cl_maintenanceAndUpdateFrequency

continual

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  • A 1:250,000 map showing the main geological bedrock divisions in Northern Ireland. The bedrock shown on GeoIndex map comprises the bedrock geology, which represents the outcrops (at surface) and subcrops (at near-surface, beneath superficial deposits) in Northern Ireland. For each rock unit there is a brief generalised description showing the major rock group, rock type and age under the following headings. LEX_D: The name of the selected area. This can be a group, formation or igneous intrusion e.g. dyke. LEX_RCS: Map code as it appears on the published 1:250,000 map. RCS_D: The name of the dominant types of rock (lithologies) in the different areas shown on the map e.g. granite. The names of the rock types given here are often generalisations, appropriate for the large areas of geological coverage at this scale. These areas may include a number of different geological formations whose distribution can only be portrayed on more detailed geological maps. RANK: Identifies formations and groups. Min_Time_D and Max_Tim_D: The age of the rock unit in terms of periods, relatively smaller units of geological time e.g. Carboniferous, Jurassic etc. Some of the map areas include rocks with a range of ages and these are shown as such e.g. Triassic to Cretaceous. The oldest metamorphic rocks are described as Moinian and Dalradian. The rocks range in age from those deposited relatively recently, some 2 million years ago, back to ancient and highly altered Precambrian rocks over 2500 million years old. In broad terms the youngest rocks are found in the south and east of the UK, the oldest in the north and west. VERSION: Version of the data. RELEASED: Date of release/update of the data. CAUTION Because of the generalisation and simplification used in the compilation of this map, it should not be used to determine the detailed geology of any specific sites. It is best used to provide a basic understanding of the geology of the country in general, and for showing the geology of large regions where broad trends are more important than specific details. Persons interested in the detailed geology of particular sites should consult the latest large-scale maps or the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland at:- Geological Survey of Northern Ireland Colby House Stranmillis Court Belfast BT9 5BF

  • Data were collected by the Chilbolton Facility for Atmospheric and Radio Research (CFARR) Meteorological Particle Sensor from 2009 to present. During this time the particle sensor was at Chilbolton, Hampshire, whilst previously it had been positioned at Sparsholt College, Hampshire. The dataset contains measurements of the size of individual particulates including rain, snow, and hail, as well as estimates of drizzle, total rainfall and liquid water content.

  • 1 km resolution rain rate data from Met Office's Cobbacombe Cross C-band rain radar, Devon, England as part of the NIMROD, very short range forecasting system used by the Met Office. 1 km rain rate data are available from 2011 until present. Radar images from the C-band (5.3 cm wavelength) radar are received by the Nimrod system 5 minute intervals respectively.

  • Data were collected by the Chilbolton Facility for Atmospheric and Radio Research (CFARR) Disdrometer from the 1st of April 2003 to the present at Chilbolton, Hampshire. The dataset contains measurements of the drop size distribution of rain.

  • The ozone satellite data describe ozone measurements deduced from satellite data. The dataset contains atmospheric profiles of ozone concentrations. The data are measured by satellites and around 2700 observations are made per day.

  • 1 km resolution composite data from the Met Office's UK rainfall radars via the Met Office NIMROD system. The NIMROD system is a very short range forecasting system used by the Met Office. Data are available from 2004 until present at UK stations and detail rain-rate observations taken every 5 minutes. Each file has been compressed and then stored within daily tar archive files. The precipitation rate analysis uses processed radar and satellite data, together with surface reports and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) fields. The UK has a network of 15 C-band rainfall radars and data form these are processed by the Met Office NIMROD system. Please note CEDA are not able to fulfil requests for missing data from this archive. The data may be available at a cost by contacting the Met Office directly with required dates. It is worth contacting the CEDA first to check if the reason for the gap is already identified as being due to the data not existing at all. CEDA does not support reading software but programs written by the community to do this task in IDL, Matlab, FORTRAN and Python are available in the dataset software directory. The data files contain integer precipitation rates in unit of (mm/hr)*32. Each value is between 0 and 32767. In practice it is rare to see a value in excess of 4096 i.e. 128 mm/hr. At 10:00 on 14 June 2005, the 1 km composite data files became larger with 2175 rows by 1725 columns compared to the previous 775 rows by 640 columns. From 14:55 on 30 August 2006, the 1 km composite data files are gzipped files. From 13 Nov 2007, the 1 km composite is derived directly from processed polar (600m x 1 degree) rain rate estimates and there is more detail in the rain structure.

  • Data were collected by Chilbolton Facility for Atmospheric and Radio Research (CFARR) Raingauges from 1st of May 1995 to the present at Chilbolton, Hampshire. The dataset contains measurements of rainfall accumulation as measured by RAL Rapid Response Drop Counting rain gauges.

  • Data were collected from the 14th of February 2009 to the present by the Leosphere EZ polarization lidar at Chilbolton Observatory, Hampshire. The dataset contains plots of the attenuated backscatter coefficient at different heights, and of the depolarization ratio of particles. The dataset contains: Plots of the attenuated backscatter coefficient at different heights, and of the depolarization ratio of particles. Atmospheric backscatter light intensity (raw data) Solid angle and background calibrated data Vertical backscatter and extinction profile Vertical Aerosol profile Planetary Boundary Layer and residual layer heights Semi-transparent cloud height and top Optical depth integrated over whole Lidar range Dynamic structure of the atmosphere (e.g gravity waves...) Asphericity information on the particle in order to discriminate some particles from others (soil dust from other aerosol, ice/water phase of the clouds…)

  • The Campbell Scientific PWS100 present weather sensor deployed at the Chilbolton Observatory, Hampshire, detects and classifies precipitation by observing the scattering of a laser beam 20 degrees off the forward direction in the horizontal and vertical planes. The detected signals depend on the size, shape, optical properties, concentration and velocity of the particles. The instrument is mounted approximately 10m above ground on the roof of a cabin at the Chilbolton Observatory site. It is operated continuously. Data include: counts as a function of size of hydrometeors in 300 bins from 0.1 to 30.0 mm, the number of hydrometeors in 9 type categories. visibility, air temperature, relative humidity, rainfall rate, rainfall accumulation, average hydrometeor velocity, average hydrometeor size and reports the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) present weather code for the site. Data are archived as netCDF files.

  • 5 km resolution rain rate data from Met Office's Cobbacombe Cross C-band rain radar, Devon, England as part of the NIMROD, very short range forecasting system used by the Met Office. 5 km rain rate data are available from April 2004 until present. Radar images from the C-band (5.3 cm wavelength) radar are received by the Nimrod system 5 minute intervals respectively.