Keyword

precipitation

41 record(s)
 
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  • This dataset contains visibility and precipitation measurements from the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) Vaisala FD12P present weather sensor, operated by cruise participants from Stockholm University, on board Icebreaker Oden mounted on board the Swedish Icebreaker Oden durning Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE). These data were then prepared by Ian Brooks from the University of Leeds for inclusion in this archive. ACSE took place in the Arctic during summer 2014. These measurements were used to complement a suite of other observations taken during the cruise. Those of the UK contribution, as well as selected other data such as these data, are available within the associated data collection in the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) archives. Other cruise data may be available in the NOAA ACSE and The Bolin Centre for Climate Research SWERUS (SWEdish-Russian-US) holdings - see online resources linked to this record. Some outputs from this instrument were used as part of the quality control for some other measurements. The Arctic Cloud Summer Expedition (ACSE) was a collaboration between the University of Leeds, the University of Stockholm, and NOAA-CIRES. ACSE aimed to study the response of Arctic boundary layer cloud to changes in surface conditions in the Arctic Ocean as a working package of the larger Swedish-Russian-US Investigation of Climate, Cryosphere and Carbon interaction (SWERUS-C3) Expedition in Summer 2014. This expedition was a core component to the overall SWERUS-C3 programme and was supported by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. ACSE took place during a 3-month cruise of the Swedish Icebreaker Oden from Tromso, Norway to Barrow, Alaska and back over the summer of 2014. During this cruise ACSE scientists measured surface turbulent exchange, boundary layer structure, and cloud properties. Many of the measurements used remote sensing approaches - radar, lidar, and microwave radiometers - to retrieve vertical profiles of the dynamic and microphysical properties of the lower atmosphere and cloud. The UK participation of ACSE was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC, grant: NE/K011820/1) and involved instrumentation from the Atmospheric Measurement Facility of the UK's National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS AMF). This dataset collection contains data mainy from the UK contribution with some additional data from other institutes also archived to complement the suite of meteorological measurements.

  • This dataset collection contains 0.25 degree resolution 3-hourly and daily global Climate Prediction Center morphing method (CMORPH) precipitation data. CMORPH is the CPC Morphing technique which derives precipitation estimates from low orbiter satellite microwave observations.

  • This dataset contains 0.25 degree resolution daily global Climate Prediction Center morphing method (CMORPH) precipitation data. CMORPH is the CPC Morphing technique which derives precipitation estimates from low orbiter satellite microwave observations.

  • Surface precipitation measurements from the precipitation sensor on the Vaisala WXT510 instrument deployed at the Natural Environment Research Council's (NERC) Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST) Radar Facility, Capel Dewi, near Aberystwyth in West Wales. These data are available to any registered CEDA user under the UK Open Government Licence. Surface pressure, temperature and humidity data (PTU) from this instrument are also available as a separate dataset within the MST Radar Facility dataset collection. The WXT-510 instrument at the site began operational recording in December 2007 and ceased in January 2015, subsequently being replaced by a Vaisala WXT-520 instrument. The WXT520 data are also available from CEDA as part of the MST Radar Facility's dataset collection. Independent surface meteorological data are also collected from a suite of instruments by a Campbell Scientific CR10 Climate Data Logger. These data are available as a separate dataset within the MST Radar Facility dataset collection.

  • This dataset contains 0.25 degree resolution 3-hourly global Climate Prediction Center morphing method (CMORPH) precipitation data. CMORPH is the CPC Morphing technique which derives precipitation estimates from low orbiter satellite microwave observations.

