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2010

521 record(s)
 
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  • This dataset provides the location details of Environmental Change Network (ECN) sites from which data are collected. There are 12 terrestrial sites and 45 freshwater sites. Sites range from upland to lowland, moor land to chalk grassland, small ponds and streams to large rivers and lakes. ECN is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. A wide range of integrated physical, chemical and biological variables which drive and respond to environmental change are collated, quality controlled and made freely available for scientific research. The data form an important evidence base for UK environmental policy development. ECN is a multi-agency programme sponsored by a consortium of fourteen government departments and agencies. These organisations contribute to the programme through funding either site monitoring and/or network co-ordination activities. These organisations are: Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, Cyfoeth Naturiol Cymru - Natural Resources Wales, Defence Science & Technology Laboratory, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, Environment Agency, Forestry Commission, Llywodraeth Cymru - Welsh Government, Natural England, Natural Environment Research Council, Northern Ireland Environment Agency, Scottish Environment Protection Agency, Scottish Government and Scottish Natural Heritage.

  • This datset contains operational taxonomic units for epilithon eukaryotes (water samples): Approximate location of sampling sites was determined from maps to provide good spatial coverage of the Wold River through to the Tamar River. Exact sites were determined in the field, considering accessibility and other logistics. The exact location of each sample site was determined using a Garmin GPS12. Three stones were taken from each of the 20 locations and epilithon removed from a defined area. Samples were kept in the cold and removed to the laboratory for analyses. DNA was extracted from all soil and epilithon samples using the MOBIO Powersoil 96 well DNA extraction kit. DNA was quality checked for purity and yield prior to submission for 454 pyrosequencing to assess both bacterial and eukaryotic biodiversity within each sample. Following bioinformatic sequence processing, sequencing were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTU) and the data tables display the percentage of each OTU within each sample. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/18023db5-25d8-44f7-b291-61869f937367

  • The data are biomass and ozone-injury data for white clover (Trifolium repens). Dataset concerns a 2014 study on the effects of Jasmonic acid/cutting in modulating the response of clover to ozone. A short-term (4-week) ozone-exposure experiment was conducted in 2014 to investigate the interactive effects of cutting on ozone-induced responses in white clover (Trifolium repens). A strong interaction was found in root biomass and root nodule biomass in cut white clover plants in a high ozone background (45-67 parts per billion (ppb) treatment mean), suggesting ozone-impacts on root nodule biomass occur through limitation of carbon availability. The work was carried out as part of a NERC funded PhD. Project number NEC04456 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/10c6df00-c7ef-444b-951f-33a2c0072bec

  • Data includes impacts on root nodule biomass, stomatal conductance, injury rates, and N-fixation in the white clover cultivar (T. repens cv. crusader). An ozone-exposure experiment was conducted in solardomes during the spring and summer of year 2012 on modern clover (Trifolium spp.) cultivars. The effects of ozone pollution (30, 35, 40, 45, 52, 67 parts per billion (ppb) treatment means) on the growth and functioning of the clover cultivars was investigated. Both cultivars had positive increases in ozone-injury rates, although stomatal conductance was unaffected by ozone exposure. Reductions in root nodule biomass and nodule number occurred in white clover, and red clover displayed an increase in nodule density. Nitrogen fixation rates were suppressed in white clover, which could have important implications for the sustainability of managed pasture. The work was carried out as part of a NERC funded PhD. Project number NEC04456. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b63fbb6c-5030-43a1-b0ea-160bb5a83078

  • Data includes raw shoot biomass and yield, production and gas exchange, nodulation and N-fixation and forage quality data, including relative and consumable food values. The impacts of ozone on the growth and functioning of high-sugar ryegrass pasture mesocosms was assessed in year 2013. Pasture mesocosms, containing perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L) and white clover (Trifolium repens L), were grown in the early spring and exposed to ozone in solardomes from late April 2013 to the end of September 2013. Ozone (30, 35, 40, 45, 52, 67 parts per billion (ppb) treatment means) had a large effect on the pasture mesocosms. The work was carried out as part of a NERC funded PhD. Project number NEC04456. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e0bcdc39-ab79-413c-bf76-d6ffbc510f15

