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2012

647 record(s)
 
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  • The spectacular botanical preservation and long occupation of Qasr Ibrim, Egypt make this site archaeobotanically matchless. 600 samples have been collected over 20 years covering a timespan of c. 1000 BC - AD 1800. The project has particularly focussed on the period AD 100-400 during which several new summer crops including sorghum, cotton, lablab and sesame first appear. These new crops are thought to be associated with the introduction of new irrigation technology, specifically a device known as the saqia, an ox-driven water wheel from which descends a conveyor belt to which pots are attached. It has never before been possible to examine this crucial change archaeologically and this project has allowed the investigation of when and how this great change happened. This has major implications for the history of agriculture in Africa and the Indian Ocean.

  • [THIS APPLICATION HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. MultiMOVE is an R package that contains fitted niche models for almost 1500 plant species in Great Britain. This package allows the user to access these models, which have been fitted using multiple statistical techniques, to make predictions of species occurrence from specified environmental data. It also allows plotting of relationships between species' occurrence and individual covariates so the user can see what effect each environmental variable has on the specific species in question. The package is built under R 2.10.1 and depends on R packages 'leaps', 'earth', 'fields' and 'mgcv'. Full details about this application can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c4d0393e-ff0a-47da-84e0-09ca9182e6cb

  • The data consists of annual measurements of standing aboveground plant biomass, annual aboveground net primary productivity and annual soil respiration between 1998 and 2012. Data were collected from seven European shrublands that were subject to the climate manipulations drought and warming. Sites were located in the United Kingdom (UK), the Netherlands (NL), Denmark ( two sites, DK-B and DK-M), Hungary (HU), Spain (SP) and Italy (IT). All field sites consisted of untreated control plots, plots where the plant canopy air is artificially warmed during night time hours, and plots where rainfall is excluded from the plots at least during the plants growing season. Standing aboveground plant biomass (grams biomass per square metre) was measured in two undisturbed areas within the plots using the pin-point method (UK, DK-M, DK-B), or along a transect (IT, SP, HU, NL). Aboveground net primary productivity was calculated from measurements of standing aboveground plant biomass estimates and litterfall measurements. Soil respiration was measured in pre-installed opaque soil collars bi-weekly, monthly, or in measurement campaigns (SP only). The datasets provided are the basis for the data analysis presented in Reinsch et al. (2017) Shrubland primary production and soil respiration diverge along European climate gradient. Scientific Reports 7:43952. DOI: 10.1038/srep43952 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b902e25a-ffec-446f-a270-03cc2501fe1d

  • Estimates of annual loads of phosphorus, sediment, nitrogen and faecal coliform from non-agricultural sources to rivers in Scotland, reported at Water Framework Directive (WFD) catchment scale. The sources of pollutants include: urban, woodland, montane areas, river bank erosion, septic tanks and sewage treatment works. Loads are estimated based upon available data (e.g. septic tank licences) and modelling (bank erosion). The values specify phosphorous, nitrogen or sediment losses in kilograms per year and faecal coliform in 10^6 colony forming units (cfu) per year. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/eb73ca31-7eb9-479c-96be-6063e29c8a7f

  • Modelled predictions of annual pollutant loads in rivers from agricultural source areas for Scotland, reported at Water Framework Directive (WFD) catchment scale. The modelled pollutants include total phosphorous, nitrate (NO3-N), faecal indicator organisms (FIOs), suspended solids, methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) gas emissions. The agricultural source areas include arable land, improved grassland, rough grazing land and others (e.g. steadings, tracks and other non-field losses). Modelled predictions account for current (c. 2012) implementation of General Binding Rules, Nitrate Vulnerable Zone Action Programme and a number of SRDP options. The values specify pollutant losses in 10^6 colony forming units (cfu) per year for FIOs and kilograms per year for the other pollutants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d4d5a10e-1612-4bb5-97b2-2b850cccdcb2

  • The data consist of woody biomass maps of three study areas - Mabalane, Gurue, and Maruppa in Mozambique. Each area map comprises three Geotiff layers stacked in the order band 1= 2007, band 2 = 2010, band 3 = 2014. Each pixel is an aboveground woody biomass in tonnes of carbon per hectare (ha). For the biomass maps -18.00000 means no data. Due to noise, it is possible to have negative biomass estimates. Individual layers can extracted for year specific analyses. Data were collected as part of the Abrupt Changes in Ecosystem Services and Wellbeing in Mozambican Woodlands (ACES) project under the ESPA programme Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6a8b07f9-552e-408c-8351-595ee6a7fc5f

  • Future Flows Hydrology (FF-HydMod-PPE) is an 11-member ensemble projections of river flow and groundwater levels time series for 283 catchments and 24 boreholes in Great Britain. It is derived from Future Flows Climate, an 11-member 1-km bias-corrected and downscaled climate projection products based on the SRES A1B emission scenario. River Flows data are at a daily time step: Groundwater Levels data are at a monthly time step. Future Flows Hydrology span from 1951 to 2098. The development of Future Flows Hydrology was made during the partnership project 'Future Flows and Groundwater Levels' funded by the Environment Agency for England and Wales, Defra, UK Water Research Industry, NERC (Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and British Geological Survey) and Wallingford HydroSolutions. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f3723162-4fed-4d9d-92c6-dd17412fa37b

  • This dataset includes individual passive detector measurements of radon Rn-222 in the air of artificial burrows, Rn-222 measurements by instrumentation in soil gas of interstitial soil pores and burrow air, gamma analyses results for soil samples and, soil moisture and temperature data. Estimates of absorbed dose rates to wildlife from exposure to natural background radionuclides are required to put estimates of dose rates arising from regulated releases of radioactivity and proposed benchmarks into context. These data are from a study conducted at seven sites in northwest England (comprising broadleaved and coniferous woodlands, scrubland and pastures). Passive track etch detectors were used to measure the Rn-222 concentrations in artificial burrows over a period of approximately one year (July 2009 to June 2010). Instrumented measurements of burrow air and soil pore gas were also conducted in October 2009. The data result from a study funded by NERC-CEH and the England & Wales Environment Agency. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2641515F-5B76-445C-A936-1DA51BF365AD

  • The dataset details global positioning system (GPS) locations recorded for instruments and locations of interest associated with equipment installed for the monitoring of wave energy, surface elevation changes and sedimentation at five UK saltmarsh sites. Two of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England, each of these sites consisted of a salt marsh area and adjacent mudflat area. Rod Sedimentation-Erosion Tables (rSETs) were installed at different distances from the vegetated margin. Three rSETs were deployed for each Essex site and four for the Morecambe sites. rSET benchmarks were installed with associated marker horizons to evaluate surface elevation changes and surface accretion respectively. Shore-normal transects of pressure transducers (PTs) were installed to monitor wave energy transformation across the marsh and mudflat surfaces. The locations and elevations of the equipment is necessary to make use of the associated datasets "Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) wave monitoring over saltmarsh and mudflat habitats" and "Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) sedimentation and erosion monitoring over saltmarsh and mudflat habitats". This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/adf702a1-d154-45b5-9c31-4f6acf5836f1

  • The data consist of species level descriptions of macroinvertebrate communities from two abstracted streams in the Lowther catchment, UK, upstream and downstream of abstraction points. Supporting habitat and geographical data are included. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/df65085c-d376-413e-9fbc-984f7b332878