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  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project, Mixed Matrix Membrane Preparation for PCC, was presented at the Nottingham Biannual, 04.09.13. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-36.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project Quantifying Residual and Dissolution Trapping in the CO2CRC Otway Injection Site was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-204. For a wide adoption of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology, it is essential to provide a commercial operator with a reassurance of the predictability of their proposed site for CO2 storage through geochemical monitoring techniques. This is particular important for assessing residual and solubility trapping, which are more secure than structural trapping of free-phase CO2. It is difficult to quantify how much CO2 is stored by residual and solubility trapping across an entire storage site. Hence, there is a need to develop a test which can be performed at a single injection well during assessment of a potential site for CO2 injection. CO2CRC, one of the world-leading CCS research organisations, conducted the Otway Stage 2B Extension residual saturation test in December 2014 to determine residual trapping at their Otway test site in Victoria, Australia, using a single-well field setting. In direct collaboration with CO2CRC and other global research institutions (CSIRO Energy, University of Melbourne, Simon Fraser University, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), we use water and gas geochemistry to establish the fate of CO2 injected into the Paaratte Formation at the Otway test site. More specifically, we study the application of oxygen isotopes and noble gases to reconstruct levels of residual trapping of CO2.

  • UKCCSRC Call 2 Project C2-189. The data, which was produced as a result of a UK CCSRC Call 2 funded project, consists of the GC-MS characterisation results for the products collected from the rejuvenation tests of degraded amine sorbents from carbon capture and related model degradation compounds. The examined amine-based sorbent samples included one heavily degraded industrial MEA solvent, one degraded solid-supported polyethyleneimine sample and 6 model MEA degradation compounds (N-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediamine, glycylglycine, 2-Oxazolidinone, 1-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-2-imidazolidinone, 1-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-imidazole, N-Acetylethanolamine. Novel reductive approaches, which were investigated as a potential means for rejuvenating the degraded amine sorbents and where the samples for characterisation were produced, included catalytic hydrogenation, hydrous pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis with platinum, nickel and molybdenum as the catalysts used. The dataset also contains some preliminary CO2 absorption test results for a degraded MEA solvent before and after rejuvenation with hydrous pyrolysis using a continuous reactor. Full technical details of the research are contained in the final report submitted to UK CCSRC.

  • Final report for UKCCSRC Call 2 project, UK demonstration of Enhanced Calcium looping, and first Global Demonstration of Advanced Doping Techniques. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-209.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Quantifying Residual and Dissolution Trapping in the CO2CRC Otway Injection Site, was presented at the Cranfield Biannual, 21.04.15. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-204.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project, Chemical Looping for low-cost Oxygen Production, was presented at the Sheffield Biannual, 08.04.13. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-39.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Oxyfuel and exhaust gas recirculation processes in gas turbine combustion for improved carbon capture performance was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-26. This research is concerned with oxyfuel combustion in gas turbine applications, in particular concentrating on the use of modern swirl-stabilised burners. Oxyfuel is considered a particularly challenging idea, since the resultant burning velocity and flame temperatures will be significantly higher than what might be deemed as a practical or workable technology. For this reason it is widely accepted that EGR-derived CO2 will be used as a diluent and moderator for the reaction (in essence replacing the role of atmospheric nitrogen). The key challenges in developing oxyfuel gas turbine technology are therefore: • Flame stability at high temperatures and burning rates. • The use of CO2 as a combustion diluent. • Potential for CO emission into the capture plant. • Wide or variable operating envelopes across diluent concentrations. • Differences in the properties of N2 and CO2 giving rise to previously unmeasured flame heat release locations.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 1 project Experimental investigation with PACT facility and CFD modelling of oxy-coal combustion with recycling real flue gas was presented at the CSLF Call project poster reception, London, 27.06.16. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-27. Oxy-coal combustion technology has gained confidence and maturity especially within the last decade (Santos S. 2012) compared to the much earlier studies (Kimura et al., 1995; Wang et al., 1988). However, there are still a number of research challenges associated with flue gas recycling, gas clean-up and plant scale tools and models. Flue gas recycling affects the purity of CO2, oxygen mixing, and ignition of coal particles and flame stability. There is lack of experimental data with real flue gas recycling or treated vent gas recycling, which is one of the available options to achieve the target of zero emissions (Hack et al., 2011), at pilot-scale for the validation of CFD models. The project focuses on the following tasks: • Experimental investigation of oxy-coal combustion, ignition and flame stability with the 250kWth PACT Oxy-Coal Combustion furnace with real and simulated flue gas recycling • Experimental investigation of oxy-coal combustion ignition and flame stability with a laboratory visual drop tube furnace • CFD simulation of the 250kWth PACT Oxy-coal combustion furnace.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project Shelter and Escape in the Event of a Release of CO2 from CCS Infrastructure (S-CAPE) was presented at the UKCCSRC Manchester Biannual Meeting, 13.04.2016. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-179.

  • This poster on the UKCCSRC Call 2 project, Process-performance indexed design of task-specific ionic liquids for post-combustion CO2 capture, was presented at the Cardiff Biannual, 10.09.14. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-199.