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  • This dataset consists of a variety of hydrographic, biogeochemical and meteorological data. Hydrographic profiles, towed and underway measurements and point sources provided information on free-fall turbulence data, current velocities and acoustic backscatter, water column structure including temperature and salinity, the underwater light field, fluorescence and dissolved oxygen. A comprehensive biogeochemical water sampling programme provided details on nutrients, primary productivity, dissolved organic matter and phytoplankton pigments. Biological samples such as zooplankton were obtained from the water column using nets, and from the sea-bed using grabs. Bathymetry and meteorological parameters were measured across the study area. A dye release experiment was also carried out. Data collection was undertaken in the Celtic Sea. The data were collected during the period 02 - 27 July 2008 during RRS James Cook cruise JC025. Measurements were taken using a variety of instrumentation, including conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profilers with attached auxiliary sensors, bathymetric echosounders, water bottle samplers, nets, acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs), remote access water samplers, towed undulators, free-fall turbulence profilers, temperature loggers, fluorometers, grabs and ship flow-through and meteorological packages. The data have been collected as part of the United Kingdom (UK) Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Oceans 2025 programme (Work Package 3.2) to provide information on vertical mixing processes at the thermocline. This will help improve modelling of these processes and is an expansion of work carried out during a previous National Oceanography Centre Liverpool (NOCL) project ‘Physical-Biological Control of New Production within the Seasonal Thermocline’. The cruise was undertaken jointly by NOCL, the Scottish Association for Marine Sciences (SAMS), the University of Aberdeen, the University of Strathclyde, Napier University and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC). The Principal Scientist during the research cruise was Professor Jonathan Sharples of NOCL, who is also the Principal Investigator of Work Package 3.2. CTD data, towed undulator data, temperature logger data, nutrient data, ADCP data, dye tracking data, zooplankton data, primary productivity data and ship underway monitoring system data from this cruise are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre. Other data have not yet been supplied.

  • The World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) sea level data set comprises data collected from approximately 160 tide gauge sites distributed around the world. The data are usually hourly heights of sea surface elevation, although some were collected and supplied at higher frequencies (i.e. 6 or 15 minute intervals) or as pressure values rather than elevations. The data are primarily from 1990 to 1998 (the WOCE period), but the dataset also includes historical data as a number of the tide gauges had been operating for many years. The total volume of data held is 3550 site years. A few sites have data extending back over 50 years and many over 20 years. The British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) was responsible, as a WOCE Data Assembly Centre (DAC), for assembling, quality controlling and disseminating this comprehensive sea level data set. Data were supplied by Argentina, Australia, Canada, Chile, China, Cuba, Denmark, Ecuador, France, Iceland, Japan, New Zealand, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Ukraine, the UK and the USA. Data quality control was carried out with the aid of sophisticated screening software which allows rapid inspection of the data. The sea level data were tidally analyzed and the residuals inspected. Parameters other than sea level, for example atmospheric pressure and sea surface temperature, were also visually inspected. This quality control identified spikes and gaps in the data in addition to timing problems and datum shifts. Any problems identified were resolved with the data supplier. Qualifying information accompanying the data was also checked and data documentation assembled. The data can be downloaded from the BODC web site, or made available on CD-ROM.

  • This dataset comprises hydrographic sections, together with measurements collected by ocean gliders and moored instrumentation deployed during the UK Overturning In the Subpolar North Atlantic Programme (UK-OSNAP). UK-OSNAP is the UK contribution to the International OSNAP Programme. The dataset also includes modelling output informed by the observations. OSNAP observations are focused on two lines: i) OSNAP West, extending from south Labrador to southwest Greenland and ii) OSNAP East from southeast Greenland to Scotland. Data collection commenced June 2014 and is ongoing. UK_OSNAP consists of cruises JR302, PE399, DY053, DY054, two alternating glider deployments, current meter moorings (five at Cape Farewell and three in the Rockall trough) and ADCPs in the Rockall Trough Shelf Edge Current. The model data addresses the Subpolar Gyre circulation and fluxes using data assimilation and theoretical analysis. The datasets assembled as part of UK-OSNAP provide a continuous record of full-depth, trans-basin mass, heat, and freshwater fluxes in the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre. These, coupled with the associated modelling exercises help improve the understanding of the circulation and fluxes of the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre. UK-OSNAP, funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) is led by the National Oceanography Centre (NOC). UK-OSNAP is a partnership between NOC, Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS), University of Oxford and the University of Liverpool. It is part of international OSNAP that is led by USA and includes 10 further partner groups in Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands and China. Investigators: National Oceanography Centre (NOC): Dr Penny Holliday, Dr Sheldon Bacon, Dr Chris Wilson, Neill Mackay. Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS): Dr Stuart Cunningham, Prof Mark Inall, Loic Houpert. University of Oxford: Prof David Marshall, Dr Helen Johnson. University of Liverpool: Prof Ric Williams, Dr Vassil Roussenov. The full dataset is still being assembled and currently consists of near real time glider measurements made (to date) on the project, the mooring dataset and cruise data. NERC have added a 2-year extension to UK-OSNAP, until October 2020. This covers a 2-year deployment of 3 moorings in the Iceland Basin as partof the international OSNAP programme. The moorings will be recovered in 2020.

