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  • This dataset consists of landscape point feature information for points across Great Britain, surveyed in 1984. Data are presented as rows of information recorded as point features (for example individual trees, water bodies or structures), with associated vegetation species where relevant, within a set of 382 1km squares across Great Britain, surveyed during the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project (note: not all surveyed squares contained point features). The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to point features, habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/124b872e-036e-4dd3-8316-476b5f42c16e

  • This dataset consists of stock (length) data for landscape linear features across Great Britain in 1984. Data are presented as lengths of different feature categories (such as fences, walls and lines of trees), with associated species attributes, from 382 km squares, surveyed for the Countryside Survey long term monitoring project (note: not all surveyed squares contained linear features). The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside, carried out by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to linear features, habitat areas, vegetation species plot, soil plot, freshwater habitat and satellite map data are also produced by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a3f5665c-94b2-4c46-909e-a98be97857e5

  • The Land Survey Plans collection of c.1,520 plans consists largely of mine plans acquired by the Survey, including 492 non-coal mine plans deposited by the National Coal Board 1984-87, and copies of mine plans derived from various sources including '6-inch reductions'. The collection also contains about 500 miscellaneous plans extracted from other Land Survey records in order to benefit from specialised systems of archival storage. The Survey's collection of Northern England mine plans are being added to the LSP collection. The collection supplements the Plans Of Abandoned Mines (Other than Coal & Oil Shale) in Scotland (NONCOALPLANSCO) providing an index to plans other than coal and oil shale for Scotland. Indexed on BGS Plans Database Index. Coal Authority hold some non-coal plans for Scotland. All non-confidential data held by NGRC(N) is available to users. Mainly coalfield areas of Central Scotland.

  • The database contains a range of geochemical data for metamorphosed limestones from the Dalradian of Scotland and Northern Ireland. The data include a) whole-rock geochemical analyses by XRF (X-Ray Fluorescence) for major oxides and a range of trace elements for several hundred samples, b) a number of whole-carbonate O (oxygen) and C (carbon) stable isotope and Sr (strontium) data, c) electron microprobe mineral data on carbonates and calc-silicate minerals and d) ion-probe O stable isotope and mineral trace element data for calcites in a small number of samples. The samples from which the data have been derived were collected from a wide range of outcrops within the Scottish and Irish Dalradian, mainly concentrated in the North East Grampian Highlands of Scotland. The data have been collected mainly to support the mapping and scientific work being undertaken in the Grampian Highlands by BGS since the early 1980s. The database includes some data from the literature. All samples are located by British National Grid coordinates to the nearest 10m or better. The isotope data were acquired as part of a PhD study by C W Thomas in the late 1990s. The database is not currently being added to, but is still being used in various studies. The combined data provide wide-ranging insights into marine chemistry contemporary with deposition of the limestones and the way in which this chemistry changed with time during the Neoproterozoic, and they elucidate subsequent effects of diagenesis and metamorphism and the outcrop and grain-scale. The data set is largely complete with regard to geochemical data, but still requires some editing to bring all fields up to date, particularly with regard to lithostratigraphical assignation. The data are currently held in MS Access tables and can conveniently be displayed via GIS or abstracted in tabular form and used in spreadsheets, statistical analysis and graphing software.

  • This dataset consists of stock (area) data for landscape features across Great Britain in 1984. Data are presented as areas of Broad (or Priority) Habitats, with associated landscape attributes (such as plant species and land use), within a set of 379 1km squares across Great Britain. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b656bb43-448d-4b2c-aade-7993aa243ea3