cl_maintenanceAndUpdateFrequency

notPlanned

935 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 935
  • The Quaternary deposits thickness dataset is a digital geological map across the bulk of the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS), for areas up to a water depth of 200m, which shows the thickness of the deposits over bedrock in three categories: <5m, 5-50m, and >50m Quaternary cover. These depth bands were picked because they represent the horizons that have impact on offshore infrastructure deployment. The map is derived from (unpublished) BGS 1:1000000 scale Quaternary digital geological mapping. The map was produced in 2014 in collaboration with, and co-funded by, The Crown Estate as part of a wider commissioned project to assess seabed geological constraints on engineering infrastructure across the UKCS. The data are held by the BGS as an ESRI ArcGIS Shapefile.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:25 000 scale. Onshore coverage is partial and BGS has no intention to create a national coverage at this scale. Areas covered are essentially special areas of 'classic' geology and include Llandovery (central Wales), Coniston (Lake District) and Cuillan Hills (Isle of Skye). Superficial deposits are the youngest geological deposits formed during the most recent period of geological time, the Quaternary, which extends back about 2.58 million years from the present. They lie on top of older deposits or rocks referred to as bedrock. Superficial deposits were laid down by various natural processes such as action by ice, water, wind and weathering. As such, the deposits are denoted by their BGS lexicon name, which classifies them on the basis of mode of origin (lithogenesis) with names such as, 'glacial deposits', 'river terrace deposits' or 'blown sand'; or on the basis of their composition such as 'peat'. Most of these superficial deposits are unconsolidated sediments such as gravel, sand, silt and clay. The digital data includes attribution to identify each deposit type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volume 4). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • These files contain ground penetrating radar (GPR) data collected from the glacier margins and forelands of Falljökull and of Kvíárjökull, south-east Iceland, between 2012 and 2014. The data were collected using a Sensors and Software PulseEKKO Pro GPR system. For each glacier the data are stored in folders that indicate the month and year in which the surveys were conducted. Each GPR profile has a Sensors and Software GPR (.DT1) file, and associated header (.HD) and GPS (.GPS) files. The .HD files (which can be opened as text files) give the parameters and equipment used for each profile. GPS files are not available for some of the profiles collected on Falljökull in April 2013 (due to damage that occurred to the GPS linked with the PulseEKKO Pro system). For these profiles start, finish, and mid profile positions were recorded using differential GPS, and locations of these profiles are instead given by GIS shapefiles in the relevant folders. These datasets have been used in the publications listed below. Further information relating to the data collection methodology can be found therein. Phillips, Emrys; Everest, Jez; Evans, David J.A.; Finlayson, Andrew; Ewertowski, Marek; Guild, Ailsa; Jones, Lee. 2017 Concentrated, ‘pulsed’ axial glacier flow: structural glaciological evidence from Kvíárjökull in SE Iceland. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 42 (13). 1901-1922. https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.4145 Phillips, Emrys; Finlayson, Andrew; Bradwell, Tom; Everest, Jez; Jones, Lee. 2014 Structural evolution triggers a dynamic reduction in active glacier length during rapid retreat: evidence from Falljökull, SE Iceland. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, 119 (10). 2194-2208. https://doi.org/10.1002/2014JF003165 Phillips, Emrys; Finlayson, Andrew; Jones, Lee. 2013 Fracturing, block-faulting and moulin development associated with progressive collapse and retreat of a polar maritime glacier: Virkisjokul-Falljokull, SE Iceland. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, 118 (3). 1545-1561. https://doi.org/10.1002/jgrf.20116 Flett, Verity; Maurice, Louise; Finlayson, Andrew; Black, Andrew; MacDonald, Alan; Everest, Jez; Kirkbride, Martin. 2017. Meltwater flow through a rapidly deglaciating glacier and foreland catchment system: Virkisjökull, SE Iceland. Hydrology Research, 48 (6). 1666-1681. https://doi.org/10.2166/nh.2017.205

  • Many mineral resource maps for areas of Great Britain at scales of 1:25000 and 1:50000 have been produced by the British Geological Survey. The maps are intended to be used for resource development, strategic planning, land-use planning, the indication of hazard in mined areas, environment assessment and as a teaching aid. The data was originally published in printed map form.

  • The UK Sand and Gravel Database was compiled during the production of the Industrial Mineral Assessment Reports. The Department of the Environment commissioned this Report series from the British Geological Survey. Data collection extended from the first IMAU report in 1969 to the last report in 1990. The dataset is complete and is derived from reports with some additional boreholes that were never published. Standard procedures were adopted for whole project. Each report studied the sand and gravel resources of an area of between one hundred and two hundred square kilometres. Specially commissioned boreholes on a one kilometre grid basis were used in conjunction with existing geological knowledge to make a resource level assessment of the volume and quality of sand and gravel resource available. A total of 12,563 boreholes were drilled, 53,721 Lithological units described and 54,128 samples collected and graded. This information is presented in the appendixes of the individual reports and as a single database. Data collection is complete. Only factual corrections to the data are occasionally made. The dataset includes the borehole location, total depth, unit thickness, unit lithologies, and grading information.

  • This dataset is an index of the Survey Collection of fossils for Scotland and Northern England. It is the digital equivalent of the analogue (card) index. The latter contains some 31k records, c.70% of which has been transcribed. The continually growing Survey Collection comprises about 450k samples (including nearly 30k specimens from the John Smith Collection) which are individually registered in c.150 leather bound volumes. The Oracle relational database BGS_FOSSLOC is a first step in ascertaining what registered fossil materials exist for certain areas, who collected them and when, their geographical and stratigraphical details, the type of collection (whether from boreholes or exposures), and any covering technical reports. It is also a pathway to an extensive and unique collection of paper graphic logs, some 18k of which record annotated information on fossil occurrences and assemblages at certain stratigraphical levels (particularly in the Carboniferous) in Scotland and Northern England.

  • Data from geophysical surveys in many South American and Caribbean countries carried out by the British Geological Survey for different agencies. The surveys range from regional gravity and airborne magnetic mapping to targetted surveys for mineral and water. Individual surveys do not yet have metadata entries: this entry describes a notional database that represents all geophysical surveys carried out within the region.

  • This dataset contains records of the BGS analytical chemistry laboratories prior to the year 2000. It is basically an archive of original records and includes card indexes, files and raw analytical data. Files may contain background detail on the samples themselves but coverage is variable; information has been collected over many years in different formats. Different analytical techniques have been used over the years; consequently data are of variable quality as systems have improved with time. Samples analysed could be from anywhere in the world and were usually analysed for internal BGS customers. These are paper records and are available for viewing or copying. Any constraints on data usage would be dependant on individual files. Anyone wishing to access the records would require assistance from staff familiar with the data.

  • High frequency (100 Hz) data from two horizontal induction coils measuring the Earth's magnetic field at the Eskdalemuir Observatory in the United Kingdom. The data covers the period from January 2014 to December 2014. Also included are examples of Matlab code and the frequency calibration files to convert to the raw data to SI units. Thumbnail spectrograms and metadata about the setup and equipment is also supplied.

  • The data set is sequences of microorganisms that were isolated or determined by direct DNA extraction from the Eyjafjallajökull Iceland lava flows. The data is held in BLAST as follows: Clone 16S rRNA gene sequences have been deposited in GenBank under accession numbers HQ898914 to HQ900366.