  • Macrofauna and polychaete species abundance data were obtained from replicate megacore samples collected from inside the Whittard Canyon (N.E. Atlantic) and the adjacent slope to the west of the canyon during cruise JC036 in June and July 2009. Four sites were sampled, three in the Whittard Canyon branches (Western, Central and Eastern) and one site on the slope to the west of the canyon. Five deployments were conducted in the Western branch, six in the Central and Eastern branches and five at the slope site. One extra deployment was made in the Central and Eastern branches to compensate for the failure to recover sufficient cores. All sites were located at 3500 m depth. Samples were collected using a Megacorer fitted with eight large (100 mm internal diameter) core tubes. Core slices from the same sediment layer from one deployment were pooled to make one replicate sample. The number of cores pooled per deployment ranged from 3 to 7 and the area of seabed sampled varied accordingly. The top three sediment horizons (i.e. 0–1, 1–3 and 3–5 cm), were analysed in toto. Macrofauna were identified to higher taxa levels, and polychaetes to species level and counts of species/taxa recorded for each site. AphiaIDs have been assigned to the samples - where identification was only possible to genus or family level, the aphiaIDs for genus and family have been supplied. The supplied aphaIDs are those that were acceptable at the time of the analysis and not their more recent superseding terms. This cruise was part of the HERMIONE project and the data formed the basis of L. Gunton's PhD thesis 'Deep-Sea Macrofaunal Biodiversity of the Whittard Canyon (NE Atlantic)'.

  • This dataset consists of measurements of underway meteorology, navigation and sea surface hydrography, seismic reflection and refraction, and bathythermograph data collected during a comprehensive survey of the Tonga-Kermadec island arc-deep-sea trench system, undertaken between April and June 2011. Data were collected on RV Sonne cruise SO215 by an integrated marine geophysical experiment that comprised simultaneous seismic reflection (MCS) and wide-angle (WA) refraction, gravity, magnetic, bathymetry and sub-seabed high-resolution imaging of the Louisville Ridge-Tonga-Kermadec Trench collision system. This cruise formed the field component of NERC Discovery Science project "The Louisville Ridge-Tonga Trench collision: Implications for subduction zone dynamics". The key scientific objectives for the cruise were as follows: a)Determine the 'background' crustal and uppermost mantle structure of the subducting plate; b)Determine the crustal and uppermost mantle structure across and along the Louisville Ridge; c)Determine the physical properties of the leading edges of the subducting and over-riding plates; d)Determine the state of isostasy, ridge-related flexure and moat characteristics at the Louisville Ridge, and the mechanical properties of the subducting and over-riding plates; e)Determine the seafloor morphology and collision-related deformation in the Tonga forearc. The Discovery Science project was composed of Standard Grant reference NE/F004273/1 as the lead grant with child grant NE/F005318/1. The lead grant ran from 1 Mar 2011 - 31 Aug 2016 and the child grant ran from 1 Oct 2010 - 30 Sep 2014. Professor Christine Peirce of University of Durham, Department of Earth Sciences was the principal investigator of the lead grant of this project. Prof Anthony Watts of University of Oxford, Earth Science was the principal investigator of the child grant. The bathythermograph data have been received by BODC as raw files from the RV Sonne, processed and quality controlled using in-house BODC procedures and will be made available online soon. The remaining data have been received by BODC as raw files from the RV Sonne and are available on request.

