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1998

265 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 265
  • The SACS Best Practice Manual consists of two parts. The first part outlines the operational experiences gained during the Sleipner CO2 injection operation. The second part consists of recommendations based on the monitoring the Sleipner CO2 injection operation during the SACS project. The report can be downloaded from http://www.ieaghg.org/docs/General_Docs/Reports/SACS%20Best%20Practise%20Manual.pdf.

  • The SACS and SACS2 projects ran sequentially from 1998 to 2002, with the aim of developing research into the potential for large-scale storage of CO2 in underground saline aquifer formations. SACS and SACS2, focussed specifically on scientific aspects of the Sleipner CO2 injection operation. As well as establishing protocols for conventional geological, geochemical and geophysical characterisation and monitoring, significant effort was put into evaluating requirements for the more holistic discipline of site risk assessment.

  • This dataset consists of results of chemical analyses of single water chemistry samples, taken from headwater streams during a survey in 1998. Water samples were analysed at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology for chemical analysis of alkalinity (at pH 8.3) and soluble reactive phosphorus. Conductivity and pH were measured in the field using a regularly calibrated field meter. Data were collected under the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project managed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Headwater stream surveys have been carried out in 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of sites. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to headwater stream data, soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data and linear habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b8052165-c6c5-427e-a90c-c536ff46aec8

  • Several coal resource maps for the whole of the UK have been produced by the British Geological Survey as a result of joint work with Department of Trade and Industry and the Coal Authority. The UK Coal Resource for new exploitation technologies map is a map of Britain depicting the spatial extent of the principal coal resources overlayed with existing workings and potential new technologies for accessing the resource. The map also shows the areas where coal and lignite are present at the surface and also where coal is buried at depth beneath younger rocks. The project covers all onshore coalfields in the UK, including Northern Ireland. It includes coal under estuaries and near-shore areas that can practically be reached by land-based directional drilling. No data more than 5 km offshore were considered. The maps are intended to be used for resource development, energy policy, strategic planning, land-use planning, the indication of hazard in mined areas, environment assessment and as a teaching aid. In addition to a summary map at 1:750000 scale for Britain data also exists for each technology of 21 individual regions or coal fields at a scale of 1:100000. The data was published in printed map form for the summary map, inkjet plots for the 42 individual maps and as PDF documents on CD. The maps were accompanied by BGS report CR/04/015N, "UK Coal Resource for New Technologies, Final Report". The work was initiated in April 2002 and completed in October 2003. The data was also simplified for inclusion in the Britain Beneath your Feet atlas 2005.

  • The joint PHE-BGS digital radon potential dataset provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in England and Wales. It will also allow an estimate to be made of the probability that an individual property in England and Wales is at or above the Action Level for radon. This information also provides an answer to one of the standard legal enquiries on house purchase in England and Wales, known as CON29 standard Enquiry of Local Authority; 3.13 Radon Gas: Location of the Property in a Radon Affected Area. The radon potential dataset will also provide information on the level of protection required for new buildings under as described in the latest Building Research Establishment guidance on radon protective measures for new buildings (BR 211 2007). This radon potential hazard information for England and Wales is based on Public Health England (PHE) indoor radon measurements and BGS digital geology information. This product was derived from DigMap50 V3.14 and PHE in-house radon measurement data. The indoor radon data is used with the agreement of the PHE. Confidentiality of measurement locations is maintained through data management practices. Access to the data is restricted. This dataset has been superseded by PHE-BGS Joint Radon Potential Dataset For Great Britain. Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. The Health Protection Agency recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average is at or above 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3). This is termed the Action Level. The Health Protection Agency defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration at or above the Action Level of 200 Bq m-3. The dataset was originally developed by BGS with the Health Protection Agency (HPA) which is now part of Public Health England.

  • The UK Sand and Gravel Database was compiled during the production of the Industrial Mineral Assessment Reports. The Department of the Environment commissioned this Report series from the British Geological Survey. Data collection extended from the first IMAU report in 1969 to the last report in 1990. The dataset is complete and is derived from reports with some additional boreholes that were never published. Standard procedures were adopted for whole project. Each report studied the sand and gravel resources of an area of between one hundred and two hundred square kilometres. Specially commissioned boreholes on a one kilometre grid basis were used in conjunction with existing geological knowledge to make a resource level assessment of the volume and quality of sand and gravel resource available. A total of 12,563 boreholes were drilled, 53,721 Lithological units described and 54,128 samples collected and graded. This information is presented in the appendixes of the individual reports and as a single database. Data collection is complete. Only factual corrections to the data are occasionally made. The dataset includes the borehole location, total depth, unit thickness, unit lithologies, and grading information.

  • The full title of this project is" Studies into metal speciation and bioavailability to assist risk assessment and remediation of brownfield sites in urban areas" and is funded by NERC under the URGENT thematic programme form 1998-2001. The project is being undertaken by a consortium of workers from the Imperial College, University of Nottingham, and the British Geological Survey. Innovative collaborative and multi-disciplinary research will be applied to the interpretation of urban geochemical maps and associated meta-datasets to assist decision making by local authorities in the redevelopment of brownfield sites. Source apportionment, speciation and bioavailability of potentially toxic heavy metals will be studied at representative conurbations in the UK Midlands region. Scanning electron microscopy, chemical extractions and soil solution and vegetable analysis, will be integrated with high precision isotopic analyses of Pb and other potential toxic metals in this study. The results will be available as maps in GIS format to provide a generic decision support system for quantitative health risk assessment.

  • River Habitat Survey (RHS) data from rivers and streams surveyed in 1998 as part of the Countryside Survey project. River Habitat Survey (RHS) is an assessment of the physical structure of freshwater streams and rivers based on a standard 500m length sample unit. It does not require specialist geomorphological or botanical expertise but consistent recognition of features included on the form is essential. To ensure consistency of recording all surveyors must be accredited, and recording follows standard protocols. Data were collected under the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project managed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Headwater stream surveys have been carried out in 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of sites. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to headwater stream data, soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data and linear habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2b285f04-ffd1-4da4-a742-0306e7a8e40c

  • Coal resource maps for the whole of the UK have been produced by the British Geological Survey as a result of joint work with Department of Trade and Industry and the Coal Authority. The Coal Resources Map is a Map of Britain depicting the spatial extent of the principal coal resources. The map shows the areas where coal and lignite are present at the surface and also where coal is buried at depth beneath younger rocks. The maps are intended to be used for resource development, energy policy, strategic planning, land-use planning, the indication of hazard in mined areas, environment assessment and as a teaching aid. In addition to a general map of coal resources for Britain data also exists for the six inset maps: Scotland; North-East; North-West; East Pennines; Lancashire, North Wales and the West Midlands; South Wales, Forest of Dean and Bristol. Available as a paper map, flat or folded, from BGS Sales or as a pdf on a CD if requested.

  • Collection of reports, interpretations and records of research in British coalfield areas deposited by British Coal. Data for past and current collieries and for future prospects. Some 1000 linear feet (300m) of data. Information within the reports date from the 19th Century up to the present day.