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  • Soil samples collected in urban areas throughout the UK are analysed for their major and trace element geochemistry, their pH and organic matter content. Samples are collected at two depths; 0-15cm and 35-45cm at sites selected using a stratified, random design. The data can be used to identify and prioritize contaminated sites. In 1993, the Geochemical Baseline Survey Of The Environm (G-BASE) rural geochemical mapping programme was extended to include sampling in urban areas and to date around 22 urban centres have been sampled. Data is available on key inorganic contaminants including Cr, Cu, Cd, Ni, As, Pb, Zn, Sn and Sb. Results have been standardised to ensure seamless joins between geochemical sampling campaigns. Urban centres are selected in areas where rural sampling is undertaken or where the BGS urban programme is active. Urban centres will continue to be sampled until completion of the rural programme, scheduled for 2015.

  • Digital GIS mineral planning permission polygons from 1947 to 1985 as digitised from the Ministry of Housing and Local Government Planning Permission Maps and Cards (see associated metadata for MHLG Maps, Cards and Scanned Maps ). Data digitised included all planning permissions granted, withdrawn and refused for local authority areas for all of England. Currently 32,000 separate planning permission polygons have been captured from the maps and attributed using the associated card index.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:25 000 scale. Onshore coverage is partial and BGS has no intention to create a national coverage at this scale. Areas covered are essentially special areas of 'classic' geology and include Llandovery (central Wales), Coniston (Lake District) and Cuillan Hills (Isle of Skye). Data are supplied as five themes: bedrock, superficial deposits, mass movement, artificial ground and linear features. Bedrock geology describes the main mass of solid rocks forming the earth's crust. Bedrock is present everywhere, whether exposed at surface in outcrops or concealed beneath superficial deposits or water bodies. The bedrock theme defines landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. Geological names are based on the lithostratigraphic or lithodemic hierarchy. The lithostratigraphic scheme arranges rock bodies into units based on rock-type and geological time of formation. Where rock-types do not fit into the lithostratigraphic scheme, for example intrusive, deformed rocks subjected to heat and pressure resulting in new or changed rock types; then their classification is based on their rock-type or lithological composition. This assesses visible features such as texture, structure, mineralogy. Superficial deposits are younger geological deposits formed during the most recent geological time; the Quaternary. These deposits rest on older rocks or deposits referred to as bedrock. The superficial deposits theme defines landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with a geological name and their deposit-type or lithological composition. Mass movement describes areas where deposits have moved down slope under gravity to form landslips. These landslips can affect bedrock, superficial or artificial ground. Mass movement deposits are described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme Volume 4. However the data also includes foundered strata, where ground has collapsed due to subsidence (this is not described in the Rock Classification Scheme). Caution should be exercised with this data; whilst mass movement events are recorded in this layer, due to the dynamic nature of occurrence significant changes may have occurred since the data was released, as such it should be viewed as a snapshot in time (data should be regarded as at 2008). Artificial (man-made) theme (shown as polygons) indicates areas where the ground surface has been significantly modified by human activity. Whilst artificial ground may not be considered as part of the 'real geology' of bedrock and superficial deposits it does affect them. Artificial ground impacts on the near surface ground conditions which are important to human activities and economic development. Due to the constantly changing nature of land use and re-use/redevelopment, caution must be exercised when using this data as it represents a snapshot in time rather than an evolving picture hence the data may become dated very rapidly. Linear features (shown as polylines) represent geological structural features e.g. faults, folds or landforms e.g. buried channels, glacial drainage channels at the ground or bedrock surface (beneath superficial deposits). Linear features are associated most closely with the bedrock theme either as an intrinsic part of it for example marine bands or affecting it in the case of faults. However landform elements are associated with both bedrock and superficial deposits. All five data themes are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • Laboratory results for the analysis of soil samples collected from urban areas during the baseline geochemical mapping programme of Britain. Sample sites are described on field slips. Chemical results are subjected to high level of quality control in the laboratory. Results are the raw data processed (standardisation and normalisation) to give seamless geochemical images and the value added G-BASE (Geochemical Baseline Survey of the Environment) data in the BGS geochemistry database.

  • A card index storing supplementary information regarding name, operator, dates and commodity worked for each planning permission boundary recorded (drawn) on the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (MHLG) Mineral Planning Permissions Maps (see associated metadata). Information on the cards has been used to attribute the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (MHLG) Mineral Planning Permission Polygons (see associated metadata for MHLG Planning Permission Polygons).

  • These are OS 1:25000 paper maps (approximately 1400) upon which the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (currently Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG)) recorded hand drawn boundaries for permitted, withdrawn and refused mineral planning permissions and worked ground for every local authority area in England. Accompanying the maps is an associated card index (see metadata for MHLG Cards). Priority was placed on areas that were given rise to then current casework issues thus, at the time when the maintenance of the maps ended some authority information had been updated recently but other areas had not been visited for many years. Therefore, the variable completeness of the data should be kept in mind when the material is being used. Both the maps and the card index have been used to create the digital mineral planning permissions polygons (see metadata for MHLG Planning Permission Polygons). Polygons for worked ground have not been captured.

  • These are scanned and georeferenced raster versions of the 1400 Ministry of Housing and Local Government (MHLG) Mineral Planning Permissions Maps (see associated metadata). The 1:25000 scale maps recorded hand drawn boundaries for permitted, withdrawn and refused mineral planning permissions and worked ground for every local authority area in England. Accompanying the maps is an associated card index (see metadata for MHLG Cards). The mineral planning permission polygons recorded on the maps have been digitised to create vector GIS polygons (see associated metadata for MHLG Planning Permission Polygons).

  • The Index to the Primary Geological Data resulting from Open Cast Coal exploration. The index lists the content of the boxes of data, including reports, interpretations and records of research in British coalfield areas. The Index lists information on past and current workings and for future prospects. The majority of the collection was deposited with the National Geological Records Centre by the Coal Authority in July 2001, but a small number of BGS records have been added subsequently.

  • Between 2001 and 2003 BGS received approximately 1400 1:25 000 paper maps and associated card index from the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (now Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG)). The maps, originally compiled by the Minerals Division of the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (CLGs historic predecessor), contain hand drawn boundaries for permitted, withdrawn and refused mineral planning permissions, and worked ground. They also contain hand drawn boundaries for land use at each site. These 'MHLG' maps show information collated from the 1940s (retrospectively to 1930) to the mid 1980s. The index cards provide supplementary information regarding name, operator, dates and relevant local authority. Data depicted on the maps are for England only and include; [a] all planning appeals, departures and called in cases whether permitted or refused; [b] all planning permission and refusal data for various local authority areas which were obtained by Departmental officials through visits to authorities in a staged programme spread over many years. Priority was placed on areas that were giving rise to then current casework issues thus at the time when the maintenance of the maps ended (mid 1985), some authority information had been updated recently but other areas had not been visited for many years. [c] land use present at each site. Categories include: derelict areas, restored quarries (filled and unfilled), tip heaps and spoil heaps, and wet areas. The variable completeness of the data sets should be kept in mind when this material is being used. Land use polygons have been digitised from the MHLG maps and attribute information has been provided from the map legend and the appropriate card in the card index. The principal aim of the data is to show land use present in areas of land that have been affected by the extraction of minerals.

  • Primary Geological Data resulting from Open Cast Coal exploration in British coalfield areas. Maps showing the site outlines of opencast coal prospecting sites annotated with site reference number. Sites date back to the 1940s. Outlines drawn on 1:25000 scale topographic bases. The majority of the collection was deposited with the National Geological Records Centre by the Coal Authority in July 2001.