  • This dataset consists of measurements of temperature, pressure and depth collected using conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) casts, chlorophyll, water chemistry and biogenic silica data taken from CTD and underway samples, and underway meteorology, navigation and sea surface hydrography. Data were collected in the Southern Ocean, specifically the Drake Passage, Weddell Sea and Powell Basin, on the RRS James Clark Ross cruises JR255A (20th January to 03rd February 2012) and recovery cruise JR255B (04th February 22nd March 2012) Biogenic silica and chlorophyll samples were collected from the non-toxic underway and CTD Niskin bottles, filtered, dried and processed spectrophotometrically post-cruise. Similarly, water chemistry samples were collected, filtered and dried before post-cruise processing with an elemental analyser. A SeaBird CTD rosette was launched at stations throughout the cruise collecting temperature, pressure and depth values with an attached deep ocean thermometer collecting temperature data which were used to calibrate the CTD data. The underway oceanlogger was running through the duration of the cruises, excepting times for cleaning, entering and leaving port, and while alongside. The data were collected as part of the “Gliders: Excellent New Tools for Observing the Ocean (GENTOO)” project. The objectives of the GENTOO project are: (i) To quantify and understand the possible new source of dense water overflow and its variability; to determine the outflow's potential as an early indicator of Antarctic climate change; to assess the impact of changing dense overflows on the locations and strengths of the surface currents and frontal jets; to provide valuable constraints for climate models that describe how changes in ocean circulation feedback on and regulate climate change in polar latitudes. (ii) To determine the krill biomass distribution and (temporal and spatial) variability to the east of the Antarctic Peninsula and its likely impact on the circumpolar krill ecosystem; to assess the impact of any variations in the location of the frontal jets (from objective i) on the krill biomass distribution; to alleviate a severe regional lack of field data on krill, a key species in the Antarctic food web. To achieve the two objectives, our technological deliverable is a critical evaluation of our ability to measure (a) current velocity from a glider and (b) krill biomass from a glider. The data were collected under NERC lead grant NE/H01439X/1, with child grants NE/H014217/1, NE/H014756/1 and NE/H015078/1. The principal investigators were Prof. Karen Heywood,University of East Anglia, Environmental Sciences, Prof. Gwyn Griffiths, National Oceanography Centre, Science and Technology, Dr. Sophie Fielding, NERC British Antarctic Survey, Science Programmes and Dr. Stuart Bruce Dalziel, University of Cambridge, Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics, respectively. With regard the samples data (Biogenic silica, water chemistry and chlorophyll) it is important to note that these data ARE NOT the property of NERC. They belong to Walker Smith of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science(VIMS) who has supplied them in support of GENTOO. As such, he must be credited for use of the data. The CTD and underway navigation, meteorology and sea surface hydrography data have been received by BODC as raw files from the RRS James Clark Ross, are currently being processed and are available in raw format from BODC enquiries. The SBE-35 Deep Ocean Thermometer and biogenic silica, chlorophyll-a and particulate organic carbon/nitrogen samples data have been received by BODC as raw files from the RRS James Clark Ross, processed and quality controlled using in-house BODC procedures and will be made available online in the near future.

  • The data set comprises time series of non-directional surface wave spectra from moored buoys and shipborne wave recorders at fixed locations. Individual spectra comprise some 60 or so estimates of wave energy at a range of spectral frequencies, computed from 20 to 30 minute recordings of the sea surface displacement/heave. The spectra are computed at intervals ranging from 1 to 3 hours. Data holdings comprise 500 recording months of data from some 14 sites across the continental shelf areas around the British Isles and the NE Atlantic between 1976 and 1995. Observation periods at specific sites vary from 4 months to 6 years. Data from the following sites are included in the data set: Holderness offshore (53 55.9N, 000 01.4E 01; Mar 1986 - 31 Mar 1987); Holderness nearshore (53 55.7N, 000 03.5W; 01 Mar 1986 - 30 Jun 1986); West Bexington (50 38.1N, 002 42.5W; 01 Nov 1983 - 31 Mar 1985; 01 May 1985 - 26 Feb 1986; 01 May 1986 - 30 Apr 1987); West Bexington (50 36.0N, 002 39.6W; 01 Sep 1987 - 01 Apr 1988); Eddystone (50 10.0N, 004 15.0W; 01 Jan 1976 - 31 Dec 1981); Kinnairds Head (57 55.8N, 001 54.1W; 01 Feb 1980 - 30 Dec 1981); Scilly Isles (49 51.8N, 006 41.0W; 01 Apr 1979 - 31 Jul 1979; 01 Feb 1980 - 31 Dec 1982; 01 Apr 1983 - 31 Dec 1983); South Uist deep water (57 17.8N, 007 53.6W; 01 Aug 1980 - 31 Dec 1982); South Uist offshore (57 18.2N, 007 38.3W; 28 Feb 1976 - 30 Nov 1982); South Uist inshore (57 19.8N, 007 27.2W; 01 Apr 1978 - 31 Jul 1982); Channel Lightvessel( 49 54.4N, 002 53.7W; 01 Mar 1986 - 30 Jun 1987; 01 Apr 1988 - 30 Nov 1988); Dowsing Lightvessel (53 34.0N, 000 50.2E; 01 Jul 1985 - 31 Dec 1985; 01 Feb 1986 - 30 Jun 1986; 01 Sep 1986 - 30 Apr 1987; 01 Jul 1987 - 31 Dec 1987); Ocean Weather Ship Lima (57 00.0N, 020 00.0W; 01 Jan 1984 - 30 Jun 1988; 01 Aug 1988 - 31 Dec 1988); Seven Stones Lightvessel (50 03.8N, 006 04.4W; 01 Jan 1985 - 28 Feb 1986; 01 May 1986 - 31 Mar 1987; 01 May 1987 - 31 May 1987; 01 Oct 1987 - 31 Oct 1987; 01 Dec 1987 - 31 Dec 1987). The data originate almost exclusively from UK laboratories and are managed by the British Oceanographic Data Centre. Data collection is ongoing at some sites (for example, Seven Stones Lighvessel) but these data are not managed by BODC. They are part of the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) wavenet network.

