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1 urn:ogc:def:uom:EPSG::9001

48 record(s)

 

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  • Data comprise sub-hourly discharge measurements including mean stream height, discharge and stream temperature collected at station S2 on the Siksik stream, North West Territories, Canada, between September 2009 and March 2010. Measurements were taken at a field site based at SikSik Creek a small sub-catchment of the Trail Valley Creek, approximately 60km north of Inuvik. The data were collected under Project HYDRA, a NERC funded UK research project linking Heriot Watt University, the Universities of Durham, Aberdeen and Stirling, and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh. Project HYDRA is part of the UK Arctic Research Programme. Project HYDRA studies sites in Arctic Canada to investigate the biological, chemical and physical controls on the release of greenhouse gases from permafrost into melt water and to the atmosphere and how these emissions will influence global warming. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1ee887d3-aabd-4fb7-b48e-056229a15c6f

  • This dataset includes dissolved organic radiocarbon content and dissolved organic carbon concentration data for river waters around the globe. The riverine dataset contains already published (n=1163) and new (n=101) data between the years 1962 – 2015. Soil solution data (n=139) from North American and European natural and semi-natural ecosystems are also included, which cover the period 1988 – 2008. Groundwater data containing 49 data points from boreholes in Europe and North America are also provided. Extra data including sampling dates, locations, stable isotope (13C), water quality and qualitative descriptions of the catchments are included in the dataset. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/06b219a8-b3ff-4db7-870a-4b1038ff53e2

  • These data consist of stream water chemistry for selected Welsh upland rivers. The sampling sites were located in sixty one small and medium catchments. Catchments were chosen from the Welsh Acid Water Surveys (WAWS) program (41 sites) and the Wye catchment (20 sites). Results for pH, alkalinity, conductivity and major cation and anion measurements are presented for the WAWS catchments. Results for pH, alkalinity, conductivity and major anion measurements are presented for the Wye catchment. Samples from the Wye catchment were collected in May 2012. Samples from the WAWS catchments were taken during the summer and autumn of 2012 and spring and summer of 2013. The data were collected to characterise water chemistry variation along a gradient of aquatic biodiversity associated with different environmental settings for example land-use intensify and recovery from acidification. Dr Isabelle Durance was responsible for organising the surveys, Dr Hugh Feeley was in charge of collecting and preserving the water samples. Analysis of the water samples was carried out at the Forest Research Laboratories. The work was carried out under Diversity in Upland Rivers for Ecosystem Service Sustainability (DURESS) project (Grant reference NERC NE/J014818/1). DURESS was a project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d329ca18-c3d8-49f0-b2fd-5243d76dc650

  • Data comprise pH and bulk density measurements (location (longitude, latitude), depth, bulk density) for multiple soil profiles in the SikSik catchment, North West Territories, Canada. Samples were collected along a transect in September 2014. Soil samples were taken near additional soil pits. Soil depth and sampling location (latitude and longitude) was recorded. Bulk density was determined according to Blake and Hartge (1986). pH was determined with the 1:5 soil:water suspension method (see supporting documentation). The data were collected under Project HYDRA, a NERC funded UK research project linking Heriot Watt University, the Universities of Durham, Aberdeen and Stirling, and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh. Project HYDRA is part of the UK Arctic Research Programme. Project HYDRA studies sites in Arctic Canada to investigate the biological, chemical and physical controls on the release of greenhouse gases from permafrost into melt water and to the atmosphere and how these emissions will influence global warming. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a37e6aa4-b003-49bd-9a16-619a7d0dd714

  • The data comprise measurements of the ‘soluble’, ‘chemically exchangeable’ and ‘isotopically exchangeable’ U concentrations in a diverse set of soils following experimental addition of UO22+ and incubation in the laboratory under controlled temperature conditions for ca. 1.7 years. The long term behaviour of U in aerobic soils was studied by conducting a laboratory-based experiment in which a set of 20 topsoils from central England with contrasting properties (e.g. pH, organic matter content, land use) were contaminated with a solution containing UO22+ in soluble form and incubated in the dark, in a moist but aerobic condition, at a temperature of 10oC for 619 days. The transformations of U in each soil microcosm were periodically monitored by means of soil extractions conducted on subsamples of incubated soils. The resulting dataset enabled quantification of the kinetics of UO22+ transformations in aerobic soils and the relationships with soil properties and land uses (arable, grassland and moorland/woodland). The dataset will be useful in developing models of long-term U bioavailability in aerobic soils under temperate conditions. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0d8b2aea-574c-4cff-a8bd-17115a0b90fc

