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  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Data are supplied as two themes: bedrock and linear features (faults), there is no superficial, mass movement or artificial theme available onshore at this scale. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. This means rock bodies are arranged into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Data identifying linear features (shown as polylines) represent geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The faults theme defines geological faults (shown as polylines) at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • The British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate (BIRPS) shot approximately 12,000 km of deep, multi-channel seismic reflection data around the British Isles from 1981 to 1991 during 14 surveys. Recording depths vary depending on the purpose of the survey but range from 15 s to 40 s two-way time. Raw and processed digital data are archived by BGS who make the data available subject to the cost of reproduction and handling. Seismic sections and other analogue ancillary data are available for some surveys. Gravity and magnetic data may also be available.

  • The data consist of the results of geotechnical testing carried out at various depth intervals on shallow cores or boreholes collected BGS from the UK Continental Shelf. The bulk of the data north of 56N are in digital form and result from testing carried out on board survey vessels using hand-held test equipment (penetrometers and shear vanes). These values are averaged for each test interval, and are expressed in kiloPascals. There are approximately 6000 test results in the data set. Some more detailed test information, in non-digital and report form is held for selected sites. Also for most sites where digital data is not available, geological descriptions of core material will also contains semi-quantitative information on the stiffness of the material. Geotechnical knowledge is required to understand and interpret the results if they are to be used as a basis for engineering studies. Core material are managed as part of the BGS Materials collection and are available for examination, testing or subsampling. The data are stored as part of the National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) and the Marine Environmental Data and Information Network (MEDIN) Data Archive Centre (DAC) for Geology and Geophysics. Data are delivered via BGS Offshore GeoIndex www.bgs.ac.uk/GeoIndex/offshore.htm geotechnical layers. Reference: Fannin, NGT. (1989) Offshore Investigations 1966-87. British Geological Survey Technical Report WB/89/2, British Geological Survey.

  • Regional Geochemical data from drainage basin reconnaissance survey carried out as part of a bilateral aid project between the UK Department for International development (DFID) (formerly ODA) and the Indonesian Government. Some 23,000 stream sediment samples collected and analysed (less than 80 mesh fraction) for Copper, Lead, Zinc, Cobalt, Nickel, Manganese, Silver, Arsenic, Molybdenum, Tin and Tungsten (partial extraction) and Lithium, Potassium, Chromium and Iron (total extraction). Samples collected and classified on the basis of 1:250 000 map quadrangle areas. Data gathering completed in two phases: First phase: North of the equator (North Sumatra Project, NSP). Second phase: South of the equator (Southern Sumatra Geological and mineral exploration Project). Sampling and analytical methodology has been consistent throughout. All data is available as on the Sumatra CD-database CD-ROM. North of the equator data published as 1:250 000 single element classified symbol plots and as a monochrome geochemical atlas. South of the equator data published as 1:250 000 single element proportional symbol plots and a geochemical atlas (hardcopy and CD-ROM). Projects also involved regional geological mapping and in Southern Sumatra regional geophysics (gravity). Raw data can be obtained from the Directorate of Mineral Resources, Bandung, Indonesia.

