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2008

218 record(s)
 
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  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:25 000 scale. Onshore coverage is partial and BGS has no intention to create a national coverage at this scale. Areas covered are essentially special areas of 'classic' geology and include Llandovery (central Wales), Coniston (Lake District) and Cuillan Hills (Isle of Skye). Data are supplied as five themes: bedrock, superficial deposits, mass movement, artificial ground and linear features. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. The bedrock theme defines landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Superficial deposits are younger geological deposits formed during the most recent geological time; the Quaternary. These deposits rest on older rocks or deposits referred to as bedrock. The superficial deposits theme defines landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with a geological name and their deposit-type or lithological composition. Mass movement describes areas where deposits have moved down slope under gravity to form landslips. These landslips can affect bedrock, superficial or artificial ground. Mass movement deposits are described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme Volume 4. However the data also includes foundered strata, where ground has collapsed due to subsidence (this is not described in the Rock Classification Scheme). Caution should be exercised with this data; whilst mass movement events are recorded in this layer, due to the dynamic nature of occurrence significant changes may have occurred since the data was released, as such it should be viewed as a snapshot in time (data should be regarded as at 2008). Artificial (man-made) theme (shown as polygons) indicates areas where the ground surface has been significantly modified by human activity. Whilst artificial ground may not be considered as part of the 'real geology' of bedrock and superficial deposits it does affect them. Artificial ground impacts on the near surface ground conditions which are important to human activities and economic development. Due to the constantly changing nature of land use and re-use/redevelopment, caution must be exercised when using this data as it represents a snapshot in time rather than an evolving picture hence the data may become dated very rapidly. Linear features (shown as polylines) represent geological structural features e.g. faults, folds or landforms e.g. buried channels, glacial drainage channels at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Linear features are associated most closely with the bedrock theme either as an intrinsic part of it for example marine bands or affecting it in the case of faults. However landform elements are associated with both bedrock and superficial deposits. All five data themes are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence. Another batch of tiles was added to the data in 2012 to bring the total to 167 for this version 2 release.

  • An atmospheric water vapour profile was recorded using a UV Raman LiDAR located at Chilbolton Facility for Atmospheric and Radio Research (CFARR), during the Network for Calibration and Validation of EO data (NCAVEO) 2006 Experiment. The profile was recorded on 16th June 2006, one day before the ‘golden day’. The ground-based Raman LiDAR system at the CFARR transmits a high power Nd:YAG pulse laser beam vertically into the atmosphere at 355 nm wavelength. The LiDAR measures both elastic backscattering and water vapour profiles in the troposphere. Inelastic scattering of the laser radiation by molecules in the atmosphere, termed Raman scattering, is used to determine the atmospheric water vapour and temperature profiles. This dataset contains data for the raw (20s/7.5m) and processed (5min/22.5m) data in separate files. For further information on the parameters used during the data collection and the data's file format please see the dataset's metadata document in linked documentation.

  • The Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) messages data describe hourly observations from around 120 stations distributed globally. The observations, which are later transmitted in reports, give measurements of parameters such as wind speed, and temperature. The data are collected by observation stations worldwide and transmitted within the RASS message. Data are extracted daily at around 00 UT from the Met Office's MetDB system for the previous day's coverage. The dataset contains measurements of the following parameters: - Station height (in m) - Virtual temperature (in Kelvin) - Wind w velocity component (in m/s) - Signal to noise ratio See linked documentation for general information about surface station readings can be obtained from the abridged version of "MIDAS Data Users Guide", provided by the Met Office. This document describes the meteorological surface data in the Met Office Database - MIDAS. This guide is rich in information and is aimed at those with little familiarity with observing methods or instrumentation. Details of the WMO Meteorological codes used at weather observing stations (daily and hourly weather) explain the codes used in this dataset further are also linked to on this record.

  • "To what extent was the Little Ice Age a result of a change in the thermohaline circulation?" project. This was a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) RAPID Climate Change Research Programme project (Joint International Round - NE/C509507/1 - Duration 1 Aug 2005 - 31 Jul 2008) led by Dr Tim Osborn of the University of East Anglia, with co-investigators at the University of East Anglia and Royal Netherlands Meteorology Institute. The dataset contains fresh water hosing model output from the CMIP experiment run by the HadCM3 model. The freshwater was added to the North Atlantic basin between latitudes 50°N and 70°N.

  • "To what extent was the Little Ice Age a result of a change in the thermohaline circulation?" project. This was a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) RAPID Climate Change Research Programme project (Joint International Round - NE/C509507/1 - Duration 1 Aug 2005 - 31 Jul 2008) led by Dr Tim Osborn of the University of East Anglia, with co-investigators at the University of East Anglia and Royal Netherlands Meteorology Institute. The dataset contains negative North Atlantic Oscillation model output from the HadCM3 model.

  • The data were collected by radiosonde at Reading by Convective Storm Initiation Project (CSIP) participants at the University of Reading between the 16th of June 2005 and the 25th of August 2005. Data include measurements of air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and air pressure.

  • Cascade was a NERC funded consortium project to study organized convection and scale interactions in the tropical atmosphere using large domain cloud system resolving model simulations. This dataset contains data from the xeule simulation which ran using the Met Office Unified Model (UM) at 40km horizontal resolution over an idealised equatorial domain of about 8000x4000km. Cascade Idealised simulations are used to study warm pool convection and equatorial waves.

  • Cascade was a NERC funded consortium project to study organized convection and scale interactions in the tropical atmosphere using large domain cloud system resolving model simulations. The xfvbb simulation was made using the Met Office Unified Model (UM) at 12km resolution over the domain 40E-183E, 22S-22N which encompasses the Indian Ocean West Pacific Warm Pool. Cascade Warm Pool simulations coincide with the Year of Tropical Convection. This dataset contains Warm Pool 12km model measurements from xfvbb run.

  • This dataset compromises measurements of the angular distribution of spectral sky radiance (400-1000nm), collected as part of the Network for Calibration and Validation of Earth Observation (NCAVEO) 2006 Field Campaign. Measurements were taken at frequent intervals on the 17th June 2006 using a new instrument designed by Andrew McGonigle. The instrument is based on a temperature-stabilised miniature spectroradiometer interfaced to a telescope that can be programmed to make zenithal scans of sky irradiance. Azimuthal motion of the whole instrument was provided by manual adjustment. A sampling interval of 18° in zenith and 30° in azimuth was used. All data were collected when the spectrometer was thermally stabilised to the same temperature (approximately 7.5°C). Each sample of the sky irradiance distribution comprised two scans: one of the whole sky, and then a second low-gain scan shortly afterwards, concentrating just on the region around the Sun. Scans were repeated twice, with different integration times to allow for the extreme differences in brightness of the Sun and the sky. For further information and details on the structure of the files see the dataset's metadata PDF in linked documentation.