Keyword

Chlorophyll pigment concentrations in water bodies

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  • The dataset comprises chlorophyll-a concentrations from water samples taken during RRS James Clark Ross cruise JR291, from 12/11/2013 - 19/12/2013. The cruise sailed from Stanley, Falklands, and returned to the same port. Samples were taken during transit to Signy Island (South Orkneys), and then up through the Scotia Sea to BAS survey sites P2 and P3 as well as near South Georgia and in the Western Core Box survey area to the north of the island of South Georgia. 170 samples were collected from the ship’s uncontaminated underway supply, with an intake at approximately 6.5 m depth, every two hours during transit periods. 74 samples were collected, using a rosette sampler, from the upper 1000m during CTD (conductivity, temperature and depth probe) deployments. Each 300ml sample was filtered through a 0.8µm pore size, 25mm diameter, MPF300 filter, rinsed with Milli-Q water, placed in an Eppendorf tube and stored at -20°C for later analysis. Samples were extracted in 90 % acetone for 22-24 hours at 4°C and measured on a Trilogy Turner Designs 7200 lab fluorometer calibrated with a pure chlorophyll-a standard (Sigma, UK) and set up following the method of Welschmeyer (1994). Data have not been adjusted for blanks. The data set was from the annual Western Core Box Cruise run by British Antarctic Survey (BAS). Data were collected to support the PhD of Anna Belcher and provide seasonal context for the cruise in terms of the primary production in the surface ocean. Chlorophyll samples were collected by Elena Ceballos-Romero (University of Sevilla), Frédéric Le Moigne (NOC) and Anna Belcher (NOC). Chlorophyll samples were analysed at the National Oceanography centre in Southampton by Anna Belcher from NOC.

  • The dataset comprises chlorophyll-a concentrations from water samples taken during RRS James Clark Ross cruise JR304, from 15/11/2014 - 17/12/2014. The cruise sailed from Punta Arenas, Chile, returning to Stanley, Falkland Islands. Samples were taken during transit to Signy Island (South Orkneys), and then up through the Scotia Sea to BAS survey sites P2 and P3 as well as near South Georgia and in the Western Core Box survey area to the north of the island of South Georgia. 112 samples were collected from the ship’s uncontaminated underway supply, with an intake at approximately 6 m depth, every two hours during transit periods. 103 samples were collected, using a rosette sampler, from the upper 1000m during CTD (conductivity, temperature and depth probe) deployments. Each 300ml sample was filtered through a 0.8µm pore size, 25mm diameter, MPF300 filter, rinsed with milliQ water, placed in an eppendorf tube and stored at -20°C for later analysis. Samples were extracted in 90 % acetone for 22-24 hours at 4°C and measured on a Trilogy Turner Designs 7200 lab fluorometer calibrated with a pure chlorophyll-a standard (Sigma, UK) and set up following the method of Welschmeyer (1994). Data have not been adjusted for blanks. The data set was from the annual Western Core Box Cruise run by British Antarctic Survey (BAS). Data were collected to support the PhD of Anna Belcher and provide seasonal context for the cruise in terms of the primary production in the surface ocean. Chlorophyll samples were taken by Jenny Thomas (BAS), Gabi Stowasser (BAS), Sophie Fielding(BAS), Vicky Peck (BAS), Jess Gardner (University of East Anglia and BAS), Cecilia Liszka (BAS), Manon Duret (National Oceanography Centre, NOC), Anna Belcher (NOC), Anna Mikis (Cardiff University) , Marianne Wootton (Sir Alistair Hardy Foundation for Ocean Science), Sebastien Floter (GEOMAR Kiel). Chlorophyll samples were analysed aboard the R.R.S. James Clark Ross by Manon Duret and Anna Belcher from NOC.

  • This document describes CTD data collected on three cruises undertaken within the Dogger Bay Bank between August and November 2004, the RV Endeavour 12/04 (September 30 – October 10), 13/04 (August 31 – September 04) and 14/04 (October 22 – November 01). Ship-deployed CTDs were used to collect data at stations throughout each of the cruises. The cruises formed the research component of CEFAS project A1225 – North Sea Dogger Bank. This project is aimed at achieving a better understanding of the dynamics of the circulation processes of the seas around the UK, in order to characterise the extent and nature of density driven and seasonal jet-like circulation which acts as a direct and rapid pathway for transport of material. This project was conducted by the Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), Lowestoft Laboratory, led by Dr. Stephen Dye. The CTD data have been received by BODC as raw files from the RV Endeavour, processed and quality controlled using in-house BODC procedures and are available online to download from the BODC website.

