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1 urn:ogc:def:uom:EPSG::9001

59 record(s)

 

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  • Data comprise sub-hourly discharge measurements including mean stream height, discharge and stream temperature collected at station S2 on the Siksik stream, North West Territories, Canada, between September 2009 and March 2010. Measurements were taken at a field site based at SikSik Creek a small sub-catchment of the Trail Valley Creek, approximately 60km north of Inuvik. The data were collected under Project HYDRA, a NERC funded UK research project linking Heriot Watt University, the Universities of Durham, Aberdeen and Stirling, and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh. Project HYDRA is part of the UK Arctic Research Programme. Project HYDRA studies sites in Arctic Canada to investigate the biological, chemical and physical controls on the release of greenhouse gases from permafrost into melt water and to the atmosphere and how these emissions will influence global warming. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1ee887d3-aabd-4fb7-b48e-056229a15c6f

  • This dataset contains vascular plant species abundance, average sward height, and soil analysis data from Parsonage Down National Nature Reserve (NNR), in southern England, in 1970, 1990 and 2016. Vascular plant species abundance and average sward height were recorded for each quadrat located along one of four transects. The transects were located in a CG2 Festuca ovina – Avenula pratensis grassland which dominates the majority of the site. Soil samples were also taken from various points along each transect and subsequently analysed for pH, loss-on-ignition, exchangeable potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphate and total nitrogen. The dataset was created for a study which examined long-term vegetation change at the nature reserve. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ffc06839-e64c-4844-aae7-db3b0a012e2e

  • The data consist of general physical, biological and chemical parameters for soil samples taken in the Conwy catchment in North West Wales. Samples were collected between 2013 and 2014 across a land use intensification gradient ranging from semi-natural peatlands, acid grasslands to improved grasslands and arable fields. Soil cores were taken to a depth of 1 metre and divided into 15 centimetre (cm) depth increments. General soil physical and chemical parameters were measured at each depth increment for most of the sites. Biological (root and fine root biomass) parameters were assessed in the topsoil 0-15 cm in 5 cm intervals. Soil parameters were tested across a land use intensification gradient to detect parameters that can predict aboveground biomass production across different land management types. Data were used to enhance the predictions of biomass production in the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator model (JULES). Measurements informed the improvement of the nitrogen cycle component in the model. Measurements were undertaken by trained members of staff from Bangor University, the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and Exeter University. This data was collected for the NERC project 'The Multi-Scale Response of Water quality, Biodiversity and Carbon Sequestration to Coupled Macronutrient Cycling from Source to Sea' (NE/J011991/1). The project is also referred to as Turf2Surf. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6566a706-9c55-4f7f-b33d-27bc29c73274

  • These data consist of stream water chemistry for selected Welsh upland rivers. The sampling sites were located in sixty one small and medium catchments. Catchments were chosen from the Welsh Acid Water Surveys (WAWS) program (41 sites) and the Wye catchment (20 sites). Results for pH, alkalinity, conductivity and major cation and anion measurements are presented for the WAWS catchments. Results for pH, alkalinity, conductivity and major anion measurements are presented for the Wye catchment. Samples from the Wye catchment were collected in May 2012. Samples from the WAWS catchments were taken during the summer and autumn of 2012 and spring and summer of 2013. The data were collected to characterise water chemistry variation along a gradient of aquatic biodiversity associated with different environmental settings for example land-use intensify and recovery from acidification. Dr Isabelle Durance was responsible for organising the surveys, Dr Hugh Feeley was in charge of collecting and preserving the water samples. Analysis of the water samples was carried out at the Forest Research Laboratories. The work was carried out under Diversity in Upland Rivers for Ecosystem Service Sustainability (DURESS) project (Grant reference NERC NE/J014818/1). DURESS was a project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (BESS) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d329ca18-c3d8-49f0-b2fd-5243d76dc650

  • Data comprise pH and bulk density measurements (location (longitude, latitude), depth, bulk density) for multiple soil profiles in the SikSik catchment, North West Territories, Canada. Samples were collected along a transect in September 2014. Soil samples were taken near additional soil pits. Soil depth and sampling location (latitude and longitude) was recorded. Bulk density was determined according to Blake and Hartge (1986). pH was determined with the 1:5 soil:water suspension method (see supporting documentation). The data were collected under Project HYDRA, a NERC funded UK research project linking Heriot Watt University, the Universities of Durham, Aberdeen and Stirling, and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh. Project HYDRA is part of the UK Arctic Research Programme. Project HYDRA studies sites in Arctic Canada to investigate the biological, chemical and physical controls on the release of greenhouse gases from permafrost into melt water and to the atmosphere and how these emissions will influence global warming. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a37e6aa4-b003-49bd-9a16-619a7d0dd714

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset contains calculated breeding success rates for six seabird species from representative colonies on the Isle of May, off the East coast of Scotland. Annual breeding success has been measured as the number of chicks fledged per active nest for the Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica, since 1982), common guillemot (Uria aalge, since 1982), razorbill (Alca torda, since 1982), European shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis, since 1987), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla, since 1987) and northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis, since 1987). The number of active nests recorded are also provided. Data were collected as part of the Isle of May long-term study (IMLOTS), which aims to identify the impact of environmental change on seabirds and their associated ecosystems. This monitoring has been ongoing since 1974, by essentially the same team of scientists, using the same well-documented methods throughout this time. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d38b609b-7bc1-4204-86dd-022375208d4f

