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  • This dataset contains daily water discharge data from Trout Beck in the Moor House-Upper Teesdale National Nature Reserve in the northern Pennines, Cumbria, UK. Data were automatically recorded at a gauging station located on a weir on the Trout Beck and collated by a variety of staff at the Moor House Research Station on behalf of the Wear and Tees River Board and the National Rivers Authority. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9e044339-dd06-4f69-b93c-40a79562931c

  • This document data set contains paper copies of selected geophysical borehole logs made from the master data set held by the BGS National Geological Records Centre (NGRC) at Keyworth. These have been made for interpretation. Most data are within the UK onshore area; although there are some UK near-shore and offshore (North Sea, Irish Sea) and foreign data. Most data were acquired for commercial hydrocarbon exploration and subsequently provided to BGS for use on specific projects. Some data were acquired by BGS and other public-sector bodies for research purposes (e.g. geothermal energy). The documents are dyeline prints or plain-paper photocopies. They are stored folded in boxes, approx 20 logs per box, approx 500 boxes. There are some duplicates. Only a sub-set of the available borehole logs have been copied, usually for deep boreholes or boreholes of special significance in the interpretation of seismic data. Mostly concentrated in areas prospective for coal, oil and gas.

  • The Samburu - Marsabit Geological Mapping and Mineral Exploration Project was a joint Kenyan and British technical co-operation project, carried out by staff of the Mines and Geological Department, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, Kenya and staff from the British Geological Survey. The first phase of the project commenced in 1980, and covered the area between 36degrees and 38degrees E and from the equator to 2degrees N. The second phase, carried out between 1984 and 1986 covered the area between 36degrees and 38degrees E and from 2degrees N to the Ethiopian border. Sampling was carried out concurrently with geological mapping and was largely constrained by the requirements of that exercise. Little or no sampling was done in areas previously mapped by other bodies. Sampling was mainly confined to areas underlain by basement rocks of the Mozambique Belt and was very sparse over most of the Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic cover. Chemical analyses for the stream sediments were: Ag, Ba, Co, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sr, and Zn. Raw data is available from the Mines and Geological Survey Department, Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, Nairobi, Kenya. Sampling densities varied considerably across the Phase 1 project area, but generally a stream sediment sample density of one per 4 to 8 km2 and a panned concentrate density of one per 13 to 16 km2 was achieved. In the Phase 2 area, which was mainly very arid, a few samples were collected from dry stream beds, as part of a helicopter survey of the area, to provide some idea of the geochemistry of the major lithological units. Stream sediments were collected by combining grab samples from 5 to 10 points within a 10m radius of the selected site. If necessary the samples were dried before being sieved and the fine (-80 mesh B.S.) fraction retained for analysis. Heavy mineral concentrates were obtained by taking 2 to 5kg of material from the sample site and panning at the base camp, where water was available, or at the Mines and Geological Department headquarters at Nairobi.

  • This document data set contains paper copies of many of the seismic reflection survey sections from the original seismic sections data set (ORIGSEISECS) . These have been made for interpretation. Most data are within the UK onshore area; although there are some UK near-shore and offshore (North Sea, Irish Sea) and foreign data. Most data were acquired for commercial hydrocarbon exploration and subsequently provided to BGS for use on specific projects. Some data were acquired by BGS and other public-sector bodies, e.g. BIRPS (British Institutes Reflection Profiling Syndicate ), for academic research. The documents are dyeline prints or plain-paper photocopies. They are stored folded in boxes, approx 40 sections per box, approx 530 boxes. There are a lot of duplicates, there being an interpreted and uninterpreted copy of many profiles. Mostly concentrated in areas prospective for coal, oil and gas.

  • Database of hydrogeological properties measured on core samples. Contains most determinations generated by BGS Wallingford Physical Properties Lab but some data is only available on paper. High quality data produced to strict laboratory quality standards.

  • Index to BGS geological map 'Standards', manuscript and published maps for Great Britain produced by the Survey on County Series (1:10560) and National Grid (1:10560 & 1:10000) Ordnance Survey base maps. 'Standards' are the best interpretation of the geology at the time they were produced. The Oracle index was set up in 1988, current holdings are over 41,000 maps. There are entries for all registered maps, but not all fields are complete on all entries.

  • Data from onshore wells provided to BGS as part of an agreement with OGA/DECC. Digital data (includes, well logs, well reports and downhole data) for oil and gas exploration and appraisal wells drilled in the UK and held on behalf of the Oil & Gas Authority (formerly the Department of Energy and Climate Change). External data therefore BGS has no control on quality. Provided to OGA/DECC/BGS by oil companies as part of their obligations under licensing regulations, PON 9b regulations notice.

  • Series of water/rock and water/mineral interaction experiments at a range of temperatures and pressures. Most experimental runs now held in Excel spreadsheets. All runs held as paper records in the laboratory. Analytical results also held in Excel format. Kinetic information held in Access database for a range of minerals. Also have several reference datasets in Hypercard and End Note.

  • Miscellaneous geological records for Scotland and Northern England of current or semi-current interest filed in order of accession. Some 65 accessions held which will be subject to review for permanent retention/destruction. Dataset created c.1970 and Indexed on Land Survey Record Index Database.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:625 000 providing a simplified interpretation of the geology and may be used as a guide at a regional or national level, but should not be relied on for local geology. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland, the Isle of Man and Northern Ireland. Data are supplied as four themes: bedrock, superficial deposits, dykes and linear features (faults). Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy of the rocks. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Superficial deposits are younger geological deposits formed during the most recent geological time; the Quaternary. These deposits rest on older rocks or deposits referred to as bedrock. The superficial deposits theme defines landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with a geological name and their deposit-type or lithological composition. The dykes theme defines small, narrow areas (shown as polygons) of a specific type of bedrock geology; that is igneous rocks which have been intruded into the landscape at a later date than the surrounding bedrock. They are presented as an optional, separate theme in order to provide additional clarity of the bedrock theme. The bedrock and dykes themes are designed to be used together. Linear features data (shown as polylines) represents geological faults at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Geological faults occur where a body of bedrock has been fractured and displaced by large scale processes affecting the earth's crust (tectonic forces). The faults theme defines geological faults (shown as polylines) at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). All four data themes are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are delivered free of charge under the terms of the Open Government Licence.