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2018

522 record(s)
 
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  • Scope This database compiles, from published sources, the sample records of archaeobotanical (plant) remains from archaeological sites located in southwest Asia, central Anatolia and Cyprus dated to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic or earlier. Research The database contributes directly to the following publication, and users are referred to that article for further information on the development and intended use of the database: Wallace, M., Jones, G., Charles, M., Forster, E., Stillman, E., Bonhomme, V., Livarda, A., Osborne, C., Rees, M., Frenck, G., Preece, C. (submitted). Re-analysis of archaeobotanical remains from pre- and early agricultural sites provides no evidence for a narrowing of the wild plant food spectrum during the origins of agriculture in southwest Asia. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany. Funding This database was developed during two projects based at the University of Sheffield, funded by a European Research Council (ERC) grant 'The Evolutionary Origins of Agriculture' (grant no. 269830-EOA, PI Glynis Jones, University of Sheffield) and a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) grant 'Origins of Agriculture: an Ecological Perspective on Crop Domestication' (grant no. NE/H022716/1, PI Colin Osborne, University of Sheffield). The database builds on an earlier database compiled by Sue Colledge during 'The Origin and Spread of Neolithic Plant Economies in the Near East and Europe' project (AHRB, PIs Stephen Shennan and James Conolly, University College London) and the 'Domestication of Europe' project (NERC, PI Terry Brown, University of Manchester). Citation When using data included in this database the original publication(s) of the data should be cited. Original publications can be identified in the tables '4_Records (samples)' and '5_References'. The authors would be grateful if this database is cited in addition to the original publication(s). Disclaimer This database is a compilation of data as presented by other researchers. Inclusion in this database does not constitute an endorsement of the data or the researchers. The authors of the database do not take responsibility for any adverse outcome due to transcription or other errors introduced in the creation of this database. When using the database the original source of data should be checked to ensure the accuracy and integrity of the data included in the database

  • Star Carr is arguably the most well known Mesolithic site in Europe. The potential of this area was first discovered by the work of local amateur archaeologist John Moore in the late 1940s, who realised that the flat expanse of peat within the eastern end of the Vale of Pickering had once been an ancient lake, which he called Lake Flixton. Since the Mesolithic period, the lake had infilled with peat and this had created excellent preservation conditions for the archaeology in this area.

  • Data comprise monitoring records of a population of Gryllus campestris, a flightless, univoltine field cricket that lives in and around burrows excavated among the grass in a meadow in Asturias (North Spain). The area has an altitude range from around 60 to 270 metres above sea level. The data present information on various mating-related activities of male crickets, including age, singing activity, dominance in fights, and lifespan. Data were collected from 2006 to 2016. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/57c7f153-0f5c-40ef-bf73-e800cb8d4013

  • Marine fish, algae and invertebrate invasive alien species (IAS) data from Akrotiri and Dhekelia, Cyprus. Data were collected during an 19-month monitoring period starting in February 2017 and ending in September 2018. Sampling occurred seasonally, approximately once every 3 months, and used an underwater visual census (UVC) method. The UVC involved divers swimming at a steady pace along three 25m transects, with each transect separated by a 5m gap. The transects were randomly placed, covering a variety of habitats such as seagrass beds and rocky habitats where possible. Fish species were recorded and abundance estimated within 2.5m on each side of the transect. Benthic species (algae and invertebrates) were recorded from quadrats placed every 1m along each 25m transect. Sampling carried out by the University of Cyprus and volunteer divers from the Western Sovereign Base Area Sub Aqua Club as part of a Defra Darwin Initiative Plus project to ascertain baseline data on native and non-native marine species in the Sovereign Base Area of Akrotiri. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/519d42bf-51cc-42a4-8673-5f2044cfa19a

  • This web map service shows bee nectar plant richness across Great Britain . The source data uses counts of bee nectar plants in Countryside Survey area vegetation plots in 2007 and extrapolates to 1km squares across GB using a generalised additive mixed model. Co-variables used in the model are Broad Habitat (the dominant broad habitat of the 1km square), air temperature, nitrogen deposition, precipitation and altitude. The map has the following layers: plantCount = a modelled estimate of the count of all bee nectar plants within a 1km by 1km square, SEM = a measure of the variance of the plantCount attribute Understanding the distribution of bee nectar plants does provide valuable information on the potential distribution of pollinators and hence pollination.

