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250000

60 record(s)

 

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  • This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the location of land and marine gravity observations on the UK mainland, Northern Ireland, offshore islands, tidal estuaries and seabed. Most of the surveys were carried out by the BGS but the database includes data originally acquired by other organisations and subsequently given to the BGS to be managed as part of the national archive. Complete coverage of the UK mainland with a station density of 1-2 stations per square kilometre. Unadjusted ship gravity, magnetic and bathymetry data acquired by BGS as part of its Offshore Reconnaisance Mapping Programme. Unadjusted ship gravity, magnetic and bathymetry data acquired by BGS as part of its Offshore Reconnaisance Mapping Programme. This programme commenced in 1967, and was funded mainly by the Department of Energy. Marine gravity readings are from unadjusted ship gravity and bathymetry data from various commercial and academic surveys between 1965 and 1994. Confidential M.O.D Hydrographic Office integrated ship gravity and magnetics surveys of NW Europe marine areas for which BGS acts as agent. Network adjusted gravity and magnetic compilations of data from BGS and non-BGS sources.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with type of mass movement e.g. landslip. The scale of the data is 1:10 000 scale. Onshore coverage is partial with approximately 30% of England, Scotland and Wales available in the version 2 data release. BGS intend to continue developing coverage at this scale; current focus is to include all large priority urban areas, along with road and rail transport corridors. Mass movement describes areas where deposits have moved down slope under gravity to form landslips. These landslips can affect bedrock, superficial or artificial ground. Mass movement deposits are described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme Volume 4. However the data also includes foundered strata, where ground has collapsed due to subsidence (this is not described in the Rock Classification Scheme). Caution should be exercised with this data; historically BGS has not always recorded mass movement events and due to the dynamic nature of occurrence significant changes may have occurred since the data was released. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:50 000 scale providing bedrock geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. The bedrock geology of Great Britain is very diverse and includes three broad classes based on their mode of origin: igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary. The data includes attribution to identify each rock type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volumes 1-3 ). The bedrock has formed over long periods of geological time, from the Archean eon some 7500 million years ago, to the relatively young Pliocene, 58 million years ago. The age of the rocks is identified in the data through their BGS lexicon name (published for each deposit at the time of the original survey or subsequent digital data creation). For stratified rocks i.e. arranged in sequence, this will usually be of a lithostratigraphic type. Other rock types for example intrusive igneous bodies will be of a lithodemic type. More information on the formal naming of UK rocks is available in the BGS Lexicon of Named Rock Units. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition, using visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN **This dataset was created for the "Britain beneath our feet" atlas using information extracted from the Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environment (G-BASE) For The UK . For Uranium in stream sediment data please see Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environment (G-BASE) For The UK ** Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environment (G-BASE) coverage for Uranium in stream sediment. The G-BASE programme involves systematic sampling and the determination of chemical elements in samples of stream sediment, stream water and, locally, soil, to build up a picture of the surface chemistry of the UK. The average sample density for stream sediments and water is about one site per 1.5-2km square. Analytical precision is high with strict quality control to ensure countrywide consistency. Results have been standardised to ensure seamless joins between geochemical sampling campaigns. The data provide baseline information on the natural abundances of elements, against which anomalous values due to such factors as mineralisation and industrial contamination may be compared.

  • Data identifying linear features (shown as polylines) representing geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised set of linear features. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland, and the Isle of Man. Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The digital data are attributed by fault type; two categories of fault are described in the data: contact and non-contact faults. Contact faults form a boundary between two different rock types whilst non-contact faults indicate a fault displacement within the same rock. The data has been generalised and shows only the location of major faults. All faults shown are inferred i.e. not exposed or seen at a locality, but derived from other evidence including linear depressions in the landscape, the truncation or displacement of topographical features. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • Faeroe-Iceland Ridge Experiment (FIRE) was acquired by BIRPS (the British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate). The primary target was anomalously thick oceanic crust along the Faeroe-Iceland Ridge that was possibly formed by underplating due to the proximity of the Iceland hotspot. FIRE made use of 110 land seismometers to record the airgun shots. The resulting velocity models and reflector geometries have proved critical in interpretation of variations in crustal volumes along the ridge. The data were recorded to 23 s two-way time.

  • This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the locations of over 12,500 rock samples from the land area of the United Kingdom gathered as part of the Mineral Reconnaissance Programme (MRP). The Mineral Reconnaissance Programme (MRP), funded by the DTI, carried out baseline mineral exploration in Great Britain between 1972 and 1997. The programme has been subsumed into the new BGS Minerals Programme, also funded by the DTI. The rock samples have been analysed for a variety of major and trace elements, mainly by XRF.

  • THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN **This dataset was created for the "Britain beneath our feet" atlas using information extracted from the Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environment (G-BASE) For The UK . For acidity of stream water data please see Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environment (G-BASE) For The UK ** Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environment (G-BASE) coverage for acidity of stream water. The G-BASE programme involves systematic sampling and the determination of chemical elements in samples of stream sediment, stream water and, locally, soil, to build up a picture of the surface chemistry of the UK. The average sample density for stream sediments and water is about one site per 1.5-2km square. Analytical precision is high with strict quality control to ensure countrywide consistency. Results have been standardised to ensure seamless joins between geochemical sampling campaigns. The data provide baseline information on the natural abundances of elements, against which anomalous values due to such factors as mineralisation and industrial contamination may be compared.

  • The British Geological Survey hold a collection of data recorded during marine geophysical surveys which includes digital data and analogue records. These data result from approximately 350,000 line kilometres of multi-instrument geophysical survey lines. The data include seismic, sonar, magnetic, gravity, echo sounder, multibeam bathymetry and navigation data. The seismic data are mainly for airgun, sparker, boomer and pinger. The data were primarily collected by BGS and the collection also includes additional third party data. The data are primarily from the UKCS (United Kingdom Continental Shelf). The data are stored within the National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) and the Marine Environmental Data and Information Network (MEDIN) Data Archive Centre (DAC) for Geology and Geophysics. The majority of legacy geophysical paper records are available as scanned images viewable via the BGS Offshore GeoIndex www.bgs.ac.uk/GeoIndex/offshore.htm. Other records can be scanned on request. Older records are of variable quality. Data not yet available online including segy are available on request enquiries@bgs.ac.uk. The data are applicable to a wide range of uses including environmental, geotechnical, geophysical and geological studies. Reference: Fannin, NGT. (1989) Offshore Investigations 1966-87. British Geological Survey Technical Report WB/89/2, British Geological Survey.

  • In 1992, BIRPS joined with the Indonesian Marine Geological Institute to record two long multichannel normal-incidence reflection profiles, one of which is DAMAR, the other TIMOR, and one short profile (API) close to the volcano Gunung Api. The survey provides a modern analogue to tectonics hypothesized to have occurred across the Iapetus suture zone of northern England 450-400 Ma. The Banda Arc of Indonesia near the island of Timor is widely recognized as the premier example of the active subduction of continental crust and lithosphere beneath oceanic lithosphere. The crossing of a modern island arc and close passage to active volcanoes was intended to image reflections associated with magma in the crust and uppermost mantle.