  • This dataset consists of a survey of the vegetational impacts of deer in 20 forests as part of the NERC Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme. It is widely accepted, at least in principle, that most kinds of natural resources are best handled collaboratively. Collaborative management avoids conflict and enhances the efficiency with which the resource is managed. However, simply knowing that collaboration is a good idea does not guarantee that collaboration can be achieved. In this project, the researchers have addressed issues of conflict and collaboration in ecological resource management using the example of wild deer in Britain. Deer are an excellent example since they highlight problems around ownership and because they offer both societal benefits and drawbacks. Wild deer are not owned, though the land they occupy is. As deer move around, they usually cross ownership boundaries and thus provoke potential conflicts between neighbouring owners who have differing management goals. Deer themselves are valued and a key component of the natural environment, but their feeding commonly limits or prevents woodland regeneration and can thus be harmful to ecological quality. Deer provide jobs but they also provoke traffic accidents. This study used a variety of methods from across the natural and social sciences, including choice experiments, semi-structured interviews with individuals and focus groups. It also incorporated the use of participatory GIS to map deer distributions and habitat preferences in conjunction with stakeholders. The study confirmed conventional wisdom about the importance of collaboration. However, it also showed that there were many barriers to achieving effective collaboration in practice, such as contrasting objectives, complex governance arrangements, power imbalances and personal relationships. Mechanisms for enhancing collaboration, such as incentives and incorporating deer within broader landscape management objectives, were examined. Though these proposals were worked out for the case of deer, they are likely to be applicable much more widely and should be considered in other cases of disputed or rapidly changing ecological resource management. This dataset consists of a survey of the vegetational impacts of deer in 20 forests. The interview and focus group transcripts, and the choice experiment datasets from this study are available at the UK Data Archive under study number 6545 (see online resources). Further documentation for this study may be found through the RELU Knowledge Portal and the project's ESRC funding award web page (see online resources).

  • Data comprise meterological measurements (mean, minimum and maximum daily air temperature, minimum and maximum daily relative humidity, wind speed (kilometres per second at 10metres height), dew point temperature, estimated actual vapour pressure, precipitation, estimated surface resistance, estimated albedo and estimated Potential evapotranspiration (PET)) for the Siksik catchment, North West Territories, Canada for 2013 and 2014. The data were collected under Project HYDRA, a NERC funded UK research project linking Heriot Watt University, the Universities of Durham, Aberdeen and Stirling, and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh. Project HYDRA is part of the UK Arctic Research Programme. Project HYDRA studies sites in Arctic Canada to investigate the biological, chemical and physical controls on the release of greenhouse gases from permafrost into melt water and to the atmosphere and how these emissions will influence global warming. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5bb560ee-15bf-4ab9-8c2e-3a76c688e69d

  • The dataset includes information on antibiotic-resistance and resistance genes in bacteria (Escherichia coli) from humans, poultry and the environment in rural households, poultry farms and urban food markets. The rural households and poultry farms (broiler chickens) were located in Mirzapur, Tangail district; and urban food markets were located in Dhaka city, Bangladesh. Environmental samples were collected from surface water, water supply, wastewater, soil, animal faeces (poultry and cattle) and solid waste between February 2017 and October 2018 . DNA samples from antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in all samples were analysed for quantitative assessment of two resistance genes. Trained staff from the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) undertook sample collection and laboratory analysis. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence and abundance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and associated genes among humans, poultry and environmental compartments in Bangladesh. The survey was part of a wider research project, Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Antimicrobial Resistance Transmission from the Outdoor Environment to Humans in Urban and Rural Bangladesh. The research was funded by NERC/BBSRC/MRC on behalf of the Antimicrobial Resistance Cross-Council Initiative award NE/N019555/1. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0239cdaf-deab-4151-8f68-715063eaea45

  • This dataset includes stream and rainfall hydrochemistry of the Plynlimon research catchments in Mid Wales. The data cover the period from March 2016 to March 2019. Sampling was carried out fortnightly from March 2016 to July 2017. From August 2017 to November 2018 stream samples were collected every four weeks and the rain sample every two weeks. From December 2018 onwards all samples were collected every four weeks. Data are presented for major anions and cations, pH, conductivity, alkalinity, in-situ measurements of water temperature and stream flow for the six stream locations, and air temperature and volume for the rainfall sites. Stream samples were taken using a grab technique and filtered in the field. Rain samples were collected using bulk precipitation collectors. Fieldwork was carried out by CEH members of staff trained in the fieldwork techniques required. Chemical analysis was carried out by qualified CEH chemists at laboratories at CEH Lancaster and CEH Bangor. The Plynlimon research catchments lie within the headwaters of the River Severn and the River Wye in the uplands of mid-Wales. Intensive and long-term monitoring within the catchments underpins a wealth of hydrological and hydro-chemical research. Monitoring is funded by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, and is ongoing since 1968. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/54fe47f3-778e-4e0b-8cf5-b2fda2473b7f