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temperature

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  • This dataset contains surface temperature measurements from the University of Leeds' two Heitronics KT15.85 infra red radiative temperature sensors mounted on board the Swedish Icebreaker Oden durning Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE). ACSE took place in the Arctic during summer 2014. These measurements were used to complement a suite of other observations taken during the cruise. Those of the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. Both instruments were mounted to point to starboard, but instrument 1 pointing 45 degrees forward and instrument 2 pointing 45 degrees aft, taking raw measurements at 1Hz. The data contain both the raw measured temperature (t_meas) and a corrected value, adjusted for reflection of thermal radiation from surface. The correction follows that developed by Phil Hignett for a similar sensor on the UK Met Office C130 aircraft : MRF Tech note 28, 1988. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements.

  • This dataset contains surface air temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) measurements from the Meteorologiska Institutionen Stockholms Universitet (MISU) Rotronic T/RH sensor mounted on board the Swedish Icebreaker Oden durning Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE). ACSE took place in the Arctic during summer 2014. These measurements were used to complement a suite of other observations taken during the cruise. Those of the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. Measurements were made at 1 Hz frequency and this dataset was prepared for archiving by Ian Brooks, University of Leeds. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements.

  • This dataset contains humidity and temperature profiles from the NCAS Humidity And Temperature PROfilers (HATPRO) scanning radiometer on board the Alliance research vessel for the Iceland Greenland seas Project (IGP). The Iceland Greenland seas Project (IGP) was an international project involving the UK, US a Norwegian research communities. The UK component was funded by NERC, under the Atmospheric Forcing of the Iceland Sea (AFIS) project (NE/N009754/1)

  • This dataset contains surface temperature measurements from the University of Leeds Heitronics KT15.85 infra red radiative temperature sensor mounted at a 1.5-metre mast on an ice floe during the ice camp period of the joint Arctic Climate Across Scales (ACAS) and Microbiology-Ocean-Cloud Coupling in the High Arctic (MOCCHA) projects. Both part of the Arctic Ocean 2018 (AO2018) expedition to the High Arctic. AO2018 took place in the Arctic from 1 August until 21 September 2018. These measurements were used to complement a suite of other observations taken during the expedition. Those of the UK contribution, as well as selected other data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the Bolin Centre for Climate Research MOCCHA/AO2018 holdings. These data consist of quality controlled measurements at 1s. The UK participation of MOCCHA was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/R009686/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF).

  • HIRDLS was a joint US-UK development effort, with sponsorship by the British National Space Centre and the Natural Environment Research Council in the UK, and by NASA in the US. HIRDLS was an mid-infrared limb-scanning radiometer (21 channels from 6.12 to 17.76 µm and provides sounding observations to observe the lower stratosphere with improved sensitivity and accuracy. HIRDLS was carried on the Aura mission, part of the A-train procession of polar orbiting satellites forming part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). This dataset collection contains data of the global distributions of temperature, clouds, aerosols, and 10 trace species O3, H2O, CH4, N2O, NO2, HNO3, N2O5, CFC11, CFC12, and ClONO2 in the stratosphere and upper troposphere at high vertical and horizontal resolution in the Earth's atmosphere between about 8 and 100 km, from the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) instrument. The instrument provides high vertical resolution information despite the fact that the optical beam is partially obstructed between the scan mirror and the aperture, probably by a piece of inner lining material that became detached during launch. HIRDLS science-team members have produced correction algorithms that make use of the partial view of the atmosphere (vertical scans around azimuth angle of 47 degree line of sight to the orbital plane, on the side away from the sun). In spite of this anomaly, HIRDLS has retained most of its scientific capabilities to support the Aura Mission. HIRDLS was carried on the Aura mission, part of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). Aura was launched on 15th July 2004 at 11:01:59 a.m. BST from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

  • The CAST dataset contains data produced by the NERC Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics (CAST) project. CAST was a collaborative initiative with NASA's Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX) programme to study the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) over the Pacific Ocean and South East Asia. This dataset contains measurements of temperature, humidity, wind and ozone.

  • The data were collected by the Met Office’s Radiometrics TP/WVP-3000 which was deployed to Linkenholt on 13 June until 21 September 2005. The dataset contains plots of temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and rainfall amount. It was initially configured to view in the zenith direction with very high time resolution (~12 s). All channels also viewed the internal black body target for relative calibration, initially every 5 minutes. However, initially this did not take place between 11 – 13 UTC due to a configuration error, which was corrected on 8 July 2005. Prior to this date, the calibration of data around noon is prone to drift. The radiometer ran continuously in this mode until 20 July 2005, when it was re-configured to alternative between zenith views and internal black body calibration views in a 30 s cycle because of concerns over the drift in calibration over the previous 5 minute calibration period. There was a power outage on 2 August 2005 from 0730 – 0946 UTC when no radiometer data was available.

  • The UK Climate Projections 2009 (UKCP09) projections of temperature from low, medium and high emissions scenarios' equivalent global temperature changes. They are probabilistic climate predictions based on families of runs of the Met Office Hadley Centre climate models HadCM3, HadRM3 and HadSM3, plus climate models from other climate centres contributing to IPCC AR4 and CMIP3. The equivalent changes in global temperatures are taken from three emissions scenarios: low (IPCC SRES: B1), medium (IPCC SRES: A1B), and high (IPCC SRES: A1FI). Each scenario provides estimates over seven 30 year period averages: 2010-2039, 2030s = 2020-2049, 2040s = 2030-2059, 2050s = 2040-2069, 2060s = 2050-2079, 2070s = 2060-2089, 2080s = 2070-2099. Temperature changes are given relative to 1961-1990.

  • The longest available instrumental record of temperature in the world is now available at the BADC. The daily data starts in 1772. The mean, minimum and maximum datasets are updated monthly, with data for a month usually available by the 3rd of the next month. A provisional CET value for the current month is calculated on a daily basis. The mean daily data series begins in 1772. Mean maximum and minimum daily and monthly data are also available, beginning in 1878. Yearly files are provided from 1998 onwards. These historical temperature series are representative of the Midlands region in England, UK (a roughly triangular area of the United Kingdom enclosed by Bristol, Lancashire and London). The following stations are used by the Met Office to compile the CET data: Rothamsted, Malvern, Squires Gate and Ringway. But in November 2004, the weather station Stonyhurst replaced Ringway and revised urban warming and bias adjustments have now been applied to the Stonyhurst data after a period of reduced reliability from the station in the summer months. The data set is compiled by the Met Office Hadley Centre.

  • Data were collected under the NERC funded project - The role of land-use change on influencing mountain climate on Kilimanjaro, East Africa (NE/J013366/1) - lead by Dr Nicholas Pepin (University of Portsmouth) which investigated the influence of land-use on surface climate (temperature and moisture availability) on Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa. Relative humidity measurements were taken at hourly intervals at 23 stations on Mount Kilimanjaro between September 2012 and September 2015. Specific station locations (elevation and lat/long) are stated in the data and are ordered in a transect across the mountain from South-West over the top to North-East. Two of the stations have both ground level and air level sensors (hence there are 25 readings not 23). Additional information about station locations and missing data can be found in a PDF on the CEDA archive.