  • This dataset contains modelled outputs of the European river network modelled as 33,668 cells (5° longitude by 5° latitude). For each cell, modelled monthly flows were generated for an ensemble of tenscenarios for the 2050s and for the study baseline (naturalized flows for 1961 to 1990). Score classes are categorisation of flow alteration scenarios. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d8ef71eb-3d22-4f98-af15-9d8e046ccb63

  • The data are biomass measurements from an ozone exposure experiment, during which Trifolium repens and Lolium perenne were exposed as both monocultures and two-species mixtures to an episodic rural ozone regime in large, well-watered containers within solardomes for 12 weeks. Treatments were elevated ozone (AOT40 (Accumulated Ozone Threshold exposure of 40 parts per billion) of 12.86 ppm h) or control conditions (AOT40 of 0.02 ppm h). Measurements were dry weight, with a cutting height of 7cm above soil level. The distribution of plant material within the canopy was determined by separating material growing in the upper canopy (>14cm) from the canopy edge and the inner canopy for both species. The experiments were carried out in the CEH Bangor Air Pollution Facility. Work was funded by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology Integrating Fund Initiative. The observed decreases in photosynthetic efficiency and capacity in elevated ozone indicate that the ability of such ubiquitous vegetation to act as a sink for atmospheric carbon may be reduced in future climates. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5de90f7a-dec9-4bd5-af52-d0873a09d25d

  • The dataset consists of ACi (net CO2 assimilation rate, A, versus calculated substomatal CO2 concentration, Ci) curve data from an ozone experiment during which Trifolium repens and Lolium perenne were exposed as both monocultures and two-species mixtures to an episodic rural ozone regime in large, well-watered containers within solardomes for 12 weeks. Treatments were elevated ozone (AOT40 (Accumulated Ozone Threshold exposure of 40 parts per billion) of 12.86 ppm h) or control conditions (AOT40 of 0.02 ppm h). ACi curves were carried out mid-way and at the end of the exposure period using a Portable Photosynthesis System, CIRAS (PP-Systems) to calculate the photosynthetic parameters Jmax (maximum rate of photosynthetic electron transport) and Vcmax (maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylase activity). The observed decreases in photosynthetic efficiency and capacity in elevated ozone indicate that the ability of such ubiquitous vegetation to act as a sink for atmospheric carbon may be reduced in future climates. The experiment was carried out at the CEH Bangor Air Pollution Facility. This work was funded by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology Integrating Fund Initiative. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f14b9056-ccc0-4887-812e-c004f613a138

  • This dataset contains yield data for wheat, oilseed rape and field beans grown in fields under different agri-environment practices. The fields were located at the Hillesden Estate in Buckinghamshire, UK, where a randomised block experiment had been implemented to examine the effects of converting differing proportions of arable land to wildlife habitat. The fields were planted with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) followed by break crops of either oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) or field beans (Vicia faba L.). Three treatments were applied at random: a control ("business as usual"), Entry Level Stewardship (ELS) treatment and ELS Extra treatment. The ELS treatment involved removing 1% of land to create wildlife habitats. The ELS Extra had a greater proportion of land removed (6%) and additional wildlife habitats included. The total yield of each crop was measured at the time of harvesting using a yield meter attached to the combine harvester. From these values, yield per hectare and the ratio of crop yield to regional average yield were calculated. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e54069b6-71a9-4b36-837f-a5e3ee65b4de

  • This is a web map service (WMS) of Digital Surface Model (DSM) data in South West England at a 1m resolution. The DSM covers an area of 9424 km2 that includes all the land west of Exmouth (i.e. west of circa 3 degrees 21 minutes West). The DSM includes the height of features on the bare earth such as buildings or vegetation (if present). The dataset is a part of outcomes from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology South West (SW) Project.