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  • Programme of research funded by the Natural Environment Research Council. URGENT aims to stimulate the regeneration of the urban environment through understanding and managing the interaction of natural and man-made processes. Projects throughout the UK first set up in 1997 and completed in 2005. It was supported by partners from British industry, local authorities and Government agencies. A total of 40 URGENT projects in four key areas - air, water, soil and ecology. The projects aim was to determine the magnitude of urban environmental problems and risks, to understand the underlying patterns and processes that affect them, and to produce effective strategies for control and managment which will be accessible to users both in the UK and abroad.

  • Registers of macrofossils in 127 volumes, covers the whole of the UK. Within each volume, data is arranged sequentially usually by collectors no. The data set began with the first Palaeontologist in the Geological Survey of Great Britain.

  • Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. The joint Public Health England (PHE) –British Geological Survey (BGS) digital Indicative Atlas of radon in Great Britain presents an overview of the results of detailed mapping of radon potential, defined as the estimated percentage of homes in an area above the radon Action Level. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. PHE (formerly the Health Protection Agency (HPA)) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average is at or above 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3). This is termed the Action Level. Public Health England defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration at or above the Action Level of 200 Bq m-3. The Indicative Atlas of radon in Great Britain presents a simplified version of the radon potential for Great Britain with each 1-km grid square being classed according to the highest radon potential found within it, so is indicative rather than definitive. The joint PHE-BGS digital radon potential for Great Britain provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Great Britain. The Indicative Atlas of radon in Great Britain is published in two documents. The area of England and Wales is published in MILES J.C.H, APPLETON J.D, REES D.M, GREEN B.M.R, ADLAM K.A.M and MYERS, A.H., 2007. Indicative Atlas of Radon in England and Wales. ISBN: 978-0-85951-608-2. 29 pp). The corresponding publication for Scotland is MILES J.C.H, APPLETON J.D, REES D.M, ADLAM K.A.M, GREEN B.M.R, and SCHEIB, C., 2011. Indicative Atlas of Radon in Scotland.).

  • Paper records and photos used to create the Nottingham Caves digital register and maps. Includes archival material of the caves known to BGS, around northern and central Nottingham. Data mainly captured in 1989, infrequent since then approximately 1 per year.

  • The BGS Stratigraphical Masterpack Series aims to provide high quality biostratigraphical information modules for industry. It is envisaged that the majority of clients will be among the exploration, extraction, construction and consultancy sectors. The topics of these packages are designed, as far as possible,to be relevant to industrial needs by, for example, focusing on a particular frontier exploration area or documenting a fossil group of major interest. They act as practical desk-top guides for routine reference work and are also the basis for in-house staff training. The latest Masterpacks are PC based. There are four titles currently available for purchase from BGS: 1.Reference Collection of British Jurassic Dinoflagellates 2.Jurassic Dinoflagellate Cysts from Skye, NW Scotland 3.Stratigraphic Masterpack on Carboniferous Palynostratigraphy - The Arctic to North Africa 4.Palaeozoic Palynostratigraphy of North Africa, The Middle East & Gulf Region: An Integrated Database

  • Stored in Murchison House, this dataset (FAUNGRAPHLOG_ED) is the BGS UK (North) collection of paper graphic logs from boreholes and measured natural sections, particularly in the Carboniferous of Scotland and northern England. Some 18000 of these records include hand written macrofossil occurrences and assemblages from certain (often subsequently interpreted) stratigraphical levels in the borehole or section. There is at present no separate index (either analogue or digital) to FAUNGRAPHLOG_ED but a pathway to it is FOSSLOC, the index to the Survey Collection of fossils from UK (North).

  • Global Coordination of Atmospheric Electricity Measurements (GloCAEM) project brought these experts together to make the first steps towards an effective global network for FW atmospheric electricity monitoring by holding workshops to discuss measurement practises and instrumentation, as well as establish recording and archiving procedures to archive electric field data in a standardised, easily accessible format, then by creating a central data repository. This project was funded in the UK under NERC grant NE/N013689/1. This dataset contains measurements of atmospheric electricity and electric potential gradient made using a Cambell Scientific CS110 electric-field mill at Graciosa Azores.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with type of mass movement e.g. landslip. The scale of the data is 1:50 000 scale. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Mass movement describes areas where deposits have moved down slope under gravity to form landslips. These landslips can affect bedrock, superficial or artificial ground. Mass movement deposits are described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme Volume 4. However the data also includes foundered strata, where ground has collapsed due to subsidence (this is not described in the Rock Classification Scheme). Caution should be exercised with this data; historically BGS has not always recorded mass movement events and due to the dynamic nature of occurrence significant changes may have occurred since the data was released. The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • The collection comprises photographic half plate black & white negative and 35mm colour transparency copies of plans of mine workings for haematite, gypsum, limestone, baryte and metalliferous minerals for Cumbria dating from 1872 onwards. The plans were originally deposited in compliance with the Coal and Metalliferous Mines Regulation acts. The original plans are currently held by Cumbria County Record Office on behalf of the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) and total about 1240 plans. No digital index is available but a paper catalogue is provided by the Health & Safety Executive. As the collection relates to plans of mines abandoned after the 1872 Act, the holdings are fairly complete after this date. Note however, that the Metalliferous Mines Act originally applied only to mines employing more than 12 men, (eg. some limestone mines). Coal Authority may hold non-coal mine plans not covered by Mine Abandonment Plan collection.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:50 000 scale. Onshore coverage is provided for all of England, Wales, Scotland and the Isle of Man. Superficial deposits are the youngest geological deposits formed during the most recent period of geological time, the Quaternary, which extends back about 2.58 million years from the present. They lie on top of older deposits or rocks referred to as bedrock. Superficial deposits were laid down by various natural processes such as action by ice, water, wind and weathering. As such, the deposits are denoted by their BGS Lexicon name, which classifies them on the basis of mode of origin (lithogenesis) with names such as, 'glacial deposits', 'river terrace deposits' or 'blown sand'; or on the basis of their composition such as 'peat'. Most of these superficial deposits are unconsolidated sediments such as gravel, sand, silt and clay. The digital data includes attribution to identify each deposit type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volume 4). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.