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2007

852 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 852
  • This dataset consists of freshwater pond quality data for sites across Great Britain in 2007. Data include macrophyte species records, chemistry and water quality, and environmental variables such as pollution, grazing and management, from ponds surveyed within a set of 591 1km squares across Great Britain (note - not all squares contained ponds). The survey was part of Countryside Survey, a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, and was carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and Pond Conservation. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to freshwater habitat data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data and linear habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/cbb9ee99-8078-4dc4-87de-ee99390e579e

  • This is a dataset obtained from analysis of lake sediment and overlying water from six sites along a depth gradient, in Loch Leven, Scotland, over a period of one year. Parameters measured from the water and included in the dataset are dissolved oxygen concentration, conductivity, pH, temperature, concentrations of three forms of phosphorus, and ammonium and silica concentrations. Chlorophyll a concentration measured from the sediment surface is included, and within the sediment concentrations of seven different forms of phosphorus are provided. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/76a2bd9a-fb02-4f37-91b9-4835eb31ab7b

  • This dataset consists of results of chemical analyses of single water chemistry samples, taken from headwater streams during a survey in 2007. Water samples were analysed at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology for chemical analysis of alkalinity (at pH 8.3), total oxidised nitrogen and soluble reactive phosphorus. Conductivity and pH were measured in the field using a regularly calibrated field meter. Data were collected under the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project managed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Headwater stream surveys have been carried out in 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of sites. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to headwater stream data, soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data and linear habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9d923383-4e3c-4aa4-95f5-0e5cdbc5853e

  • NERC EFCHED project, no data delivered aside from metadata.

  • The project aim was to develop process-based computer simulations of the dispersal of Homo erectus out of Africa. This involved developing realistic constraints on the patterns of vegetation and the effects of changes in global sea level. It was assumed that this migration out of Africa could be investigated through the paradigm of a single migration event, starting around 2 millions of years ago and arriving in Dmanisi around 1.8 millions of years ago. The data archived here consists of the vegetation patterns used in constructing the simulations and the patterns of climate variability used to constrain the variations in sea level and vegetation change. From these data it is possible to reproduce the simulation results. Simulation results are available from J.K. Hughes, A. Haywood, S.J. Mithen, B.W. Sellwood, P.J. Valdes (In Press) Investigating Early Hominin Dispersal Patterns : developing a framework for climate data integration. Journal Of Human Evolution.

  • Bed level data are presented from transects at the Tollesbury Managed Realignment site, after the managed breaching of the sea wall in August 1995. Twenty measurements were taken at fixed positions along transects relative to an aluminium bar placed across a pair of permanent wooden posts at either end of each transect. Measurements were made to the nearest millimetre using a ruler. All measurements were made by the data author. Data from the original transects were collected monthly from September 1995 to 1998, bimonthly up to 2000 and then in April and September to 2007. Extra transects were added in April 1999 and data collected at the same frequency. The data were collected investigate if the exposure of the agricultural land to seawater would result in the accumulation of silt. The work was funded by the Department for Environment Food & Rural Affairs (Defra) under the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) contract C00356 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f9513ece-a913-4774-8808-273dcf7ed0be

  • This dataset consists of invertebrate species records, sampled from headwater streams during a survey in 2007. Macro-invertebrates were sampled using standard protocols. The sample area in each stream was a single area of stream-bed whose major habitat types can be sampled within the recommended sampling period of three minutes of active sampling, supplemented by a one minute hand search. The length of river surveyed would normally vary from 5 to 15m. Samples were collected using a standard 1mm mesh pond net and returned to the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology for later sorting and identification. Supplemental physical measurements (width, depth, substrate composition) required to run RIVPACS (River Invertebrate Prediction and Classification System) were taken. Data were collected under the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project managed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Headwater stream surveys have been carried out in 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of sites. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to headwater stream data, soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data and linear habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/18849325-358b-4af1-b20d-d750b1c723a3

  • River Habitat Survey (RHS) data from rivers and streams surveyed in 2007 as part of the Countryside Survey project. River Habitat Survey (RHS) is an assessment of the physical structure of freshwater streams and rivers based on a standard 500m length sample unit. It does not require specialist geomorphological or botanical expertise but consistent recognition of features included on the form is essential. To ensure consistency of recording all surveyors must be accredited, and recording follows standard protocols. Data were collected under the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project managed by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Headwater stream surveys have been carried out in 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of sites. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to headwater stream data, soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data and linear habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/40da9509-999f-4d61-85fe-59d7b32e7ca6

  • This dataset consists of landscape point feature information for points across Great Britain, surveyed in 2007. Data are presented as rows of information recorded as point features (for example individual trees, water bodies or structures), with associated species where relevant, within a set of 591 1km squares across Great Britain, surveyed during the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project (note: not all surveyed squares contained point features). The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to point features, habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/55dc5fd7-d3f7-4440-b8a7-7187f8b0550b

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for landscape linear features across Great Britain in 2007. Data are presented as lengths of different feature categories (such as fences, walls and lines of trees), with associated species attributes, from 591 km squares, surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project (note: not all surveyed squares contained linear features). The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e1d31245-4c0a-4dee-b36c-b23f1a697f88