutlej and Yamuna fans, northwestern India. Grant abstract: India is the largest agricultural user of groundwater in the world. The last 40 years has seen a revolutionary shift from large-scale surface water management to widespread groundwater abstraction, particularly in the northwestern states of Punjab, Haryana and Rajasthan. As a result of this, northwestern India is now a hotspot of groundwater depletion, with 'the largest rate of groundwater loss in any comparable-sized region on Earth' (Tiwari et al., 2009). This unsustainable use of groundwater becomes even more challenging when set increasing demands from a burgeoning population and industrialisation, together with potential but poorly understood effects of climate-driven changes in the water cycle. There are a number of innovative socio-economic strategies that can address this issue, including enhanced recharge and subsurface water storage, but their implementation and success depend on solid regional understanding of the geology and hydrogeology of the aquifer systems, and of the patterns and rates of groundwater flow and recharge. What we know about regional groundwater resources comes largely from either low-resolution studies based on satellite data, or from local investigations; there has been no large-scale, cross-state integrated study of the groundwater system. Groundwater in northwestern India is thought to be largely hosted within buried, sandy former river channels, which extend from the Himalayas toward the southwest and are separated by fine-grained muds. Only a few channels are visible at the surface; most are buried and their existence must be inferred. Our approach is founded on the premise that we must first understand the geology and geometry of the aquifer system before we can hope to estimate the way it will respond to a complex set of future stresses. This means that we must be able to describe the locations, sizes, and characteristics of these channels as well as their age and three-dimensional pattern. Once these characteristics are determined, we can forecast the likely future behaviour of the system. In this proposal, we will provide, for the first time, a regional assessment of the aquifer system in northwestern India, along with models for its evolution under changes in the water cycle and in the way in which groundwater is used. Our project will combine expertise in sedimentology, stratigraphy, sediment routing and basin evolution, hydrology, and isotope geochemistry to understand the geological framework of the aquifer system, the ages of the groundwaters within it, and the ways in which groundwater levels are likely to evolve over the next 50 years. The outcomes of the proposal will include (1) a comprehensive data base that covers the northwestern Indian aquifer system, (2) much better understanding of regional sources, ages, and flow rates of groundwater, and (3) a suite of predictions for how the groundwater system will respond to a range of different future scenarios.

  • QICS (Quantifying and monitoring environmental impacts of geological carbon storage) was a program funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), with support from the Scottish Government (May 2010 - December 2014) with two objectives. Firstly, to assess if any significant environmental impact would arise, if a leak from sub-sea, deep geological storage of carbon dioxide occurred. Secondly, to test and recommend tools and strategies for monitoring for (or assuring the absence of) leakage at the sea floor and in overlying waters. This data set provides a short overview of the novel experimental procedure - a world first leakage simulation in the natural environment and describes the experimental set up, sampling strategy including both temporal and spatial details. The data set consists of a pdf containing a text based project and experimental overview, a table outlining the temporal evolution of the experiment, including site selection, set up, baseline, impact and recovery phases and a diagram outlining the spatial sampling strategy. This data set contains an overview document collated by Plymouth Marine Laboratory. This provides the context for a number of specific related QICS datasets submitted to the UKCCS data archive, covering a range of geological, chemical and ecological information. QICS project website: www.bgs.ac.uk/qics/home.html. Blackford et al., 2014. Detection and impacts of leakage from sub-seafloor deep geological carbon dioxide storage. Nature Climate Change 4, 1011-1016. DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE2381. Taylor et al., 2015. A novel sub-seabed CO2 release experiment informing monitoring and impact assessment for geological carbon storage. Int J Greenhouse Gas Control. DOI:10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.09.007.

  • Teesside Collective is a cluster of leading industries with a shared vision: to establish Teesside as the go-to location for future clean industrial development by creating Europe’s first Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) equipped industrial zone. The Teesside Collective reports and publications including the Blueprint for Industrial CCS in the UK can be accessed from http://www.teessidecollective.co.uk/category/reports-publications/.

  • Publication associated with NERC grant NE/I014039/1. In this paper, we discuss how the initial stages of mass gain are affected by the specific surface area (SSA) of the ceramic material. The paper provides guidance on experimental protocols to avoid dating results being distorted by relatively early-time mass gain data.