  • [This dataset is embargoed until December 15, 2020]. The dataset includes information on antibiotic-resistance and resistance genes in bacteria (Escherichia coli) from humans, poultry and the environment in rural households, poultry farms and urban food markets. The rural households and poultry farms (broiler chickens) were located in Mirzapur, Tangail district; and urban food markets were located in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Environmental samples were collected from surface water, water supply, wastewater, soil, animal faeces (poultry and cattle) and solid waste between February 2017 and October 2018 . DNA samples from antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in all samples were analysed for quantitative assessment of two resistance genes. Trained staff from the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) undertook sample collection and laboratory analysis. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence and abundance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and associated genes among humans, poultry and environmental compartments in Bangladesh. The survey was part of a wider research project, Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Antimicrobial Resistance Transmission from the Outdoor Environment to Humans in Urban and Rural Bangladesh. The research was funded by NERC/BBSRC/MRC on behalf of the Antimicrobial Resistance Cross-Council Initiative award NE/N019555/1. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0239cdaf-deab-4151-8f68-715063eaea45

  • This dataset contains calculated breeding success rates for six seabird species from representative colonies on the Isle of May, off the East coast of Scotland. Annual breeding success has been measured as the number of chicks fledged per active nest for the Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica, since 1982), common guillemot (Uria aalge, since 1982), razorbill (Alca torda, since 1982), European shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis, since 1987), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla, since 1987) and northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis, since 1987). The number of active nests recorded are also provided. Data were collected as part of the Isle of May long-term study (IMLOTS), which aims to identify the impact of environmental change on seabirds and their associated ecosystems. This monitoring has been ongoing since 1974, by essentially the same team of scientists, using the same well-documented methods throughout this time. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/02c98a4f-8e20-4c48-8167-1cd5044c4afe

  • This dataset contains calculated return rates for five seabird species from representative colonies on the Isle of May, off the East coast of Scotland. Annual return rates are measured as the number of individually colour marked individuals seen in any one year that were also observed in the previous year for the Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica), common guillemot (Uria aalge), razorbill (Alca torda), European shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis) and black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla). Not every individual is seen in any one year and the data set does not take into account those missed in any previous years hence these data are not to be treated as survival estimates. The Isle of May long-term study (IMLOTS) aims to identify the impact of environmental change on seabirds and their associated ecosystems. Understanding the mechanisms underlying variation in seabird population size requires a thorough knowledge of demographic parameters, namely birth rates, death rates, immigration and emigration. The effects of environmental change are likely to be different according to which demographic parameter or life history stage is being considered. This complexity means that only long-term monitoring, such as that carried out on the Isle of May, will allow us to understand the functioning of bird populations and their responses to environmental change. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/53251b3c-6c79-4aeb-a0de-fc63b9350cc1

  • The data consist of observations of cover of plant species in permanent quadrats in a nitrogen deposition experiment on a peat bog. The experiment was located at Whim Moss in central Scotland, between 2002 and 2016. Recording of cover was by visual assessment in 40 x 40 cm quadrats. The experiment was designed to look at the change in vegetation composition with different rates of deposition of nitrogen in different forms (ammonia, ammonium, and nitrate). This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/65ecd65f-e518-4cf5-85bf-7d93e66fdb96

  • This dataset is a model output from the JULES land surface model driven with the Watch Forcing Data methodology applied to Era-Interim (WFDEI) data. It provides monthly global methane emissions from natural wetlands on 0.5 x 0.5 degree grid between 1980-2014. It includes the following variables: - fch4_wetl: modelled methane flux from natural wetland, in mg CH4 m-2 day-1 - fwetl: fraction of wetland - cs: soil carbon in each of these four soil carbon pools: decomposable plant material, resistant plant material, microbial biomass and humus), in kg m-2 - t_soil: sub-surface temperature of the four modelled soil layers (0-0.1 m, 0.1-0.35 m, 0.35-1.0 m and 1.0-2.0 m), in K Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6ce61e91-6912-4fe2-a095-12136af86347