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  • This dataset provides digital spatial information on the location of mineral resources in Wales at a scale of 1:50 000. The term ‘mineral resources’ has a definition under international standards that includes both an economic and geological dimension. These data are based primarily on mapped geology with limited assessment of economics. Therefore, the term ‘mineral resources’ is used here in a broad sense. The dataset allows users to visualise the extent and distribution of mineral resources and to relate them to other forms of land-use (such as urban areas or designated environmentally sensitive areas) or to other factors (such as transport infrastructure and conservation information). The British Geological Survey (BGS) was awarded a grant from the Welsh Assembly Government Aggregates Levy Fund in 2009 to provide a comprehensive, relevant and accessible information base to enhance the sustainability of mineral resources for Wales. BGS co-funded this project through its Sustainable Mineral Solutions project. This work was completed in 2010. This dataset comprises the digital GIS files which were produced through this project. The major elements of minerals information presented on the maps are; the geological distribution of all onshore mineral resources in Wales, the location of mineral extraction sites, the recorded occurrences of metallic minerals, the recorded location of former slate quarries and significant areas of slate waste and the recorded location of historic building stone quarries. In 2020 minor revisions to geometry and attributes were made in in response to minor corrections that were required. The paper maps were not re-released with these data updates. Point data for mineral occurrence and mine site data has not been included in this revision as these data are superseded by other BGS datasets, such as the BGS BritPits database of mines and quarries. The BGS Mineral Resource data does not determine mineral reserves and therefore does not denote potential areas of extraction. Only onshore, mainland mineral resources are included in the dataset. This dataset has been produced by the collation and interpretation of mineral resource data principally held by the British Geological Survey. The mineral resource data presented are based on the best available information, but are not comprehensive and their quality is variable. The dataset should only be used to show a broad distribution of those mineral resources which may be of current or potential economic interest.

  • BGS have collected environmental radioactivity data for various purposes over several decades. This is being drawn together to produce a database of baseline gamma radioactivity and radon. Data includes the relevant portions of airborne and ground gamma spectrometer surveys, mineral exploration, baseline geochemistry and environmental radiometric surveys along with lithogeochemical and borehole log data. It is predominantly a specialist subset of other existing BGS databases. Incomplete UK coverage.

  • The British Geological Survey (BGS) was awarded a grant from the Welsh Assembly Government Aggregates Levy Fund in 2009 to provide a comprehensive, relevant and accessible information base to enhance the sustainability of mineral resources for Wales. BGS co-funded this project through its Sustainable Mineral Solutions project. This work was completed in 2010. This dataset comprises the digital GIS files which were produced through this project. The major elements of minerals information presented on the maps are; the geological distribution of all onshore mineral resources in Wales, the location of mineral extraction sites, the recorded occurrences of metallic minerals, the recorded location of former slate quarries and significant areas of slate waste and the recorded location of historic building stone quarries. The BGS Mineral Resource data does not determine mineral reserves and therefore does not denote potential areas of extraction. Only onshore, mainland mineral resources are included in the dataset. This dataset has been produced by the collation and interpretation of mineral resource data principally held by the British Geological Survey. The mineral resource data presented are based on the best available information, but are not comprehensive and their quality is variable. The dataset should only be used to show a broad distribution of those mineral resources which may be of current or potential economic interest. The data should not be used to determine individual planning applications or in taking decisions on the acquisition or use of a particular piece of land, although they may give useful background information which sets a specific proposal in context.

  • The G-BASE programme involves systematic sampling and the determination of chemical elements in samples of stream sediment, stream water and soil, to build up a picture of the surface chemistry of the UK. G-BASE for SW England is the most recent area of the UK sampled by this on-going project The average sample density for stream sediments is approximately one site per 2km square. Density for soils in SW England is variable across the area, ranging from 1 per 2km square to one per 5km square, depending on underlying parent material. Analytical precision is high with strict quality control to ensure countrywide consistency. Results have been standardised to ensure continuity with existing G-BASE geochemical data. The data provide baseline information on the natural abundances of elements, against which anomalous values due to such factors as mineralisation and industrial contamination may be compared. Analytical data for the sub150 microns fraction of stream sediment and the sub 2mm fraction of soil samples are available for some or all of: Ag, Al, As, Ba, Bi, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Hf, I, In, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Te, Th, Ti, Tl, U, V, W, Y, Yb, Zn, and Zr.

  • This dataset has now been superseded, please see the Measured Urban Soil Chemistry dataset. The BGS digital point source urban soil chemistry data (GB_PointSourceUrbanSoilPHE_v1) comprises the locations and concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic (As), Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) in urban topsoil samples. The data is derived from the national, high resolution urban soil geochemical data from the BGS Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) project. The information is relevant for the first stage of any assessment of risks to human health required by regulatory authorities in relation to land use and also for assessing ecological risk. Although point source PHE (Potentially Harmful Element) concentrations above respective SGVs (Soil Guideline Value) do not necessarily imply a significant health risk, they do highlight the need to consider whether or not there may be a risk. The urban soil chemistry data can be used to assist Local Planning Authorities to identify those areas where a risk assessment may need to be carried out by developers. Comparison of this spatially referenced geochemical data with information on current or historic land use and geological information might help environmental professionals decide whether high PHE concentrations in topsoils can be attributed to geogenic or anthropogenic sources. The point source data is based on an interpretation of the records in the possession of the BGS at the time the dataset was created.

