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2018

471 record(s)

 

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Essential Climate Variables

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From 1 - 10 / 471
  • Scope This database compiles, from published sources, the sample records of archaeobotanical (plant) remains from archaeological sites located in southwest Asia, central Anatolia and Cyprus dated to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic or earlier. Research The database contributes directly to the following publication, and users are referred to that article for further information on the development and intended use of the database: Wallace, M., Jones, G., Charles, M., Forster, E., Stillman, E., Bonhomme, V., Livarda, A., Osborne, C., Rees, M., Frenck, G., Preece, C. (submitted). Re-analysis of archaeobotanical remains from pre- and early agricultural sites provides no evidence for a narrowing of the wild plant food spectrum during the origins of agriculture in southwest Asia. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany. Funding This database was developed during two projects based at the University of Sheffield, funded by a European Research Council (ERC) grant 'The Evolutionary Origins of Agriculture' (grant no. 269830-EOA, PI Glynis Jones, University of Sheffield) and a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) grant 'Origins of Agriculture: an Ecological Perspective on Crop Domestication' (grant no. NE/H022716/1, PI Colin Osborne, University of Sheffield). The database builds on an earlier database compiled by Sue Colledge during 'The Origin and Spread of Neolithic Plant Economies in the Near East and Europe' project (AHRB, PIs Stephen Shennan and James Conolly, University College London) and the 'Domestication of Europe' project (NERC, PI Terry Brown, University of Manchester). Citation When using data included in this database the original publication(s) of the data should be cited. Original publications can be identified in the tables '4_Records (samples)' and '5_References'. The authors would be grateful if this database is cited in addition to the original publication(s). Disclaimer This database is a compilation of data as presented by other researchers. Inclusion in this database does not constitute an endorsement of the data or the researchers. The authors of the database do not take responsibility for any adverse outcome due to transcription or other errors introduced in the creation of this database. When using the database the original source of data should be checked to ensure the accuracy and integrity of the data included in the database

  • Star Carr is arguably the most well known Mesolithic site in Europe. The potential of this area was first discovered by the work of local amateur archaeologist John Moore in the late 1940s, who realised that the flat expanse of peat within the eastern end of the Vale of Pickering had once been an ancient lake, which he called Lake Flixton. Since the Mesolithic period, the lake had infilled with peat and this had created excellent preservation conditions for the archaeology in this area.

  • Terrestrial laser scanning data of the slopes above the A83 Rest and Be Thankful collected by a Riegl LMS Z620i instrument in 2016 after Storms Desmond and Frank from 3 positions. These data are scanner centric coordinates which the end-user needs to align and (if required) align into a global coordinate system. Data are in raw format, supplied as .las with scaled intensity included.

  • This web map shows positive plant habitat condition indicators across Great Britain (GB). This data provides a metric of plant diversity weighted by the species that you would expect and desire to have in a particular habitat type so indicates habitat condition. In each Countryside Survey 2007 area vegetation plot the number of positive plant habitat indicators (taken from a list created from Common Standards Monitoring Guidance and consultation with the Botanical society of the British Isles (BSBI)) for the habitat type in which the plot is located are counted. This count is then divided by the possible indicators for that habitat type (and multiplied by 100) to get a percentage value. This is extrapolated to 1km squares across GB using a generalised additive mixed model. Co-variables used in the model are Broad Habitat (the dominant broad habitat of the 1km square), air temperature, nitrogen deposition, sulphur deposition, precipitation and whether the plot is located in a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) (presence or absence data).

  • The dataset consists of: (1) Listing of full site survey package of geophysical data held in the IODP Data Bank in support of proposal 864. Details of how to obtain existing freely available or commercial proprietary data are included. (2) Final version of Full Science Proposal 864, which contains: description and illustrations of the regional stratigraphy of Pernambuco Plateau, as interpreted by the Virtual Site Survey project; site summary sheets for all proposed drill sites based on the Virtual Site Survey. (3) A complete list of all deliverables associated with this project is provided in the Data Archiving Report.

  • Direct geological observations made during field work, tied to positional information collected by hand-held GPS.

  • Glass major element geochemical data on Late Quaternary tephra deposits from the Main Ethiopian Rift volcanoes. These data were acquired using Electron Microprobe Analysis, and secondary standard data (MPI-DING glasses) are also included. All samples were given a unique name related to the outcrop from which they were obtained. Outcrops are named "MER" followed by a 3-digit number (e.g. MER153). Samples from a given outcrops are given the same name, followed by a letter (e.g. MER153A). Outcrop localities, with GPS coordinates (Lat Long WGS84) and brief description of the geology are also included. These data are published as Supplementary Files to a paper published in Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research: Fontijn et al (2018), https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2018.02.001.

  • 120 samples of 57 tephra layers identified at IODP Expedition 350 sites (U1436 and U1437) were used in grain size analysis. Some layers have one grain size measurement, others have multiple measurements throughout the tephra layer.

  • The data comprise of temperatures (degC) from a fibre optic distributed temperature sensor and soil moisture in the form of volumetric water content (VWC), expressed in m3/m3. The measurements were performed in a vegetated hillslope in Staffordshire, UK, in the context of the NERC funded project DiHPS: A Distributed Heat Pulse Sensor Network for subsurface heat and water fluxes. The site was equipped with: 15xVWC point probes (5TM, Decagon Devices) installed at 5 locations along the hillslope. At each location, 3x5TM probes were inserted in the soil at depths of 0.10m, 0.25m, 0.40m from the soil surface 1,512m of fibre optic cable for Active DTS measurements. The fibre was buried in the soil in three overlapped loops of 504m each at 0.10m, 0.25m, 0.40m. The measurements from the 5TM were used to infer a site specific empirical relation to obtain soil moisture from Active-DTS measurements, following the approach from Sayde et al., WRR, 2010 (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/241060722_Feasibility_of_soil_moisture_monitoring_with_heated_fiber_optics)

  • Pulleniatina sample weights U1486. Grant abstract: This grant supports the participation of UK scientists Professor Paul Pearson in Expedition 363 of the International Ocean Discovery Program which plans to study the history of the 'Indo-Pacific Warm Pool' over the last 15 million years. It includes costs to cover his time while on board ship (2 months at sea) and post-expedition scientific study. Sea surface temperatures exceed 28oC across a huge area of the tropical western Pacific and Indian Oceans. Known as the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP), this area is fundamental to the global atmospheric circulation and hydrologic cycle. The IPWP is intensifying with global warming, but modelling its likely future is challenging. Expedition n363 aims to study its temperature and climatic history over the past 15 million years, including through glacial to interglacial climate cycles and back to the globally warm Miocene epoch. Understanding its past history will help determine if its current temperature is near to its likely maximum or if global warming can cause much greater intensification in the future. Professor Pearson is a specialist in the study of microscopic fossils called planktonic foraminifera. He will study the evolution of the ocean plankton in the region over the study period, in relation to climatic change and sea level fluctuations which greatly affect the distribution of land masses and shallow seas and hence ocean current patterns. The foraminifera are also used to determine the age of the sediments drilled (called biostratigraphy) and providing other expedition scientists with a high quality planktonic foraminifer biostratigraphy will be one of the main features of this project. In additional there is a particular focus on an evolutionary lineage of foraminifera called Pulleniatina which has considerable untapped potential for stratigraphic work and also as a case study in the detailed speciation and extinction of a group of plankton. Study of this group will be facilitated by the large populations and varying morphology exhibited by them and because, like snails, they can be left or right handed and the pattern of coiling through time and across space is highly complex and potentially very informative.