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  • Technical report, component of ‘Progressing Scotland’s CO2 storage opportunities’ 2010. Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage is a very active field of research, especially for the past decade. From the UK perspective, a commercially crucial aspect is the saline aquifer research, since there are predicted to be vast storage capacities in the sedimentary formations of the North Sea. The report reviews the ongoing work on practical injections of CO2 as research tests for storage projects and specifically focuses on industrial sized saline aquifer injections. Available for download at http://hdl.handle.net/1842/15681.

  • In this study, two strategies, thermal pretreatment and chemical doping, were investigated as a method of improving the residual carrying capacity of Longcliffe and Havelock limestone for calcium looping systems. Four parameters were varied during thermal pretreatment: temperature (900-1100 degrees C), time (3-12 hr), gas composition (0-100 % CO2 balanced in N2) and particle size (90-355 micrometre). After pre-calcination, the sorbents were subjected to 20 carbonation-calcination cycles performed in a thermographic analyser (TGA) to monitor any signs of sorbent improvement. The degradation of sorbent activity was modelled using the decay equation suggested by Grasa and Abanades (2006). Both Longcliffe and Havelock samples showed self-reactivation when pretreated under CO2, however this did not result in a greater carrying capacity after 20 carbonation/calcination cycles compared to the untreated limestone. For chemical doping, Longcliffe doped using 0.167 mol % HBr via quantitative wet impregnation method resulted in an increase in residual carrying capacity of 27.4 % after thermal pre-treatment under CO2 when compared to the untreated but doped limestone, assuming self-reactivation continued as modelled. When Longcliffe was doped and then pretreated under pure N2, the limestone showed self-reactivation, which was not seen in the undoped sorbent when also pretreated under N2. Thus, the success of pretreatment may be dependent on the chemical composition of the limestone. Finally, BET surface area and BJH pore volume analysis was used to understand the changes in the sorbents' morphologies. The closure of the mesopores (dpore<150 nm) after the pretreatment was correlated to the self-reactivation in the subsequent cycles.

  • The CO2 storage operation at Sleipner in the Norwegian North Sea provides an excellent demonstration of the application of time-lapse surface seismic methods to CO2 plume monitoring under favorable conditions. Injection commenced at Sleipner in 1996 with CO2 separated from natural gas being injected into the Utsira Sand, a major saline aquifer of late Cenozoic age. CO2 injection is via a near-horizontal well at a depth of about 1012 m below sea level (bsl) some 200 m below the reservoir top, at a rate approaching 1 million tonnes (Mt) per year, with more than 11 Mt currently stored. The report can be downloaded at http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/9418/.

  • UKGEOS and Core Sample Analysis. Geomechanical testing was performed to determine triaxial compressional strength, tensile strength, frictional strength and permeability of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones and coals from eleven depth intervals within the GGC01 borehole, UK Geoenergy Observatories (UKGEOS), Glasgow, United Kingdom. Frictional strength tests were also performed on cuttings samples of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones and coals from the GGA08 borehole, Glasgow, United Kingdom. In total twenty-three tensile strength tests were performed on ten sampled intervals, and seven porosity measurements pre-and post-failure were taken. Nine triaxial compressive strength tests and twenty-one frictional strength tests were performed, with permeability measured both before and after failure or shear respectively. From compressive strength tests we also determined the Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. Results of X-Ray Diffraction are also included in the dataset.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, The Development and Demonstration of Best Practice Guidelines for the Safe Start-up Injection of CO2 into Depleted Gas Fields, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-183.

  • Technical report from CO2MultiStore project, component of ‘Optimising CO2 storage in geological formations: a case study offshore Scotland, September 2015. The report captures knowledge gained from the process, progress and findings of the research that is applicable to the development of any multi-user storage resource. Available for download at http://hdl.handle.net/1842/16475.

  • Revised full proposal cover sheet for scientific drilling (852-CPP2) 'GlaciStore: Understanding Pleistocene glaciation and basin processes and their impact on fluid migration pathways (North Sea)', submitted to Integrated Ocean Discovery Programme (IODP) April 2016. The full proposal cover sheet document is publicly available from IODP; the submitted full proposal document is restricted to the proponents for publication and for review and response from IODP. The proposal is a revision of full proposal 852-CPP in response to review by IODP. The lead submitter, on behalf to the GlaciStore consortium is Heather Stewart, British Geological Survey (BGS).The 32 proponents are from research and industry organisations in the UK, Norway, USA and Canada (BGS, Institute for Energy Technology, Lundin Norway AS, Memorial University of Newfoundland, SINTEF Energy Research, Statoil ASA, University of Bergen, University of Edinburgh, University of Oslo and University of Ottawa University of Texas at Austin). The revised full proposal cover sheet states the names of proponents of the 'GlaciStore' consortium and details for the lead submitter of the bid. The full proposal cover sheet comprises: an abstract of the submitted full proposal including description of project funding support as a Complementary Project Proposal: describes and states the scientific research objectives; summarises proposed non-standard measurements; tabulates details of the 13 proposed drill sites (revised from full proposal CPP-852) to address the scientific objectives. The objectives are to investigate: glacial history and sedimentary architecture; fluid flow and microbial processes in shallow sediments; and the stress history and geomechanical models for strata that have experienced multiple glacial and interglacial cycles. The table of revised proposed drilling sites includes designation of primary or alternate sites, the co-ordinates of the position and water depth at each proposed site, the objective for drilling and sampling and the depth to achieve the objective. The proponents, their affiliation, expertise and role for the submission are listed. UKCCSRC Grant UKCCSRC-C1-30.

  • The RISCS guide summarises the conclusions and recommendations developed by the RISCS Consortium, based on four years of research into the potential impacts of leakage from CO2 storage sites. The report has been developed in parallel with the experimental research, field-based investigations, modelling studies and analysis undertaken during the RISCS project. The Report can be downloaded from http://www.riscs-co2.eu/UserFiles/file/RISCS_Guide/RISCS_Guide.pdf.

  • SCCS presentations, consultations, responses, briefings and communications on CCS and CO2 storage for the period 2005 - 2009

  • Technical report, January 2016. Development of a Scottish CO2 Hub can unlock the potential for CCS in the UK and Europe by providing early access for CO2 captured in the North Sea Region to extensive, well-characterised storage in the Central North Sea (CNS) at low risk, while creating value through CO2 utilisation. Available for download at http://hdl.handle.net/1842/15700.