Creation year

2008

220 record(s)
 
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From 1 - 10 / 220
  • This project aimed to investigate whether the present chronological data for late Mousterian sites in Europe are biasing our perception of Neanderthal populations by making them appear more cold-adapted than the incoming anatomically modern Early Upper Palaeolithic humans. In this study we focused on the part of the Neanderthal world that experienced the most continental climatic environments - namely, European Russia north of the Black Sea - for it is in such a region that the environmental preferences, in particular tolerance to temperature, are most discernible. By applying a series of cross-validated non-14C chronological methodologies (OSL, TL, palaeomagnetic intensity, and tephrostratigraphy) to late Middle Palaeolithic assemblages the project sought to identify spatial and temporal patterning which, when correlated with local environmental proxies and wider climate data, would provide a better understanding of Neanderthal climate tolerances. The project has produced a suite of new age determinations from a selection of archaeological sites that had previously undergone investigation and which were available to sample without requiring new excavations; the corresponding data on the cultural, lithic and environmental associations of the new age measurements derive mostly from earlier existing studies.

  • This dataset contains fossil and modern pollen data collated during a workshop held in the UK in 2008 as part of the NERC (Quantifying and Understanding the Earth System) QUEST programme. The 96 sampling sites are located from 24°E (western Ukraine and Belarus) to easternmost Siberia, and lie north of latitude 40°N. The sample ages range from 21ka to present and are assigned to 1,000 year time slices. The dataset has been checked for consistent taxonomy and a redundancy-free taxonomy has been produced. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6aeba247-52d1-4e84-949f-603742af40c1

  • This dataset consists of soil physico-chemical properties (pH, loss on ignition, bulk density, moisture content, carbon stock and concentration, total nitrogen, Olsen phosphorus) from soils sampled from up to 591 1km squares across Great Britain in 2007. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Please note: the use of Olsen P data, particularly in relation to acidic soils, is controversial. Please ensure these data are suitable for your requirements and exercise caution in their use. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/79669141-cde5-49f0-b24d-f3c6a1a52db8

  • This dataset consists of metal concentrations (aluminium, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, titanium and zinc) measured from soils sampled across Great Britain in 2007. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/826b0829-7ab5-4e22-822f-ee3a137896a9

  • This dataset comprises characteristics of three-spined stickleback fish including length, weight, sex, condition factor (K-factor), cortisol and glucose concentration, RNA:DNA ratio and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity normalised to liver homogenate protein concentration. These data were collected by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology from three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.) captured in the River Ray (south west England) at sites downstream of an urban waste water treatment works (Rodborne WWTW) prior to (2005-2007), and following (2008), remediation of the WWTW effluent with granular activated carbon (GAC) tertiary treatment. During the same period fish were also sampled from neighbouring reference rivers (R. Ock, Childrey Brook). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3322cccd-95fe-4cc9-baf8-48cddd03433d

  • This dataset consists of measures of topsoil mineralisable nitrogen (Mineral-N) from soils sampled from up to 256 1km squares across Great Britain in 2007. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3bafb72b-9f2a-4cbc-a7b8-46e3731c6759

  • As part of the 2006 Field Campaign of the Network for Calibration and Validation of EO data (NCAVEO), an Intergraph Z/I Imaging Digital Mapping Camera (DMC) was used to collect data in 4 spectral bands in the visible and near infrared, at a nominal ground resolution of 65cm. The Chilbolton site was flown over on the 9th June 2006 by the Ordnance Survey, resulting in 84 strips captured over the Area of Interest (2048 x 3072) with 60% overlap along the track. The data was orthorectified to the British National Grid using photogrammetric methods.

  • The Airborne Research & Survey Facility (ARSF, formerly Airborne Remote Sensing Facility) is managed by NERC Scientific Services and Programme Management. It provides the UK environmental science community, and other potential users, with the means to obtain remotely-sensed data in support of research, survey and monitoring programmes. The ARSF is a unique service providing environmental researchers, engineers and surveyors with synoptic analogue and digital imagery of high spatial and spectral resolution.The NEODC holds the entire archive of Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) and Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI) data acquired by the NERC ARSF. High-resolution scanned digital versions of the entire collection of analogue photographs are now also available as well as selected LiDAR-derived elevation and terrain models for selected sites flown using the sensor.

  • As part of the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Land Cover 2007 Pilot Project, a reconnaissance survey was undertaken on 12th May 2006 in a 60 x 60 km area (bounded by Ordnance Survey National Grid Reference X = 400000 to 460000, Y = 095000 to 155000) which included the Network for Calibration and Validation in Earth Observation (NCAVEO) test site. A recording tablet device was used for acquiring ground data for sample points in the defined area. The dataset consists of an ESRI shape file of point data, containing all the points recorded on a tablet device. Each point has a British National Grid X and Y co-ordinate and a class code. The dataset has not been checked or edited yet and a few of the records will be erroneous. The most obvious errors will be two or more points with identical locations but different codes, the final code will be the correct one. Some of the points for Salisbury Plain lie just outside the test area boundaries. A key to abbreviations used for field recording is also included and a list of thematic land cover classes and their codes to aid field reconnaissance, as used for Land Cover Map 2000.

  • "Improving our ability to predict rapid changes in the El Nino Southern Oscillation climatic phenomenon" project, which was a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) RAPID Climate Change Research Programme project (Round 1 - NER/T/S/2002/00443 - Duration 1 Jan 2004 - 30 Sep 2007) led by Prof Alexander Tudhope of the University of Edinburgh, with co-investigators at the Scottish Universities Environment Research Centre, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, and the University of Reading. This dataset collection contains meteorology and ocean model outputs from the GENIE-1 EMIC model. The objective was to use a combination of palaeoclimate reconstruction from annually-banded corals and the fully coupled HadCM3 atmosphere-ocean general circulation model to develop an understanding of the controls on variability in the strength and frequency of ENSO, and to improve our ability to predict the likelihood of future rapid changes in this important element of the climate system. To achieve this, we targeted three periods:0-2.5 ka: Representative of near-modern climate forcing; revealing the internal variability in the system.6-9 ka: a period of weak or absent ENSO, and different orbital forcing; a test of the model's ability to capture externally-forced change in ENSO.200-2100 AD: by using the palaeo periods to test and optimise model parameterisation, produce a new, improved, prediction of ENSO variability in a warming world. Rapid Climate Change (RAPID) was a £20 million, six-year (2001-2007) programme for the Natural Environment Research Council. The programme aimed to improve the ability to quantify the probability and magnitude of future rapid change in climate, with a main (but not exclusive) focus on the role of the Atlantic Ocean's Thermohaline Circulation.