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biota

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  • This dataset consists of plant species presence and abundance in different sizes and types of plots from 508 1km x 1km square sites surveyed across Great Britain in 1990. Many of the plots are repeated from surveys in 1978 and were surveyed again in 1998 and 2007. General information about the plot was recorded including plot number and type as well as species presence and (usually) cover. Data were collected under the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project managed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/26e79792-5ffc-4116-9ac7-72193dd7f191

  • This dataset identified bacteria able to grow in the presence of several Antibiotics in a British agricultural soil, by DNA stable isotope probing (SIP). The dataset was created with samples of the 'heavy' and 'light' fractions of the treatments and also from control soils. The 16S rRNA genes from these samples were amplified and sequenced by barcoded Illumina sequencing. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers 515FB (GTGYCAGCMGCCGCGGTAA) and 806RB (GGACTACNVGGGTWTCTAAT) from the Earth Microbiome project targeting the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene (approximately 250 nucleotides) were used. Library preparation and sequencing was performed at the National Oceanographic Centre (NOC) of the University of Southampton, UK, following methodologies described by Caporaso et al. (2012). Samples were pooled in an equimolar concentration and sequenced on separate runs for MiSeq using a 2 bp x 300 bp paired end protocol.

  • The dataset contains a stratified survey of ecological and soil states at sites where fine scale patterns of covariation between vegetation and edaphic characteristics were recorded. Key data collection included leaf area index, moss and organic matter thickness, surface and deeper soil moisture. Data were collected at sites in the Yukon (2013) and Northwest Territories (2014), Canada. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/36f4e380-d01d-44a7-8321-7a677e6996b2

  • Collated indices are a relative measure of butterfly abundance across monitored sites in the UK, calculated from data collected by the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS). Collated indices are calculated annually for each individual butterfly species that has been recorded on five or more sites in that year. Based on this criterion collated indices have been calculated for the entire UKBMS time series from 1976 to the current year for the majority of species. For some rarer species the time series starts in a later year due to lack of data. Collated indices are calculated using a statistical model that accounts for missing data. The number of sites for each species ranges from 5 to several hundred and varies from year to year. Since 2008 more than 1,000 sites have been monitored across the UK each year. Collated indices are calculated so that we can determine how butterfly populations are changing over time across the UK. This data can be used, for example, to determine where to target conservation efforts and to measure the condition of the UK countryside. Butterflies are recognised as important indicators of biodiversity and environmental change (e.g. as official UK Biodiversity Indicators), and have been used in numerous research studies to understand the impacts of changes in climate and the extent and condition of habitats. The UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme is organized and funded by Butterfly Conservation (BC), the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH), the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). The UKBMS is indebted to all volunteers who contribute data to the scheme. This dataset is updated annually and a more recent version of the UKBMS collated indices is available. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ace3c3ef-df89-40b9-ba8b-106997fd6d9c

  • The data set comprises vegetation species and abundance information, surveyed using a 50 x 50 cm point quadrat, from a selection of the plots within an experimental site at Sourhope, Scotland. The surveys were carried out in the summers of 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002. The data were collected as part of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme, established in 1999 and centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT8545019630). During the experiment, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c730867f-ffd7-4d2d-9dd0-e2f30a7dbbf6

  • This dataset contains Cynipid gall abundance from an oak provenance trial at Petite Charnie in France. 2400 trees were sampled from 20 provenances of Quercus petraea and Quercus robur in 2008 and 2009. Cynipids have two gall generations each year so trees were sampled in spring (sexual generation) and autumn (asexual generation). 10 twigs were surveyed for galls on all parts of the terminal shoot (buds, leaves, stem, catkins) from each tree in spring and autumn. Counts were made for each species and generation. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1c99f7ad-6ae3-4891-801c-e3babdb61887

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. Site indices, as a relative measure of the actual population size, for UK butterfly species calculated from data from the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS). Site indices are a relative rather than an absolute measure of the size of a population, and have been shown to relate closely to other, more intensive, measures of population size such as mark, release, recapture (MRR) methods. The site index can be thought of as a relative measure of the actual population size, being a more or less constant proportion of the number of butterflies present. The proportion seen is likely to vary according to species; some butterfly species are more conspicuous and thus more easily detected, whereas others are much less easy to see. Site indices are only calculated at sites with sufficient monitoring visits throughout the season, or for targeted reduced effort surveys (timed observations, larval web counts and egg counts) where counts are generally obtained as close to the peak of the flight period as possible and are subsequently adjusted for the time of year and size of the site (area of suitable habitat type for a given species). Wider Countryside Butterfly Survey (WCBS) sites are thus excluded because they are based on very few visits from which accurate indices of abundance cannot currently be calculated. For transect sites a statistical model (a General Additive Model, 'GAM') is used to impute missing values and to calculate a site index. Each year most transect sites (over 90%) produce an index for at least one species and in recent years site indices are calculated for almost 1,500 sites across the UK. Site indices are subsequently collated to contribute to the overall 'Collated Index' for each species, which are relative measures of the abundance of each species across a geographical area, for example, across the whole UK or at country level in England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. Individual site indices are important in informing conservation management as not all sites show the same patterns for each species and likely reflect a combination of local climate and habitat management at the site. The UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme is organized and funded by Butterfly Conservation (BC), the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). The UKBMS is indebted to all volunteers who contribute data to the scheme. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/abc32fcc-07e6-48ef-9cf3-d7d65e127bf1

  • Collated indices are a relative measure of butterfly abundance across monitored sites in the UK, calculated from data collected by the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS). Collated indices are calculated annually for each individual butterfly species that has been recorded on five or more sites in that year. Based on this criterion collated indices have been calculated for the entire UKBMS time series from 1976 to the current year for the majority of species. For some rarer species the time series starts in a later year due to lack of data. Collated indices are calculated using a statistical model that accounts for missing data. The number of sites for each species ranges from 5 to several hundred and varies from year to year. Since 2008 more than 1,000 sites have been monitored across the UK each year. Collated indices are calculated so that we can determine how butterfly populations are changing over time across the UK. This data can be used, for example, to determine where to target conservation efforts and to measure the condition of the UK countryside. Butterflies are recognised as important indicators of biodiversity and environmental change (e.g. as official UK Biodiversity Indicators), and have been used in numerous research studies to understand the impacts of changes in climate and the extent and condition of habitats. Although the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) and Butterfly Conservation (BC) are responsible for the calculation and interpretation of the Collated indices, the collection of the data used in their creation is ultimately reliant on a large volunteer community. The UKBMS is funded by a consortium of organisations led by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). This dataset is updated annually and more recent versions of the UKBMS collated indices are available. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/009334d6-ee33-43fc-a259-bf4d92fb69dc

  • Dataset contains distribution of aerial grass pollen data using environmental metabarcoding. The data containing the rbcL and ITS2 markers for aerial grass pollen across different latitudes across Britain. This data is NERC-funded but not held by the EIDC. This data is archived in NCBI (SRA) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sra/SRP150205

  • Field measurements collected from a open top chamber (OTC) warming experiment on Rothera Point, Adelaide Island. Data consist of (i) the percentage frequencies of fungal structures recorded in the tissues of the leafy liverwort Cephaloziella varians sampled from five control plots and five plots warmed with OTCs on six occasions between 16 February 2007 and 21 March 2017, (ii) temperatures of C. varians mat measured every 3 h between 17 February 2010 and 23 February 2011 in four control plots and four OTCs and (iii) moisture concentrations of C. varians mat measured on 11 January, 31 January, 14 February and 28 February 2014 in five control plots and five OTCs.