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2010

517 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 517
  • This research sought to explore the pattern of population movement (direction, rate, permanency) along a hypothesised route from Africa to Australasia during Oxygen Isotope Stage 4. Using GIS-based analyses and hypothetical models of population movement, potential routes out of East Africa were generated and examined. The goal of these analyses was to assess the viability of particular routes, and consider them in terms of ecological and geographical constraints. As a result, several routes through Africa, Arabia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Australasia were proposed and evaluated. These routes have been further examined with regards to archaeological site location, the timing of human presence in South Asia, and biological indicators of human diversity.

  • A dataset of historical sediment Carbon and Nitrogen isotope measurements from lake cores (n=95) spanning the range of lake types and catchments found across the UK. These data have been obtained from the Environmental Change Research Centre (ECRC) lake sediment core archive with well-resolved time intervals (1850, 1900, 1980 and present) determined by radiometric dating (210Pb; 137Cs). This data has been collated to investigate historical sources and accumulation of C and N in lakes. This dataset provides historical data for hydrological / nutrient modelling from the Long Term Large Scale (LTLS) Project in the NERC Macronutrients programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4b53b1d7-f290-4b47-97e9-9f9ec79f3003

  • The data consist of eight datasets on stickleback fish personality data. Data are on catch order, mean time spent out of cover, proportion of time fish spent out of cover, sex differences for the catch order, sex differences for the catch order on two occasions and sex differences in the proportion of time spent out of cover. A laboratory population of three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) were filmed and timed using a high definition camera. The work was carried out between March 2012 and February 2013 at The Structure and Motion Laboratory, Royal Veterinary College.The work was funded by a BBSRC studentship and NERC (grant NE/H016600/2 Does diversity deliver? How variation in individual knowledge and behavioural traits impact on the performance of animal groups) All animal care and experimental procedures described here were approved as non-regulatory procedures by the Ethics and Welfare Committee of the Royal Veterinary College, London (URN 2011 1084). Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9c7fe956-0ae6-46b6-bca2-2be5778e46bd

  • This is a web map service (WMS) of Digital Terrain Model (DTM) data in South West England at a 1m resolution. The DTM covers an area of 9424 km2 that includes all the land west of Exmouth (i.e. west of circa 3 degrees 21 minutes West). The DTM represents the topographic model (height) of the bare earth. The dataset is a part of outcomes from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology South West (SW) Project.

  • Data comprise species level descriptions of macroinvertebrate communities and habitat descriptions from wadeable rivers of the Thames catchment, in the United Kingdom (UK), sampled over three seasons in the years 2009 - 2010. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5700501d-feb4-445d-aa08-81a158e54bac

  • This datset contains operational taxonomic units for epilithon eukaryotes (water samples): Approximate location of sampling sites was determined from maps to provide good spatial coverage of the Wold River through to the Tamar River. Exact sites were determined in the field, considering accessibility and other logistics. The exact location of each sample site was determined using a Garmin GPS12. Three stones were taken from each of the 20 locations and epilithon removed from a defined area. Samples were kept in the cold and removed to the laboratory for analyses. DNA was extracted from all soil and epilithon samples using the MOBIO Powersoil 96 well DNA extraction kit. DNA was quality checked for purity and yield prior to submission for 454 pyrosequencing to assess both bacterial and eukaryotic biodiversity within each sample. Following bioinformatic sequence processing, sequencing were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTU) and the data tables display the percentage of each OTU within each sample. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/18023db5-25d8-44f7-b291-61869f937367

  • This data provides the results of a survey of the water quality of small streams draining forested and felled catchments across Wales. The water quality measurements are extensive, including analysis of major, minor, trace and ultra-trace elements together with nutrient and standard water quality measures such as pH and Gran alkalinity. Opportunistic sampling was undertaken with the aid for Forest Enterprise staff to sample sites at periods of both dry and very wet weather in order to assess the water quality under baseflow and stormflow conditions, respectively, to assess groundwater and soil endmember chemistries. The work was undertaken as part of a joint NERC, Environment Agency and Forestry Commission funded study to examine the impacts of conifer harvesting and replanting on upland water quality (Neal et al., 1998). Small catchment sites (2 to 5 ha) were chosen single tree and soil type at each location. Across the sites, the number of samplings varied between 1 and 10 depending upon feasibility of sampling. The monitoring period was from the 7th September 1995 up to the 18th November 1997.The scope and range of the Welsh survey work together with the findings are provided by Neal et al., 1998. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6361c484-42bd-4e0c-874f-ef22dc55129f

  • COBRA (impact of COmbined iodine and Bromine Release on the Arctic atmosphere) is a UK IPY (International Polar Year) consortium that aims to investigate the release mechanisms of iodine in the Arctic and the potential combined effects of iodine and bromine on its atmosphere. The team measured reactive inorganic halogens (BrO, IO, OIO, I2), O3, Hg, HOx, HCHO, NOx, VOCs and reactive halocarbons from temporary laboratories located on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay, north of Kuujjuarapik, during February-March 2008. Met balloons and O3 sondes were launched daily. COBRA set up an ice camp and flux chamber experiments ~500 m into the bay to directly measure halogen emissions and ozone deposition, and measured physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the sea-ice (and potentially of frost flowers) at different depths. The project is linked with OOTI, which carried out a simultaneous field experiment at Kuujjuarapik.

  • Data from observations made at the The Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (16.848N, 24.871W) which exists to advance understanding of climatically significant interactions between the atmosphere and ocean and to provide a regional focal point and long-term data. The observatory is based on Calhau Island of São Vicente, Cape Verde in the tropical Eastern North Atlantic Ocean, a region which is data poor but plays a key role in atmosphere-ocean interactions of climate-related and biogeochemical parameters including greenhouse gases. It is an open-ocean site that is representative of a region likely to be sensitive to future climate change, and is minimally influenced by local effects and intermittent continental pollution. The dataset contains mixing ratios of Acetic acid, Formic acid, HCl, Nitric acid, Ammonia gas and Nitrous acid gas from the University of Virginia Tandem mist chambers during the SOLAS-RHAMBLE intensive campaign.

  • Data from observations made at the The Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory (16.848N, 24.871W) which exists to advance understanding of climatically significant interactions between the atmosphere and ocean and to provide a regional focal point and long-term data. The observatory is based on Calhau Island of São Vicente, Cape Verde in the tropical Eastern North Atlantic Ocean, a region which is data poor but plays a key role in atmosphere-ocean interactions of climate-related and biogeochemical parameters including greenhouse gases. It is an open-ocean site that is representative of a region likely to be sensitive to future climate change, and is minimally influenced by local effects and intermittent continental pollution. The dataset contains mixing ratio measurements of OH and HO2 from University of Leeds.