  • This dataset collection brings together the datasets produced from the MICROphysicS of COnvective PrEcipitation (MICROSCOPE) project, the NERC funded part of the wider COPE (COnvective Precipitation Experiment) project. COPE was led by the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) and the UK Met Office, and involved scientists at the Universities of Leeds, Manchester and Reading, as well as international partners from the Universities of Purdue and Wyoming. As part of COPE, MICROSCOPE sought to improve predictions of severe convective rainfall by addressing the problem of the microphysics of precipitation in convective clouds. Data were collected during the project over Cornwall and Devon, UK, during July and August 2013 to study the clouds. Three research aircraft (Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe146, Met Office Civil Contingency Aircraft (MOCCA) and University of Wyoming King Air), a ground-based radar and several other ground-based instruments took measurements of exactly how the rain forms and develops. The aircraft were equipped with instruments that can distinguish between liquid and solid particles at 200 mph, for example. A major objective was to find these needles in the haystack – the first few ice crystals that form in amongst the hundreds of cloud droplets per every cubic centimetre of cloud.

  • Starting in February 2017, a network of 14 Thies™ manufactured Laser Precipitation Monitors (LPMs) were installed at various locations around the United Kingdom to create the Disdrometer Verification Network (DiVeN). The instruments were installed for verification of radar hydrometeor classification algorithms but are valuable for much wider use in the scientific and operational meteorological community. See dataset for further details. This collection not only holds the disdrometer data collected for the DiVeN project, but links to supporting observations from the Chilbolton Facility for Radio Research (CFARR) in Hampshire made use of by the project.

  • "The Mass balance and freshwater contribution of the Greenland ice sheet: a combined modelling and observational approach" project, which was a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) RAPID Climate Change Research Programme project (Joint International Round - NE/C51631X/1 - Duration 1 Jun 2005 - 30 Nov 2008) led Prof Jonathan Bamber of the University of Bristol, with co-investigators at the Nansen Environmental & Remote Sensing Center, Norway, the Royal Netherlands Meteorology Institute and Dr MR van den Broeke, University of Utrecht, Netherlands. The dataset quantifies how, where and when the Greenland ice sheet has fed fresh water through iceberg calving, subglacial melting and meltwater runoff into the surrounding ocean during the last half century. This dataset contains precipitation, evaporation and run off model outputs.

  • This dataset contains Global Precipitation Measurements (GPM) Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals (IMERG) v5. The Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) is the unified U.S. algorithm that provides the Day-1 multi-satellite precipitation product. The precipitation estimates from the various precipitation-relevant satellite passive microwave (PMW) sensors comprising the GPM constellation are computed using the 2014 version of the Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF2014), then gridded, intercalibrated to the GPM Combined Instrument product, and combined into half-hourly 10x10 km fields. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow.

  • Starting in February 2017, a network of 14 Thies™ manufactured Laser Precipitation Monitors (LPMs) were installed at various locations around the United Kingdom to create the Disdrometer Verification Network (DiVeN). The instruments were installed for verification of radar hydrometeor classification algorithms but are valuable for much wider use in the scientific and operational meteorological community. Every Thies LPM is able to designate each observed hydrometeor into one of 20 diameter bins from >= 0.125 mm to > 8 mm, and one of 22 speed bins from > 0.0 m s-1 to > 20.0 m s-1. A laser and diode receiver operate in tandem; a falling particle will occlude the beam. The duration of the occlusion and the maximum extent (measured by diode voltage) determines the fall velocity and diameter respectively. Using empirically-derived relationships, the instrument classifies precipitation into one of 11 possible hydrometeor classes in the form of a 'present weather code', with an associated indicator of uncertainty. To provide immediate feedback to data users, the observations are plotted in near real time (NRT) and made publicly available on a website within 7 minutes (see linked documentation section). A 'present weather code' is a World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) code used to define the present observatory weather (see linked documentation for the WMO present weather code list). The instruments belonged to the Met Office but were loaned to the National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS) for the duration of the project. NCAS handle the receiving server for real-time DiVeN data, which is the only route to this dataset. On-site collection of data are not guaranteed in all circumstances. Some of the sites rely on unreliable O2 3G dongles; whilst the Feshie instrument was solar and wind powered and the Coverhead instrument suffered from power / connectivity issues. Any missing data can be explained by these reasons, and are handled appropriately in the files. The data were collated into daily files of 1440 minutes. More information can be found in Pickering et al., 2018, see related documentation.