  • The Estimated Urban Soil Chemistry data are derived by spatial interpolation of the Measured Urban Soil Chemistry data. A unique feature of this dataset is the inclusion for the first time of estimated bioaccessible arsenic and lead data. The Estimated Urban Soil Chemistry data indicates the estimated geometric mean concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic, Cadmium, Chromium, Nickel and Lead in topsoil derived by spatial interpolation of the Measured Urban Soil Chemistry data. Estimated bioaccessible As and Pb concentrations are derived using linear regression models of the relationship between total and bioaccessible concentrations. The Estimated Urban Soil Chemistry data can be used to assist Local Planning Authorities to identify those areas where a risk assessment may need to be carried out by developers. Comparison of this spatially referenced geochemical data with information on current or historic land use and geological information might help environmental professionals decide whether high potentially harmful element (PHE) concentrations in topsoils can be attributed to geogenic or anthropogenic sources. The dataset is based on, and limited to, an interpretation of the records in the possession of the BGS at the time the dataset was created. This dataset consists of two shape files Estimated Urban Soil Chemistry (As, Cr, Ni) and Estimated Urban Soil Chemistry (Cd, Pb).

  • This dataset has now been superseded, please see the Estimated Urban Soil Chemistry dataset. There are two themes to BGS urban soil chemistry, the point source dataset and the estimated dataset. The point source urban soil chemistry data comprises the locations and concentrations (mg kg-1) of Arsenic (As). Cadmium (Cd), Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni) and Lead (Pb) in urban topsoil samples. The Estimated Urban Soil Chemistry data indicates the estimated geometric mean concentrations (mg kg-1) of As, Cd, Cr, Ni and Pb in topsoil derived by spatial interpolation of the Point Source Urban Soil Chemistry data. Both urban soil chemistry datasets are derived from high resolution urban soil geochemical data from the BGS Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment (G-BASE) project. The Urban Soil Chemistry data can be used to assist Local Planning Authorities to identify those areas where a risk assessment may need to be carried out by developers. Comparison of this spatially referenced geochemical data with information on current or historic land use and geological information might help environmental professionals decide whether high PHE concentrations in topsoils can be attributed to geogenic or anthropogenic sources. The dataset is based on, and limited to, an interpretation of the records in the possession of the BGS at the time the dataset was created.

  • This national digital GIS product produced by the British Geological Survey indicates the potential for leakage to have a negative effect on ground stability. It is largely derived from the digital geological map and expert knowledge. The GIS dataset contains seven fields. The first field is a summary map that gives an overview of where leakage may affect ground stability. The other six fields indicate the properties of the ground with respect to the extent to which hazards associated with soluble rocks, landslides, compressible ground, collapsible ground, swelling clays and running sands will be increased due to leakage. The data is useful to asset managers in water companies, local authorities and utility companies who would like to understand where. and to what extent, leaking underground pipes or other structures may initate or worsen ground stability.

  • The data comprises a GIS layer representing the permeability of bedrock for Great Britain The permeability data has been derived from DiGMap-GB (Digital Geological Map Data of Great Britain), and therefore reflects the scale of DiGMap-GB. For the majority of the Great Britain, the scale is 1:50,000, however in areas where the geology is not mapped to this scale, 1:250,000 data are. The data is updated annually, or after a major new release of DiGMap-GB. The permeability data describes the fresh water flow through geological deposits and the ability of a lithostratigraphical unit to transmit water. Maximum and minimum permeability indices are given for each geological unit to indicate the range in permeability likely to be encountered and the predominant flow mechanism (fracture or intergranular). Neither of the assigned values takes into account the thickness of either the unsaturated or saturated part of the lithostratigraphical unit. The data can be used freely internally, but is licensed for commercial use. It is best displayed using a desktop GIS, and is available in vector format as ESRI shapefiles and MapInfo TAB files.

  • This dataset provides digital spatial information on the location of mineral resources in England at a scale of 1:50 000. The term ‘mineral resources’ has a definition under international standards that includes both an economic and geological dimension. These data are based primarily on mapped geology with limited assessment of economics. Therefore, the term ‘mineral resources’ is used here in a broad sense. The dataset allows users to visualise the extent and distribution of mineral resources and to relate them to other forms of land-use (such as urban areas or designated environmentally sensitive areas) or to other factors (such as transport infrastructure and conservation information). The dataset is derived from a set of commissioned projects to prepare a series of mineral resource maps based on counties or amalgamations of counties. Maps for England were commissioned by the central government department with responsibility for mineral planning at the time (Department of the Environment (DoE), Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions (DETR), Department for Transport, Local Government and the Regions (DTLR), Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM), and the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) between 1994 and 2006. Each map produced (with an accompanying report describing the mineral resources depicted on the map) is available to download, as a PDF file from the BGS-hosted website: www.MineralsUK.com. During 2011-2012 revisions were made to areas of the resource linework. These changes were made as a result of new research and release of a new version of DiGMap (v5). This work was on an ad hoc basis but affects all resource layers. In 2020 minor revisions to geometry and attributes were made in in response to minor corrections that were required. The paper maps were not re-released with these data updates. The BGS Mineral Resource data does not determine mineral reserves and therefore does not denote potential areas of extraction. Only onshore, mainland mineral resources are included in the dataset. This dataset has been produced by the collation and interpretation of mineral resource data principally held by the British Geological Survey. The mineral resource data presented are based on the best available information, but are not comprehensive and their quality is variable. The dataset should only be used to show a broad distribution of those mineral resources which may be of current or potential economic interest.