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  • The data consists of names, types, voltages, constraint status and national grid references for 56,865 electricity substations (33 kV or larger) in Great Britain in 2018. It was compiled from information on individual transmission or distribution network operator websites and interpreted to produce a classification of constraint status (where applicable). The data set was compiled from information on individual transmission or distribution network operator websites. The work was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council Award NE/M019713/1. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0eed5c99-f409-4329-a98e-47f496bb88a2

  • This dataset contains the results of a sanitary risk inspection for different groundwater sources in Kisumu, Kenya. A total of 70 groundwater sources were surveyed between February and March 2014. The survey took the form of an observation checklist that identified contamination hazards at well heads and in their immediate surroundings. Data on well depth, electro-conductivity, pH and temperature were also collected. The data were collected as part of the Groundwater2030 project, which aims to reduce the health problems that result from consumption of contaminated groundwater in urban areas of Africa. The project was co-ordinated by the University of Southampton, with partners at the University of Surrey, the Victoria Institute of Research on Environment and Development (VIRED) International, and the Jaramogi Oginga Odinga University of Science and Technology. The project was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council and the Department for International Development as part of the Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poor (UPGro) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/bc1a979b-7cc9-4c9d-9fe4-a8510cd62f8e

  • The dataset contains the chemical composition of anaerobic digestates derived from source-segregated food waste & agro-waste, with and without biomass ash, after the addition commercial polymer to enhance dewaterability. A preliminary experiment was carried to determine the type of polymer and its optimum dose (WP1A1). Then, polymer was added to digestate and digestate/ash blends, let react for short-time and physically separated into their fiber and liquid fractions (WP1A2). These experiments were carried out in the laboratory during 2016, being measured via a combination of internal and external laboratories. Preliminary experiment (WP1A1) contains data on polymer type, dose and mass added as well as supernatant and solids separated. Main experiment contain data on masses (dry & total solids), supernatant volume, pH and plant macro-nutrients profile (total concentration of Ca, Mg, P, K, TKN and S). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2977fc7b-f83e-4696-b06b-2f589ffa6965

  • This report is a contribution to the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA5) conducted by the Department of Trade and Industry (now Department of Energy and Climate Change). A review of the coastal distribution and abundance of swans and geese in the SEA 5 area, including migration routes, key feeding areas and roosting areas was carried out. A review of the potential impacts of offshore wind farms on swans and geese was also conducted. The study area was defined as the east coast of Scotland from the English border north to John O' Groats, including Orkney and Shetland, and the offshore waters in the SEA 5 area. The review considered nine species: mute swan, Bewick's swan, whooper swan, bean goose, pinkfooted goose, white-fronted goose, greylag goose, barnacle goose and brent goose. Offshore wind farms may impact birds directly by mortality from collisions or indirectly by displacement from migratory flyways or local flight paths. At present there are very little data on the effects of offshore wind farms on swans and geese. Of the nine species reviewed, five species, whooper swan, mute swan, pink-footed goose, greylag goose and barnacle goose occur in internationally important numbers at coastal sites in the SEA5 area. Greenland white-fronted goose occur in nationally important numbers.

  • This report is a contribution to the Department of Trade and Industry's (now Department of Energy and Climate Change) Strategic Environmental Assessment SEA2. Eight marine mammal species occur regularly over large parts the North Sea: harbour seal, grey seal, harbour porpoise, bottlenose dolphin, white-beaked dolphin, Atlantic white-sided dolphin, killer whale and minke whale. A further 15 cetacean species and five pinniped species are reported less frequently in the region. This report describes the distribution and abundance of these mammals and their ecological importance. The harbour porpoise is the most numerous marine mammal in the North Sea, with a population estimated at 268,000 in summer 1994. The northern and central SEA2 areas are particularly important areas for the harbour porpoise. Marine mammals make use of sound for a variety of purposes: finding prey, detecting predators, communication and probably navigation. The offshore oil and gas industry generates underwater noise at every stage of the process: during exploration seismic surveys, drilling, production and decommissioning. The effects of these different sources of underwater noise on marine mammals are discussed. The use of explosives for underwater cutting and demolition during the decommissioning of platforms and installations may pose a serious threat to some marine mammals. The effects of pollution on seals and cetaceans are discussed, including the effects of oil spills. Large whales can be killed by being struck by ships; increased shipping traffic in an area would increase this threat.

