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  • Collated indices are a relative measure of butterfly abundance across monitored sites in the UK, calculated from data collected by the UK Butterfly Monitoring Scheme (UKBMS). Collated indices are calculated annually for each individual butterfly species that has been recorded on five or more sites in that year. Based on this criterion collated indices have been calculated for the entire UKBMS time series from 1976 to the current year for the majority of species. For some rarer species the time series starts in a later year due to lack of data. Collated indices are calculated using a statistical model that accounts for missing data. The number of sites for each species ranges from 5 to several hundred and varies from year to year. Since 2008 more than 1,000 sites have been monitored across the UK each year. Collated indices are calculated so that we can determine how butterfly populations are changing over time across the UK. This data can be used, for example, to determine where to target conservation efforts and to measure the condition of the UK countryside. Butterflies are recognised as important indicators of biodiversity and environmental change (e.g. as official UK Biodiversity Indicators), and have been used in numerous research studies to understand the impacts of changes in climate and the extent and condition of habitats. Although the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) and Butterfly Conservation (BC) are responsible for the calculation and interpretation of the Collated indices, the collection of the data used in their creation is ultimately reliant on a large volunteer community. The UKBMS is funded by a consortium of organisations led by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). This dataset is updated annually and more recent versions of the UKBMS collated indices are available. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/31f301f5-5374-45c5-8db5-37ea43422b8d

  • This dataset contains greenhouse gas flux data and vegetation survey data from an experiment based at Parsonage Down, UK. The vegetation survey comprises total species percentage cover and species richness data from four 50 cm by 50 cm quadrats. The greenhouse gas flux data comprises net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange, photosynthesis and respiration data measured with an Infra-red Gas Analyser (IRGA); methane, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide data measured using gas chromatography; and nitrate and ammonium from soil samples extracted with potassium chloride. The experiment investigated the effect of different plant groups on soil carbon stores and nutrient cycling, by using a mixture of hand weeding and herbicide spot spraying to create different plant communities on the species rich grassland at Parsonage Down. The resulting carbon and nutrient cycling rates were compared to the characteristics of the plant groups. The experiment ran from 2013 to 2015 and this dataset contains data from 2014 only. This experiment was part of the Wessex BESS project, a six-year (2011-2017) project aimed at understanding how biodiversity underpins the ecosystem functions and services that landscapes provide. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e05b350f-3cf4-4f8d-aa3c-24d562ca756b

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset contains vegetation survey data from an upland heath site in the Clocaenog Forest. Vegetation was surveyed in the experimental plots at the Climoor site in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. The vegetation at the site is a typical UK upland heathland, dominated by Calluna vulgaris, with Vaccinium myrtillus and Empetrum nigrum also being present in the vegetation understory. In each year, measurements were taken at a time period of maximum growth, which was late August/early September. This was done by pin point methodology, and data includes both pin hits as well as measurements converted into plant biomass. Individual species can be examined, as well as the different components of the higher plants (i.e. leaf, stem, flower). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/143e1a69-d4d7-4ae0-9650-6ffad9fd75b2

  • The dataset comprises hourly water temperature data of an experimental mesocosm facility as well as air temperatures from beginning of July to end of September 2022. The experiment aimed to investigate the effect of different nutrient regimes on Taste and Odour issues. Mesocosms were filled with reservoir water and water temperature was measured by platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) shaded by a plastic cover, sited around mid-depth, radially offset by 30 cm from the mesocosm's side wall and logged by a Campbell Scientific Data Logger. Air temperature was measured at a weather station within the mesocosm compound (Vaisala weather transmitter WXT520) at around 2.7m height. Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2858a0e9-9b20-4c2c-892c-4a99fe49e315

  • The dataset consists of pH, Loss on ignition (Soil organic matter) measurements and soil group information taken from soil samples from plots in 103 woodland sites surveyed across Great Britain in 1971 and again over the growing seasons of 2000, 2002 and 2003 (referred to as '2001 survey'), using exactly the same field methods. Data were collected under projects managed by The Nature Conservancy (in 1971) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (in 2001). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/fb1e474d-456b-42a9-9a10-a02c35af10d2

