Creation year

1998

265 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 265
  • This dataset consists of invertebrate species records, sampled from headwater streams during a survey in 1998. Macro-invertebrates were sampled using standard protocols. The sample area in each stream was a single area of stream-bed whose major habitat types can be sampled within the recommended sampling period of three minutes of active sampling, supplemented by a one minute hand search. The length of river surveyed would normally vary from 5 to 15m. Samples were collected using a standard 1mm mesh pond net and returned to the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (formerly Institute of Freshwater Ecology) for later sorting and identification. Supplemental physical measurements (width, depth, substrate composition) required to run RIVPACS (River Invertebrate Prediction and Classification System) were taken. Data were collected under the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project managed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Headwater stream surveys have been carried out in 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of sites. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to headwater stream data, soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data and linear habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/fd0ce233-3b4d-4a5e-abcb-c0a26dd71c95

  • River Habitat Survey (RHS) data from rivers and streams surveyed in 1998 as part of the Countryside Survey project. River Habitat Survey (RHS) is an assessment of the physical structure of freshwater streams and rivers based on a standard 500m length sample unit. It does not require specialist geomorphological or botanical expertise but consistent recognition of features included on the form is essential. To ensure consistency of recording all surveyors must be accredited, and recording follows standard protocols. Data were collected under the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project managed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Headwater stream surveys have been carried out in 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of sites. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to headwater stream data, soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data and linear habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2b285f04-ffd1-4da4-a742-0306e7a8e40c

  • This dataset consists of results of chemical analyses of single water chemistry samples, taken from headwater streams during a survey in 1998. Water samples were analysed at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology for chemical analysis of alkalinity (at pH 8.3) and soluble reactive phosphorus. Conductivity and pH were measured in the field using a regularly calibrated field meter. Data were collected under the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project managed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Headwater stream surveys have been carried out in 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of sites. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to headwater stream data, soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data and linear habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b8052165-c6c5-427e-a90c-c536ff46aec8

  • This dataset consists of macrophyte species records, sampled from headwater streams during a survey in 1998. Stream macrophytes in Countryside Survey are surveyed using the standard MTR (Mean Trophic Rank) protocol, which records the presence and extent (on a categorical scale) of macrophytes in a 100m reach. Data were collected under the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project managed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Headwater stream surveys have been carried out in 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of sites. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to headwater stream data, soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data and linear habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e0b638d5-8271-4442-97ef-cf46ea220f5d

  • The BGS collection of downhole CCTV (Closed Circuit Television) recordings and backup tapes for worldwide SKYLAB satellite imagery. CCTV recordings carried out down boreholes, mainly drilled for water, were undertaken by BGS for specific commercial contracts in Great Britain, and may also have associated geophysical data. The collection started in 1997, and the present holdings are 138 videos, with infrequent additions. Video recordings on other topics may be added.

  • Index, set up in 1998, to the archive collection of reports, notebooks interpretations, plans and other geological or related data received from external organisations that are not part of other collections. These cover a wide variety of different types and ages of information mainly from Great Britain but some related to BGS projects overseas.

  • The WellMaster database holds hydrogeological information on water wells for wells and boreholes identified within the Single Onshore Borehole Index (SOBI) within England Wales and Scotland. The database contains index details supplementary to SOBI, including information on the availability of more detailed hydrogeological information. Four main categories of data are held within the database; lithostratigraphic details, well/borehole construction including casing and screens, water information including depths and pumping rates and water quality information.

  • Contains digitised mine plan contours, spot heights and worked ground outlines on key coal seams from the Midland Valley in ASCII or ArcView format. Incomplete, only some seams and some areas digitised. All contours digitised on key seams, worked ground outlines simplified, spot heights digitised where no contours exist.

  • The full title of this project is" Studies into metal speciation and bioavailability to assist risk assessment and remediation of brownfield sites in urban areas" and is funded by NERC under the URGENT thematic programme form 1998-2001. The project is being undertaken by a consortium of workers from the Imperial College, University of Nottingham, and the British Geological Survey. Innovative collaborative and multi-disciplinary research will be applied to the interpretation of urban geochemical maps and associated meta-datasets to assist decision making by local authorities in the redevelopment of brownfield sites. Source apportionment, speciation and bioavailability of potentially toxic heavy metals will be studied at representative conurbations in the UK Midlands region. Scanning electron microscopy, chemical extractions and soil solution and vegetable analysis, will be integrated with high precision isotopic analyses of Pb and other potential toxic metals in this study. The results will be available as maps in GIS format to provide a generic decision support system for quantitative health risk assessment.

  • Collection of reports, interpretations and records of research in British coalfield areas deposited by British Coal. Data for past and current collieries and for future prospects. Some 1000 linear feet (300m) of data. Information within the reports date from the 19th Century up to the present day.