  • This report is a contribution to the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA3) conducted by the Department of Trade and Industry (now Department of Energy and Climate Change). This study provides forecast information on probable activity levels, capital expenditure, tax revenues and employment resulting from exploration and production in the SEA3 area. The SEA3 area comprises 330 blocks or part blocks in the Central and Southern North Sea. Estimates were made of the reserves which might be discovered or developed. A cautious view was taken of the number of new developments which might emanate from licensing the area. The related exploration, appraisal, development and decommissioning costs were then estimated. Economic modelling was undertaken for different oil and gas prices to calculate for each development gross revenues, development costs, operating costs, and decommissioning costs. The taxation implications were also calculated. The impact of licensing the SEA3 area on the level of employment in the UK has been calculated. The proposed licensing would make a modest but worthwhile contribution towards moderating the downward trend of employment in the North Sea industry.

  • This document is intended to provide an introduction for non-specialists to the key activities and potential sources of environmental effects associated with oil and gas exploration and production. It forms part of the information base for the Department of Trade and Industry's (now Department of Energy and Climate Change) Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA2) process in the North Sea.

  • This report is a contribution to the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA6) conducted by the Department of Trade and Industry (now Department of Energy and Climate Change). This report considers the major sources of contamination to the Irish Sea from offshore energy installations and puts them in the context of other sources of contamination to the region. The report also considers contamination of the wider environment, making use of data provided by monitoring programmes and other specific studies. The oil and gas industry in the Irish Sea is small by comparison to that of the North Sea, but bears comparison to that of the Southern North Sea which is dominated by gas production and for which many of the platforms are in relatively shallow water. The discharge of production and drilling chemicals, residual oil and compounds derived from the formation water co-produced with the oil or gas contribute to the contamination concentration in sediments and water. However, in Liverpool Bay and Morecambe Bay, where the oil and gas fields are located, the riverine inputs of major groups of organic contaminants and metals are found to be several orders of magnitude greater than those from the offshore oil and gas industry. Inputs of artificial radionuclides into the Irish Sea are dominated by discharges from Sellafield on the Cumbrian coast. The distribution of radionuclides in seawater, in the sediment and in biota are reviewed.

  • This dataset provides numbers and types of plastic particles extracted from sediment samples of three tributaries of the river Thames: the River Leach, the River Lambourn and The Cut. These rivers are regularly monitored for a range of water quality and biological characteristics as part of the ongoing CEH Thames initiative project. Four sampling sites were selected based on the average percentage of effluent present in the river and population equivalent density to represent scenarios ranging from low sewage input and population equivalent density (Leach and Lanbourn) through an intermediate site (the Cut) to a site with high sewage input and population equivalent density (also in the Cut). The samples were collected between late August and early September 2014. The data provides information on the site characteristics, dry weight of sediment analysed (in grams), number of microplastic particles extracted and characteristics of particles (including shape, colour and polymer type). Types of polymers identified include: polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, polyethylene terephthalate, nylon and polyester. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/93837492-408f-4349-8dcd-ee833e84e47e

  • This dataset contains free residual chlorine, turbidity, nitrate, chloride, sulphate, fluoride, phosphate and thermatolerant coliform concentrations in groundwater from a variety of sources within two neighbourhoods of Kisumu, Kenya. A total of 73 groundwater sources were tested between February and March 2014. The data were collected as part of the Groundwater2030 project, which aims to reduce the health problems that result from consumption of contaminated groundwater in urban areas of Africa. The project was co-ordinated by the University of Southampton, with partners at the University of Surrey, the Victoria Institute of Research on Environment and Development (VIRED) International, and the Jaramogi Oginga Odinga University of Science and Technology. The project was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council and the Department for International Development as part of the Unlocking the Potential of Groundwater for the Poor (UPGro) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4062e6d9-2e90-4775-87f1-179dea283ef1