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  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project, Oxyfuel and EGR Processes in GT Combustion, was presented at the Sheffield Biannual, 08.04.13. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-26.

  • The NERC-funded QICS controlled CO2 release experiment (located offshore Oban, Scotland) mimics the formation of a new CO2 seep in the marine environment. At the site, CO2 is injected at an onshore well head, and a stainless steel pipe transports the CO2 under the seabed. Approximately 350 m offshore, the CO2 is released through a perforated screen into the 12 metres of overlying marine sediment, which is at approximately 10 metres water depth. During spring/summer 2012, 4.2 tonnes of CO2 was released at the QICS experimental site. CO2 bubbles emerged from the seafloor ~30m to the west of the site and individual plumes covered a total area of ~ 350m2. Bubble stream location was recording using audio (acoustic) and visual techniques (photography, video). Both techniques are useful for recording the general location of plumes. However their 2D nature made it hard to characterise individual plumes and their exact locations. The QICS1 experiment included 200 deployments/recoveries of instruments, collection of 1,300 samples, and installation of 1600 m of cable and placement of 24 cages of indicator species on the seabed. In order to aid planning and operation during potential further experiments at the site it would be beneficial to utilise a robust and accurate method of recording the locations of equipment, samples and CO2 bubble streams. In this review, the four main types of submarine geolocation technologies are detailed and compared, and best available models (as of June 2013) are detailed. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-31.

  • This review details the laboratory experiments that have investigated leakage of geologically stored CO2 (as of June 2013). These experiments have covered a range of leakage factors. Knowledge of these factors can both compliment and help inform any future experiments at the QICS site. As such, the report details what experiments have been performed in the lab to date, how lab experiments can inform QICS and how QICS could inform laboratory experiments. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-31.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Process-performance indexed design of task-specific ionic liquids for post-combustion CO2 capture, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-199.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project, UK Bio-CCS CAP, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 22.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-38.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project Shelter and Escape in the Event of a Release of CO2 from CCS Infrastructure (S-CAPE) was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-179. Pipelines are acknowledged as one of the most efficient and cost-effective methods for transporting large volumes of various fluids over long distances and therefore the majority of proposed schemes for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) involve high pressure pipelines transporting CO2. In order to manage the risk in the event of the failure of a carbon dioxide (CO2) pipeline, it is a core requirement that a separation distance between pipelines and habitable dwellings is defined to ensure a consistent level of risk. The aim of this project is to develop validated and computationally efficient shelter and escape models describing the consequences to the surrounding population of a CO2 release from CCS transportation infrastructure. The models will allow pipeline operators, regulators and standard setters to make informed and appropriate decisions regarding pipeline safety and emergency response. This poster presents some preliminary findings from the S-Cape project and: • Describes the development of analytical and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models to calculate the change in internal CO2 concentration within a building engulfed by a dispersing cloud of CO2. • Investigates the sensitivity of the CO2 concentration within a building to wind speed and the temperature of the CO2 in the pipeline. • Demonstrates how CFD models can be used to verify results obtained using computationally efficient analytical models.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project Quantifying Residual and Dissolution Trapping in the CO2CRC Otway Injection Site was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-204. For a wide adoption of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology, it is essential to provide a commercial operator with a reassurance of the predictability of their proposed site for CO2 storage through geochemical monitoring techniques. This is particular important for assessing residual and solubility trapping, which are more secure than structural trapping of free-phase CO2. It is difficult to quantify how much CO2 is stored by residual and solubility trapping across an entire storage site. Hence, there is a need to develop a test which can be performed at a single injection well during assessment of a potential site for CO2 injection. CO2CRC, one of the world-leading CCS research organisations, conducted the Otway Stage 2B Extension residual saturation test in December 2014 to determine residual trapping at their Otway test site in Victoria, Australia, using a single-well field setting. In direct collaboration with CO2CRC and other global research institutions (CSIRO Energy, University of Melbourne, Simon Fraser University, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), we use water and gas geochemistry to establish the fate of CO2 injected into the Paaratte Formation at the Otway test site. More specifically, we study the application of oxygen isotopes and noble gases to reconstruct levels of residual trapping of CO2.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Experimental investigation with PACT facility and CFD modelling of oxy-coal combustion with recycling real flue gas was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-27. Oxy-coal combustion technology has gained confidence and maturity especially within the last decade (Santos S. 2012) compared to the much earlier studies (Kimura et al., 1995; Wang et al., 1988). However, there are still a number of research challenges associated with flue gas recycling, gas clean-up and plant scale tools and models. Flue gas recycling affects the purity of CO2, oxygen mixing, and ignition of coal particles and flame stability. There is lack of experimental data with real flue gas recycling or treated vent gas recycling, which is one of the available options to achieve the target of zero emissions (Hack et al., 2011), at pilot-scale for the validation of CFD models. The project focuses on the following tasks: • Experimental investigation of oxy-coal combustion, ignition and flame stability with the 250kWth PACT Oxy-Coal Combustion furnace with real and simulated flue gas recycling • Experimental investigation of oxy-coal combustion ignition and flame stability with a laboratory visual drop tube furnace • CFD simulation of the 250kWth PACT Oxy-coal combustion furnace.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project CO2 storage in Palaeogene and Neogene hydrogeological systems of the North Sea: preparation of an IODP scientific drilling bid was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-30. The North Sea Basin (NSB) is considered to be suitable for commercial-scale CO2 storage, due to its favourable geological setting, its proximity to sources, and pioneering operational experience storing CO2 at the Sleipner injection site. The shallow Neogene and Quaternary sediments of the NSB form the overburden and seal to these underlying CO2 reservoirs but are under-researched, even though the NSB is a mature petroleum system, penetrated by many thousands of wells. Quaternary sediments, up to 1000 metres thick, are in general bypassed to reach the deeper, profitable hydrocarbon resources. UKCCSRC and CLIMIT programme funded scientific, governmental and industrial partners from the UK and Norway to collaborate with the purpose of submitting a proposal to the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) for scientific drilling to investigate the overburden to CO2 storage strata.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project Performance of Flow Meters with Dense Phase CO2 and CCS Recovery Streams was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-201. Captured carbon dioxide (CO2) from CCS operations needs to be transported to the storage location. Metering of the flow could be challenging due to the presence of impurities as well as unusual physical properties of the CO2 with impurities. The metering accuracy must be within the range of ±1.5% by mass according to the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) regulations. However, no investigations have been performed to evaluate the performance of flowmeters with pressurized CO2 at operational CCS conditions. The goal of project is to investigate the performance of Coriolis mass flowmeter with high CO2 content mixtures. Specific objectives of the project include: • To study the effect of impurities on the accuracy of the Coriolis flow meter. • To investigate the performance of Coriolis flow meter at conditions likely to happen in the CCS operations. • Evaluation of costs for the deployment of Coriolis flow meter in CCS operations.