  • The data set includes Sea Rover undulating oceanographic recorder data, including temperature, salinity and chlorophyll profiles. The data were collected in the North Atlantic during the 1980s. Data collection was undertaken along numerous sections between 1981 and 1987, as follows: 1981 - 5 sections and polar front box survey; 1983 - 5 sections and polar front box survey; 1984 - 6 sections; 1985 - 3 sections; 1986 - 4 sections; 1987 - 2 sections. The sections vary in length between 500 and 1000 miles and the data includes a number of repeated traverses between the Azores and the Ocean Weather Ship at Station 'Charlie'. The data were collected by the Institut fur Meereskunde, Kiel and have been assembled by the British Oceanographic Data Centre.

  • The data set includes the classical oceanographic parameters of temperature, salinity, nutrients, oxygen, pH, alkalinity, and chlorophyll-a. This data set comprises more than 100,000 profiles collected by UK research and naval vessels in the shelf seas around the UK, the North Atlantic, the Norwegian Sea, the Barents Sea, the Mediterranean Sea, the South Atlantic, the Southern Oceans, the Indian Ocean, the Arabian Sea, the East Indian Archipelago (Indonesia) and the Pacific Ocean since the beginning of the twentieth century. In recent years, conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data have been collected in a higher resolution form than water bottle data; these have been included in this data set in a reduced resolution/water bottle form and merged with any available chemical parameters. This data set is one of the most complete of its kind in the world; the majority of the data known to have been collected prior to 1970 have been 'rescued' and work will continue to rescue the remainder. All of the profiles in this data set have been quality checked, cross-checked against original documentation, and all duplications removed. This data set has been compiled by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) Oceanographic Data Centre and is available from the ICES website.

  • The 'End of the Pier' Menai Strait data set is a collection of biogeochemical and physical parameters (including temperature, salinity, transmittance and attenuation of the water column) measured in the Menai Strait since 1955.The aim is to concatenate data both historical and current, preventing the loss of valuable information and creating a time series for a variety of parameters in a unique environment. Data have been extracted from Ph.D. and M.Sc. theses undertaken at the School of Ocean Sciences (SOS) at Bangor University, in addition to published sources. In all cases data has undergone a very thorough quality audit and sufficient detail is provided so that the original source may be located. Data collection is ongoing but the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) only holds data up to 2003.

  • The dataset comprises 44 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the North Sea area specifically Wee Bankie/Marr Bank during the month of May 2005. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Fisheries Research Services Aberdeen Marine Laboratory.

  • This dataset consists of near real-time ocean observations from an autonomous underwater glider, sampling at the Joint North Sea Information System (JONSIS) hydrographic section (2.23°W to 0° at 59.28°N) between 12th October and 2nd December 2013. The measurements were made by a Seaglider (serial number 502) and consist of full-depth temperature, salinity, oxygen, chlorophyll and optical backscatter observations. Dive-average current observations were also collected. This dataset contains standard raw NetCDF (.nc), engineering (.eng) and log (.log) files captured using Seaglider base station version V2.05. The glider deployment was a collaborative effort between the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Marine Scotland Science. Deployment took place from Research Ship MRV Scotia, whilst recovery utilised MPV Jura. The JONSIS repeat section crosses the path of the Fair Isle Current and the East Shetland Atlantic Inflows, key routes by which Atlantic water enters the northern North Sea.

  • The dataset comprises 11 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from the North Sea area including specifically Wee Bankie, Marr Bank and the Firth of Forth during March 2004. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Fisheries Research Services Aberdeen Marine Laboratory.

  • This dataset consists of observations from two autonomous underwater gliders deployed by the University of East Anglia, UK and Sultan Qaboos University, Oman. The two Seagliders, Humpback serial number SG579 and Orca serial number SG510, collected data to investigate physical-biological interactions in the water column. The gliders were deployed in the Gulf of Oman approximately 10 km from Muscat, at the 120 m isobath. Both gliders repeatedly surveyed a 76 km section across the shelf, continental slope and open ocean between 24°15’ N, 59° E and 23°39.5’ N, 58°39’ E. Humpback, SG579 obtained 1,424 vertical profiles over a 91 day period (4 March 2015 to 3 June 2015), repeating the section 24 times. Orca, SG510 obtained 1,646 vertical profiles over a 109 day period (9 December 2015 to 27 March 2016), repeating the section 28 times. The glider data were processed using the UEA Seaglider Toolbox and standard techniques were used for calibration of the data. The data are held at BODC as a series of netCDF, .eng and .log files alongside a .mat file containing all processed data.