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UK Location (INSPIRE)

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  • Miscellaneous geological records for Scotland and Northern England of current or semi-current interest filed in order of accession. Some 65 accessions held which will be subject to review for permanent retention/destruction. Dataset created c.1970 and Indexed on Land Survey Record Index Database.

  • Index to manuscript geological maps produced by the Survey geologists or other recognised geologists on County Series (1:10560) and National Grid (1:10560 & 1:10000) Ordnance Survey base maps. The index was set up in 1991. Current holdings for Great Britain are over 35,000. There are entries for all registered maps but the level of detail depends on nature of original Survey, ie not all fields are complete for all entries.

  • The BGS Debris Flow Susceptibility Model for Great Britain v6.1 is a 1:50 000 scale raster dataset of Great Britain providing 50 m ground resolution information on the potential of the ground, at a given location, to form a debris flow. It is based on a combination of geological, hydrogeological and geomorphological data inputs and is primarily concerned with potential ground stability related to natural (rather than man-made) geological conditions and slopes. The dataset is designed for those interested specifically in debris flow susceptibility at a regional or national planning scale such as those involved in construction or maintenance of infrastructure networks (road or rail or utilities), or other asset managers such as for property (including developers and home owners), loss adjusters, surveyors or local government. The dataset builds on research BGS has conducted over the past 15 years investigating debris flows. The model was designed to identify potential source-areas for debris flows rather than locate where material may be deposited following a long-run-out failure i.e. the track and flow of debris. This work focuses on natural geological and geomorphological controls that are likely to influence the initiation of debris flows. It therefore, does not consider the influence of land use or land cover factors.

  • The BGS Permeability data product shows estimated rates of water movement from the ground surface to the water table. BGS Permeability version 8 incorporates the latest geology mapping (BGS Geology 50k). This includes updates to the lithology-coding schema, the LEX_RCS. A 2-part code used to identify the named rock unit from the BGS lexicon of named rock units (LEX) followed by a Rock Classification Scheme (RCS) code which describes the rocks lithological characteristics e.g. texture and composition. Updates to these codes and latest dissolution hazard data sourced from BGS GeoSure: Soluble Rocks have been reviewed and classified as part of the version 8 release. The product covers Great Britain and is presented at a scale of 1:50 000, based on the geological data at the same scale. However, in areas where the geology is not mapped to this scale, the next best available scale is used. The BGS Permeability data product can be used to compare the relative permeability of deposits at the regional scale, indicating where highly permeable rocks could allow rapid infiltration to occur, or where less permeable rocks are present and water could pond on the ground surface. The dataset can be used as a component in a wide range of geo-environmental assessments such as natural flood management, Sustainable Drainage Systems, engineering desk studies, slope stability, and aquifer vulnerability. It is for use at the regional scale and is not recommended for use at the site-specific scale.

  • A list of the laboratory reports produced from testing in the engineering geology laboratory. It includes report number, title and author's name(s). The reports themselves contain data on a wide range of geotechnical and geophysical laboratory tests, from standard and index tests to complex research. Test materials are highly varied, soils and rock, from the UK or overseas.

  • **This dataset has been superseded** The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings. This data is available as vector data, 25m gridded data or alternatively linked to a postcode database – the Derived Postcode Database. A series of GIS (Geographical Information System) maps show the most significant hazard areas. The ground movement, or subsidence, hazards included are landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground and collapsible deposits. The newGeoSure Insurance Product uses the individual GeoSure data layers and evaluates them using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The Derived Postcode Database (DPD) contains generalised information at a postcode level. The DPD is designed to provide a ‘summary’ value representing the combined effects of the GeoSure dataset across a postcode sector area. It is available as a GIS point dataset or a text (.txt) file format. The DPD contains a normalised hazard rating for each of the 6 GeoSure themes hazards (i.e. each GeoSure theme has been balanced against each other) and a combined unified hazard rating for each postcode in Great Britain. The combined hazard rating for each postcode is available as a standalone product. The Derived Postcode Database is available in a point data format or text file format. It is available in a range of GIS formats including ArcGIS (*.shp), ArcInfo Coverages and MapInfo (*.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset has been created as vector data but is also available as a raster grid. This data is available in a range of GIS formats, including ArcGIS (*.shp), ArcInfo coverage’s and MapInfo (*.tab). More specialised formats may be available but may incur additional processing costs. Data for the newGIP is provided for national coverage across Great Britain. The newGeoSure Insurance Product dataset is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale providing 50 m ground resolution. This dataset has been specifically developed for the insurance of low-rise buildings. The GeoSure datasets have been developed to identify the potential hazard for low-rise buildings and those with shallow foundations of less than 2 m deep. The identification of ground instability and other geological hazards can assist regional planners; rapidly identifying areas with potential problems and aid local government offices in making development plans by helping to define land suited to different uses. Other users of these data may include developers, homeowners, solicitors, loss adjusters, the insurance industry, architects and surveyors. Version 7 released June 2015.