  • This dataset comprises hydrographic data from conductivity and temperature sensors deployed at fixed intervals on moorings within the water column or close to the sea bed on benthic frames. The measurements were collected at five sites within the Faroe – Shetland channel during the FS Poseidon cruise PO328 between 07 and 23 September 2005. The data have been processed, quality controlled and made available by the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC). The data were collected as part of the Slope Mixing Experiment, a Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory (POL) core Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) funded project, which aimed to estimate slope mixing and its effects on waters in the overturning circulation. Detailed in situ measurements of mixing in the water column) were to be combined with fine resolution 3-D and process models. The experiment was lead by POL, in collaboration with the School of Ocean Sciences, University of Wales, Bangor; the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS); the University of Highlands and Islands and the Institute of Marine Studies (IMS) at the University of Plymouth. The Slope Mixing Experiment dataset also includes conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiles, moored Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP), vessel mounted ADCP sensors as well as 3-D and process models. These data are not available from BODC.

  • The data set comprises time series of wave height and period data from in-situ wave recorders at fixed locations. Principal parameters are significant/characteristic wave height and mean zero crossing period - usually derived from the analysis of 20 or 30 minute recordings taken at intervals of the order of 3 hours. Data holdings include over 1500 recording months of data from some 60 sites across the continental shelf areas around the British Isles and the NE Atlantic between 1954 and 1995. Recording periods vary from 2 months at some sites to over 15 years. The longer series are noted here: Channel Lightvessel (49 54.4N, 002 53.7W; 01 Sep 1979 - 31 Dec 1985); Dowsing Lightvessel (53 34.0N, 000 50.2W; 01 May 1970 - 30 Apr 1971; 01 Nov 1975 - 30 Jun 1981; 01 Jan 1982 - 31 Dec 1982; 01 Jan 1984 - 31 Dec 1984); Ocean Weather Ship Lima (57 00.0N, 020 00.0W; 01 Jan 1975 - 31 Dec 1983); Saint Gowan Lightvessel (51 30.0N, 004 59.8W; 01 Aug 1975 - 31 Jul 1976; 01 Dec 1976 - 31 Dec 1983); Seven Stones Lightvessel (50 03.8N, 006 04.4W; 31 Jan 1962 - 31 Jan 1963; 01 Jan 1968 - 31 Dec 1969; 01 Jul 1971 - 30 Jun 1974; 01 Apr 1975 - 31 Dec 1985). The data originate primarily from UK and Irish laboratories and are managed by the British Oceanographic Data Centre. Data collection is ongoing at some sites (for example, Seven Stones Lighvessel) but these data are not managed by BODC. They are part of the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) wavenet network.

  • The data set comprises time series of sea level data from coastal tide gauges. The data holdings include over 1000 site years of data from about 200 sites comprising about 10 million records. About 75 per cent of the data are from some 100 sites around the British Isles - the remaining data are from coastal sites and islands scattered across the globe. Data are primarily hourly values. Recording periods vary from one month at some sites to over several years.There are three short series from around the Irish coast which were collected in 1842.