  • During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter contains design philosophy documents which were produced to ensure a common approach to the design of all aspects of the CCS project, addressing overall project lifecycle and the interface between the Carbon Capture Plant and the Power Station. Some of the key issues concerning the design and integration of a CCS development are: Power plants have been designed for many years to operate flexibly in response to the demands of the electricity network. The CCS plant technology is closer to process plant technology which is not usually designed for such flexible operation, and this will provide a key challenge during the detailed design process to provide the required flexibility of operation; Assessment of various cooling technologies for the power station and carbon capture plant shows that direct water cooling is the Best Available Technology in terms of Environmental Impact; Significant parts of the existing cooling water infrastructure can be re-used; There is potential to advantageously interface steam and cooling systems between the power plant and CCS plant; Venting, and the consequent cooling, of CO2 for pressure relief or operational reasons raises issues with lack of buoyancy and dispersion which require significant further work. Further supporting documents for chapter 4 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/e_on_feed_/project_design/project_design.aspx

  • During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a preliminary Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study has yielded invaluable knowledge on areas including project design, technical design, health and safety, environment, consents and project management. The E.ON UK FEED study material is available for download.

  • During 2010-11, as part of the Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) Demonstration Competition process, E.ON undertook a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) study for the development of a commercial scale CCS demonstration plant at Kingsnorth in Kent, South East England. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material is available for download here. This chapter contains the output from many of the Project Management processes which control and report the progress of the FEED. The following commentary gives the reader a brief guide to the project management process or approach which has been used. FEED Programme: In order to scope out, control and report the FEED activity, a Work Breakdown Structure was developed. This structure had the following hierarchy - Level 1 - Chain Element; Level 2 - Phase; Level 3 - Discipline; Level 4 - Work Package (including Cost Time Resource definition); The programme is in the form of a fully resource loaded, logically linked network diagram. Risk Management: Throughout this FEED the management of risk was a key activity. This has helped inform and better understand the important risks faced by the project. This 'first of a kind' project saw a large number of new risks being identified, assessed, controlled and monitored during FEED. Project Cost Estimates: An estimating philosophy was established in FEED to set the standards for the estimates produced from across the project participants, including: To ensure a consistent approach in the collection, calculation and presentation of costs across all FEED Participants; To ensure that all likely project costs are identified and captured along with all associated details. A standard template was established for each participant to complete with the details of their section (i.e. Chain Element) of the cost estimate. The cost estimate was broadly consistent with Class 3/4 estimate as defined by AACE. Further supporting documents for chapter 10 of the Key Knowledge Reference Book can be downloaded. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/e_on_feed_/project_manage/project_manage.aspx

  • In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland through to construction. The study yielded invaluable knowledge and the resulting material are available for download here. This section of the report provides details of the regulatory work carried out during FEED to achieve the legal requirements of constructing and operating an End-to-End CCS system within European, UK and Scottish legislative frameworks, including implications for consenting of the power plant from which CO2 is to be captured. During the development of the Outline Solution for the UKCCS Demonstration Competition, the Consortium developed a comprehensive Consents Register that tracks month by month progress and captures all relevant Consents, permits and licenses required by the End-to-End CCS chain. A summary of the Consortium progress as of the end of Q1 2011 is provided. Written against a backdrop of significant regulatory change and uncertainty, this report also outlines the process undertaken in identifying consenting risk and provides commentary on the key risks identified, as contained within the project Risk Register. The appropriate summary section from the Feed Close Out Report can be downloaded as a PDF (Consents and permitting.pdf). The main text of the FEED Close Out Report, together with the supporting appendix for this section can be downloaded as PDF files. Note this dataset is a duplicate of the reports held at the National Archive which can be found at the following link - http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20121217150421/http://decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/emissions/ccs/ukccscomm_prog/feed/scottish_power/consents/consents.aspx

  • The UK government is committed to sharing the knowledge from the UK CCS projects. Under the 2013/2014 Front End Engineering and Design (FEED) contracts, the Peterhead (Goldeneye) and White Rose CCS projects delivered 86 reports. Under FEED, the completed reports are defined as Key Knowledge Deliverables (KKDs). The reports will enable both the Peterhead and White Rose projects to share the knowledge and learning acquired on their respective CCS projects. These Key Knowledge Deliverables from these FEED studies will cover many aspects of delivering a large scale commercial CCS project. This will include: commercial and financing arrangements; programme and risk management; consents and permitting; technical design, engineering and integration; health and safety; and lessons learnt. The KKDs will be published by DECC during 2015 and 2016. The reports can be accessed from https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/carbon-capture-and-storage-knowledge-sharing.

  • In March 2010, the Scottish CCS (Carbon Capture & Storage) Consortium began an extensive Front End, Engineering and Design (FEED) study to assess what exactly would be required from an engineering, commercial and regulatory, perspective in order to progress the CCS demonstration project at Longannet Power station in Scotland (Goldeneye) through to construction. The study has yielded invaluable knowledge in areas such as cost, design, end-to-end CCS chain operation, health and safety, environment, consent and permitting, risk management, and lessons learnt. The ScottishPower CCS Consortium FEED study material are available for download.