  • This national dataset brings together sixteen national datasets to create a GIS product that provides the information necessary to determine the extent to which the ground is suitable for infiltration sustainable drainage systems (SuDS). It includes derivations of the following datasets: soluble rocks, landslide hazards, groundwater flooding susceptibility, made ground, shallow mining hazards, geological indicators of flooding, depth to water table, superficial thickness, compressible ground, collapsible ground, swelling clays, running sands, predominant flow mechanism, permeability indices and the Environment Agencys source protection zone dataset. All datasets have been reclassified and reattributed (with text descriptions and a score field indicating the suitability of the ground for infiltration) and feature in the end product both as single entities, but also in derived 'screening' maps that combine numerous datasets.

  • In 2011 the British Geological Survey (BGS) decided to begin the assembly of a National Geological Model (NGM) from its existing and on-going geological framework models , comprising integrated national crustal, bedrock and Quaternary models. The bedrock component is the most advanced of these themes and comprises both the calculated models and a complementary network of cross-sections that provide a fence diagram for the bedrock geology of Great Britain. This fence diagram, the GB3D_v2014 dataset is available in a variety of formats from the BGS website www.bgs.ac.uk as free downloads, it supercedes the earlier 2012 version. The model complements the existing 1:625 000 scale mapsheets published by BGS utilising the same colour schema and geological classification. The component cross-sections extend to depths between 1.5 and 6 km; they have an aggregate length of over 25,000 km, and they are snapped together at their intersections to ensure total consistency. The sections are based on the existing BGS geological framework models where they cut through them together and incorporate around 300 deep stratigraphic boreholes across England and Wales. The sections also take account of the vast wealth of published data on the subsurface structure of Britain both from BGS and in the scientific literature. Much of this is in the form of cross-sections, contour maps of surfaces, and thicknesses (isopachs). The fence diagram has been built in the Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3D (GSI3D) software. It is envisaged that this dataset will form a useful educational resource for geoscience students and the general public, and also provide the bedrock geology context and structure for regional and catchment scale studies. The fence diagram has been built in stages between 2009-14 using funding from the BGS National Capability Programme the Environment Agency of England and Wales, and the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. Some 16 expert regional geologists compiled the sections.

  • The joint PHE-GSNI-BGS digital Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Northern Ireland. The Radon Potential map for Northern Ireland shows the estimated percentage of homes in an area exceeding the radon Action Level. This is the basic information to assigning the level of protection required for new buildings and extensions, as described in the Building Research Establishment guidance BR-413 Radon: Guidance on protective measures for new dwellings in Northern Ireland (2004). The Radon Potential map for Northern Ireland is based on PHE indoor radon measurements and 1:10 000 or 1: 250 000 scale digital geology information provided by the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland (GSNI). The indoor radon data is used with the agreement of the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and PHE. Confidentiality of measurement locations is maintained through data management practices. Access to the data is restricted. Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. Public Health England (PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average exceed 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3), the Action Level. PHE defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration at or above the Action Level. Further information on radon can be obtained from www.ukradon.org

  • The joint PHE-GSNI-BGS digital Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland presents an overview of the results of detailed mapping of radon potential, defined as the estimated percentage of homes in an area above the radon Action Level. The Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland presents a simplified version of the Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland, with each 1-km grid square being classed according to the highest radon potential found within it, so is indicative rather than definitive. The Radon Potential Dataset for Northern Ireland provides the current definitive map of radon Affected Areas in Northern Ireland. The Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland is published in Z Daraktchieva, J D Appleton, D M Rees, K A M Adlam, A H Myers, S A Hodgson, N P McColl, G R Wasson and L J Peake, 2015. Indicative Atlas of Radon in Northern Ireland. PHE-CRCE-017, 22 pp. Radon is a natural radioactive gas, which enters buildings from the ground. Exposure to high concentrations increases the risk of lung cancer. Public Health England (PHE) recommends that radon levels should be reduced in homes where the annual average exceed 200 becquerels per cubic metre (200 Bq m-3), the radon Action Level. Public Health England defines radon Affected Areas as those with 1% chance or more of a house having a radon concentration exceeding the Action Level.