  • Faeroe-Iceland Ridge Experiment (FIRE) was acquired by BIRPS (the British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate). The primary target was anomalously thick oceanic crust along the Faeroe-Iceland Ridge that was possibly formed by underplating due to the proximity of the Iceland hotspot. FIRE made use of 110 land seismometers to record the airgun shots. The resulting velocity models and reflector geometries have proved critical in interpretation of variations in crustal volumes along the ridge. The data were recorded to 23 s two-way time.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:25 000 scale. Onshore coverage is partial and BGS has no intention to create a national coverage at this scale. Areas covered are essentially special areas of 'classic' geology and include Llandovery (central Wales), Coniston (Lake District) and Cuillan Hills (Isle of Skye). Superficial deposits are the youngest geological deposits formed during the most recent period of geological time, the Quaternary, which extends back about 2.58 million years from the present. They lie on top of older deposits or rocks referred to as bedrock. Superficial deposits were laid down by various natural processes such as action by ice, water, wind and weathering. As such, the deposits are denoted by their BGS lexicon name, which classifies them on the basis of mode of origin (lithogenesis) with names such as, 'glacial deposits', 'river terrace deposits' or 'blown sand'; or on the basis of their composition such as 'peat'. Most of these superficial deposits are unconsolidated sediments such as gravel, sand, silt and clay. The digital data includes attribution to identify each deposit type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volume 4). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • The 3D multi channel seismic data were acquired as part of a collaborative investigation into models of magmatic segmentation between the Scripps Institute of Oceanography and BIRPS (the British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate). The 3D EPR (East Pacific Rise) ARAD (Anatomy of a Ridge Axis Discontinuity) EW9707 cruise was undertaken in September and October 1997 to provide both refelction and wide-angle seismic data for the study of the overlapping spreading centre (OSC) at 9 degrees 3 minutes N on the East Pacific Rise. The data were acquired with a single source and a single streamer with a nominal line spacing of 100 m. The 3D-EPR ARAD survey was a joint NERC/NSF (US National Science Foundation) funded project and the copyright for this survey is held jointly. Reference: Bazin, S. Harding, AJ. et al. (2001) Three-dimensional shallow crustal emplacement at the 9 degree 03 minute N overlapping spreading center on the East Pacific Rise, Journal of Geophysical Research.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:250 000 scale providing a generalised geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. The bedrock geology of Great Britain is very diverse and includes three broad classes based on their mode of origin: igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary. The data includes attribution to identify each rock type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volumes 1-3 ). The bedrock has formed over long periods of geological time, from the Archean eon some 7500 million years ago, to the relatively young Pliocene, 58 million years ago. The age of the rocks is identified in the data through their BGS lexicon name (published for each deposit at the time of the original survey or subsequent digital data creation). For stratified rocks i.e. arranged in sequence, this will usually be of a lithostratigraphic type. Other rock types for example intrusive igneous bodies will be of a lithodemic type. More information on the formal naming of UK rocks is available in the BGS Lexicon of Named Rock Units. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition, using visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the location of land and marine gravity observations on the UK mainland, Northern Ireland, offshore islands, tidal estuaries and seabed. Most of the surveys were carried out by the BGS but the database includes data originally acquired by other organisations and subsequently given to the BGS to be managed as part of the national archive. Complete coverage of the UK mainland with a station density of 1-2 stations per square kilometre. Unadjusted ship gravity, magnetic and bathymetry data acquired by BGS as part of its Offshore Reconnaisance Mapping Programme. Unadjusted ship gravity, magnetic and bathymetry data acquired by BGS as part of its Offshore Reconnaisance Mapping Programme. This programme commenced in 1967, and was funded mainly by the Department of Energy. Marine gravity readings are from unadjusted ship gravity and bathymetry data from various commercial and academic surveys between 1965 and 1994. Confidential M.O.D Hydrographic Office integrated ship gravity and magnetics surveys of NW Europe marine areas for which BGS acts as agent. Network adjusted gravity and magnetic compilations of data from BGS and non-BGS sources.

  • The BGS Seabed Sediments 250k dataset is vector data is vector data which reflects the distribution of seabed substrate types of the UK and some of its adjacent waters at 1:250,000 scale. This comprehensive product provides a digital compilation of the paper maps published by BGS at the same scale, as well as, additional re-interpretations from regional geological studies. The seabed is commonly covered by sediments that form a veneer or thicker superficial layer of unconsolidated material above the bedrock. These sediments are classified based on their grain size reflecting the environment in which were deposited. This information is important to a range of stakeholders, including marine habitat mappers, marine spatial planners, offshore industries (in particular, the dredging and aggregate industries). This dataset was primarily based on seabed grab samples of the top 0.1 m, combined with cores, dredge samples and sidescan sonar acquired during mapping surveys since the early 1970s. The variations in data density will be reflected in the detail of the mapping.