  • The dataset includes lists of local tree names, tree species identification and local uses of trees in seventeen different villages across three Districts in Mozambique, Africa. We collated species lists from seven villages in Mabalane District, Gaza Province, ten villages in Marrupa District, Niassa Province, and ten villages in Gurue District Zambezia Province. Data were collected in Mabalane between May-Sep 2014, Marrupa between May-Aug 2015, and Gurue between Sep-Dec 2015. Lists of local tree names were collated from several forest plots and agricultural field surveys occurring within the sampled villages, and their species identified in the field by the authors and/or from dried and pressed samples by botanists at the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane in Maputo. Tree species uses by local populations were recorded through a mixture of key informant interviews, focus group discussions, village surveys and ad-hoc observations. This dataset was collected as part of the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) funded ACES project , which aims to understand how changing land use impacts on ecosystem services and human wellbeing of the rural poor in Mozambique. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/52371ef0-855f-40c8-8567-f8965f9cbf03

  • The data comprises of dimensions of large wood pieces and the isotope composition (radiocarbon, stable carbon isotopes) of cellulose extracted from the wood samples. Large Wood (LW) samples were collected from the Mackenzie River delta region, Northwest Territories, Canada, in August 2019 and were analysed at the National Environmental Isotope Facility, UK. The scientific aims were to help constrain the source and age of wood carried by this large river system draining to the Arctic Ocean. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/19be1a45-c457-40af-a582-395257d7a3b0

  • This dataset contains root length, biomass and fungal colonisation data for Calluna vulgaris from control, drought and warming treated soils from the long term climate change experiment in Clocaenog forest. Soil samples were collected from the climate change experiment in Northeast Wales during April 2015. Roots were separated from the soil, their length and biomass measured and then analysed using microscopy for Ericoid mycorrhizae (ErM) and dark septate endophyte (DSE) colonisation of Calluna vulgaris. The experimental field site consists of three untreated control plots, three plots where the plant canopy air is artificially warmed during night time hours and three plots where rainfall is excluded from the plots at least during the plants growing season (March to September). The Climoor field experiment intends to answer questions regarding the effects of warming and drought on ecosystem processes and has been running since 1999. The root length and fungal colonisation data aims to understand how changes in soil hydrological and chemical properties have influenced Calluna vulgaris rooting behaviour and interactions with the soil microbiome. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3d468857-f5d0-4dc4-88f3-6be6df19608b

  • The dataset details organic carbon content of sediments across 6 intertidal sites in the winter and summer of 2013. The data provide a quantitative measure of the organic carbon present within surface sediments (up to a depth of 2 cm). Three sites were located in Essex, South East England and the other 3 in Morecambe Bay, North West England. Each site consisted of a saltmarsh habitat and adjacent mudflat habitat. 22 sampling quadrats were placed in each habitat covering 4 spatial scales. 3 replicate samples of surface sediment were collected at each quadrat. They were then processed for organic carbon content using the Loss on Ignition method (detailed below) Values are expressed as a percentage of the total sample collected. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS): NE/J015644/1. The project was funded with support from the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. BESS is a six-year programme (2011-2017) funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) as part of the UK's Living with Environmental Change (LWEC) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d4e9f0f7-637a-4aa4-b9df-2a4ca5bfaded

  • This data set comprises two years of data (2016 and 2017) from one trial (Hucking, Kent, UK) and one year (2017) from a second trial (Hartshorne, Derbyshire, UK). Data was collected on tree traits (tree height, shoot length, tree provenance), abundance of foliar insect herbivores (gallers, leaf manipulators and leaf miners) and leaf damage by oak powdery mildew, a foliar fungal pathogen. Data was collected from plots differing in tree diversity (provenance and species diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/cbccb101-c877-4e43-ac70-e8a852b51f07