  • NB The data are stored in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) with accession numbers as follows: ENA accession number: ERP016063 - Name "Daisy Lake Shotgun" - Study PRJEB14421 ena-STUDY-UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE-15-06-2016-17:31:41:520-20 and can be accessed at https://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/PRJEB14421 ENA accession number: ERP019980 - Name "Sudbury Lake mesocosms shotgun" - Study PRJEB18063 ena-STUDY-UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE-23-11-2016-12:04:04:617-1945 and can be accessed at https://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/PRJEB18063 ENA accession number: ERP110084 - Name "Lake sediment mesocosm microbial communities" STUDY PRJEB27946 ena-STUDY-UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE-26-07-2018-16:21:00:749-1221 and can be accessed at https://www.ebi.ac.uk/ena/data/view/PRJEB27946

  • This dataset contains results from in situ field measurements of riverbed nitrogen transformations in the Hammer Stream, a sandy tributary of the River Rother in West Sussex, UK. Measurements were performed in November 2014 and February, April and July 2015. The data include baseline concentrations of nutrients (NO2, NO3, NH3, PO4), chloride, oxygen, pH, temperature, Fe(II), organic carbon, 15N-N2 and methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) sampled from porewater prior to injection of 15N-nitrate. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7ded510f-3955-4b92-851d-29c0f79a0b99

  • The data records bird species and number in different green spaces within Sheffield City Region during June and July 2018. Activity of individual birds is also noted. Ten green spaces (parks) were surveyed on three occasions, with a researcher walking along six pre-designated line transects in each location. Birds were recorded by their common names and British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) code. Date and time were recorded for each observation. The data was collected as part of the NERC IWUN Project (Improving well-being through urban nature). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/aff674ee-cf95-4378-b002-f41c0a5a6a4e

  • This dataset reports metrics of plant growth, including height, total biomass and the biomass of component plant parts, and percentage root colonisation by mycorrhizas, for tree seedlings of eight tropical and seven subtropical growing in pots of soil that had been amended by addition of various sources of phosphorus (inorganic phosphate, adenosine monophosphate, phytic, or a mixture of all three) plus an unfertilized control treatment with no P additions. The aim of the experiment was to test the hypothesis that seedlings of species that associate with different types of root-inhabiting mycorrhizal fungi would respond differently to the range of P sources applied in the experiment. The experiments were conducted as part of a NERC Discovery Science project with the title Explaining niche separation in tropical forests: feedbacks from root-fungal symbioses and soil phosphorus partitioning led by Professor David Burslem (University of Aberdeen) reference NE/M004848/1. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3ad644c9-e341-4a15-ab35-311076defc33

  • Data are presented showing grass productivity as grammes per 100 square centimetres under four different nutrient treatments (water, nitrogen, phosphorus and nitrogen & phosphorus combined). An experimental hillslope in the Conwy catchment was selected in August 2016. Three transects, were identified across the hillslope. Along each transect, a 1 x 1 square metre quadrat was used to delineate randomly selected sampling areas. Within each quadrat 5 individual 10 x 10 x 10 centimetre (cm) swards were collected using a spade and transported to the laboratory in Bangor University for the nutrient addition. Three different harvests at different stages (initial cut, first harvest, second harvest) were conducted in order to measure grass productivity. Harvest included removal of all vegetation within the quadrat down to approximately 1 cm in height. The data were collected to identify the nutrient limitations within the hillslope by trained members of staff from Bangor University and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The data were collected for the NERC project 'The Multi-Scale Response of Water quality, Biodiversity and Carbon Sequestration to Coupled Macronutrient Cycling from Source to Sea' (NE/J011991/1). The project is also referred to as Turf2Surf. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6e395915-ab5c-43f4-b4de-c9a3c5c1b956