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Soil

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  • This web map service presents modelled estimates of soil pH, carbon concentration (g kg-1), nitrogen concentration (% dry weight soil) and invertebrate density (individuals m-2) at 1km2 resolution across Great Britain. A Generalized Additive Model approach was used with Countryside Survey soil data from 2007 and including climate, atmospheric deposition, habitat, soil and spatial predictors. The models are based on data from Countryside Survey sample locations across Great Britain and are representative of 0-8cm soil depth for invertebrates and 0-15 cm soil depth for other variables. The Countryside Survey looks at a range of physical, chemical and biological properties of the topsoil from a representative sample of habitats across the UK. Loss-on-ignition (LOI) was determined by combustion of 10g dry soil at 375 degrees Celsius for 16 hours; carbon concentration was estimated by multiplying LOI by a factor of 0.55. Soil N concentration was determined using a total elemental analyser. Soil pH was measured using 10g of field moist soil with 25ml de-ionised water giving a ratio of soil to water of 1:2.5 by weight. Soil invertebrates were extracted from cores using a dry Tullgren extraction method and enumerated by microscope

  • Map service of soil types, geology and vegetation in the Moor House region of the Moor House - Upper Teesdale National Nature Reserve. The site lies in the North Pennine uplands of England and has an area of 74 km2. It is England's highest and largest terrestrial National Nature Reserve (NNR), a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and a European Special Protection Area. Habitats include exposed summits, extensive blanket peatlands, upland grasslands, pastures, hay meadows and deciduous woodland. Altitude ranges from 290 to 850 m. Moor House - Upper Teesdale is part of the Environmental Change Network (ECN) which is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme.

  • This web map service (WMS) depicts estimates of mean values of soil bacteria, invertebrates, carbon, nutrients and pH within selected habitats and parent material characteristics across GB . Estimates were made using CS data using a mixed model approach. The estimated means of habitat/parent material combinations using 2007 data are modelled on dominant habitat and parent material characteristics derived from the Land Cover Map 2007 and Parent Material Model 2009, respectively. Bacteria data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth and includes bacterial community structure as assessed by ordination scores. Invertebrate data is representative of 0 - 8 cm soil depth and includes Total catch, Mite:Springtail ratio, Number of broad taxa and Shannon diversity. Gravimetric moisture content (%) data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth Carbon data is representative of 0-15 cm soil depth and includes Loss-on-ignition (%), Carbon concentration (g kg-1) and Carbon density (t ha-1). Loss-on-ignition was determined by combustion of 10g dry soil at 375 deg C for 16 hours; carbon concentration was estimated by multiplying LOI by a factor of 0.55, and carbon density was estimated by combining carbon concentration with bulk density estimates. Nutrient data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth and includes total nitrogen (N) concentration (%), C:N ratio and Olsen-Phosphorus (mg/kg). pH and bulk density (g cm-3) data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth. Topsoil pH was measured using 10g of field moist soil with 25ml de-ionised water giving a ratio of soil to water of 1:2.5 by weight; bulk density was estimated by making detailed weight measurements throughout the soil processing procedure. Areas, such as urban and littoral rock, are not sampled by CS and therefore have no associated data. Also, in some circumstances sample sizes for particular habitat/parent material combinations were insufficient to estimate mean values.

  • This dataset consists of soil physico-chemical properties (pH, loss on ignition, carbon stock and concentration, total nitrogen, Olsen phosphorus) from soils sampled across Great Britain in 1998. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Please note: the use of Olsen P data, particularly in relation to acidic soils, is controversial. Please ensure these data are suitable for your requirements and exercise caution in their use. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9d1eada2-3f8b-4a7b-a9b0-a7a04d05ff72

  • Data comprise bracken biomass, soil and bracken chemistry (for example mass, bulk density, pH, carbon, nitrogen and the concentration of a range of other elements) precipitation, percentage ground cover of plant species and site information. Samples were collected between 21st July and 6th August 2014 at 49 plots in the English lake district and Snowdonia in Wales. Plots were located in stands with minimum 80% bracken cover and which had not been trampled by grazing animals. The study was funded by the UK Natural Environment Research Council under the Macronutrient Cycling Research Programme, as part of the Long-Term, Large-Scale (LTLS) project (Grant no. NE/J011533/1), and by the University of Liverpool (Grant no. NE/J011630/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5b89d8f3-86f0-431c-844f-eda5ddae9042

  • This is a digital soil map of the Moor House - Upper Teesdale National Nature Reserve. Mapped polygons represent a range of soil types. The site lies in the North Pennine uplands of England and has an area of 74 km2. It is England's highest and largest terrestrial National Nature Reserve (NNR), a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and a European Special Protection Area. Habitats include exposed summits, extensive blanket peatlands, upland grasslands, pastures, hay meadows and deciduous woodland. Altitude ranges from 290 to 850 m. Moor House - Upper Teesdale is part of the Environmental Change Network (ECN) whcih is the UK's long-term environmental monitoring programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b36357bd-988c-41fa-a3a8-3b21cef5f0b6

  • The dataset contains peat core data from 7 sites in a 1km2 upland (RSPB Forsinard Knockfin Heights) and 7 sites in a 1km2 of lowland (Plantlife Munsary) blanket peatland within the Flow Country, Caithness and Sutherland. Data was obtained between October 2018 and January 2019. Also included is peat depth data from Knockfin Heights at 100m spacing and Teabag Index data to assess peat decomposition rates at 47 points. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3458e0b9-5002-4ddb-bcb3-1c7fb08fb70b

  • These measurements of soil microbial biomass carbon, soil basal respiration rate and metabolic quotient were taken from an experiment set up at the University of Sheffield, using soil from the NERC Soil Biodiversity site at Sourhope. The work was part of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme, which was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders. During the experiment, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e300da0a-e0db-42b3-8986-56efef2985c2

  • This dataset includes relative surface soil moisture across the Thames Valley, between October 2015 and September 2021, using backscatter radar data collected using the ESA Sentinel-1 Constellation. Radar backscatter was normalised to 40 incidence angle, using a novel monthly normalisation parameterisation. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b23d63d1-dcc5-4c49-a6b5-67154f3739b7

  • These datasets were used for a study investigating the prevalence of diurnal variability of soil nitrous oxide (N¬2O) emissions. The datasets contain 286 diurnal N¬2O flux datasets and 160 diurnal soil temperature datasets, which were extracted from 46 published journal articles that were selected from a literature search and passed through a set of eligibility criteria. The datasets also include processed diurnal N¬2O flux data, which were used to classify the diurnal N¬2O pattern of the datasets. Data of non-diurnal factors from the literature including soil pH, bulk density, soil texture, season of measurement, soil water-filled pore space, irrigation and grazing are also included in the datasets. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/94e37080-4383-4f6e-b14a-04ac2ac79bf0