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Atmospheric conditions

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  • Airborne and model data collected during the ACCACIA - Aerosol-Cloud Coupling And Climate Interactions in the Arctic project. The dataset comprises airborne in situ measurements of cloud microphysical properties, the vertical structure of the boundary layer and aerosol properties, and the fluxes of solar and infra red radiation above, below, and within cloud. Data was collected on board the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 aircraft and the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Masin aircraft. It also contains data from specially configured Met Office Unified Model runs. AMS and SP2 data measured on board the Research Ship James Clark Ross during ACCACIA is also available. This project is part of the NERC Arctic research programme. (NERC Reference: NE/I028858/1).

  • The data set comprises time series measurements from offshore pressure gauges mounted on the sea floor. The data holdings are approximately 250 observation months from 100 sites. The data have mainly been collected in the continental shelf seas around the British Isles. Data records contain date/time, total pressure and, occasionally, temperature. The sampling interval is typically 15 minutes or hourly, over deployment periods ranging from 1 to 6 months. Data were collected mainly by the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory (POL), now the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) at Liverpool, and are managed by the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC).

  • READER (REference Antarctic Data for Environmental Research) is a project of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR http://www.scar.org/) and has the goal of creating a high quality, long term dataset of mean surface and upper air meteorological measurements from in-situ Antarctic observing systems. These data will be of value in climate research and climate change investigations. The primary sources of data are the Antarctic research stations and automatic weather stations. Data from mobile platforms, such as ships and drifting buoys are not being collected since our goal is to derive time series of data at fixed locations. Surface and upper air data are being collected and the principal statistics derived are monthly and annual means. Daily data will not be provided in order to keep the data set to a manageable size. With the resources available to the project, it is clearly not possible to collect all the information that could be required by the whole range of investigations into change in the Antarctic. Instead a key set of meteorological variables (surface temperature, mean sea level pressure and surface wind speed, and upper air temperature, geopotential height and wind speed at standard levels) are being assembled and a definitive set of measurements presented for use by researchers. A lot of stations have been operated in the Antarctic over the years; many for quite short periods. However, our goal here is to provide information on the long time series that can provide insight into change in the Antarctic. So to be included, the record from a station must extend for 25 years, although not necessarily in a continuous period, or be currently in operation and have operated for the last 10 years. In READER we have chosen to use only data from year-round stations.

  • Biologically relevant radiation has been recorded since February 1997 using a Bentham spectroradiometer at Rothera. The Bentham spectroradiometer is sited on the roof of the Bonner Laboratory at Rothera. It measures spectral global irradiance between 280 and 600 nm (wavelengths from below UV-B to the middle of the visible range) with a step size of 0.5 nm and a resolution of 1 nm. Scans are recorded at various time intervals depending on the time of day and season peaking at every 30 minutes while the sun is above the horizon from the beginning of September until the end of April. These scans can be used to measure the amount of solar radiation reaching the earth''s surface at Rothera. It provides particularly useful background data for studies on the effects of increased UV-B, due to the ozone hole, on the plants and microbes in regions around Rothera.

  • UK Met Office UM (Unified Model) output for Larsen Ice Shelf, run at 1.5km resolution. Modelling was carried out to support the Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project during the 2010-2011 field season.

  • Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model output for Larsen Ice Shelf, run at 1km resolution. Modelling was carried out to support the Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project during the 2010-2011 field season.

  • UK Met Office UM (Unified Model) output for Larsen Ice Shelf, run at 4km resolution. Modelling was carried out to support the Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project during the 2010-2011 field season.

  • Comprehensive measurements were taken on the Larsen C Ice Shelf and used to compute the Surface Energy Budget (SEB). Data were collected from two automatic weather stations (AWS) put in place in January 2009. Parallel to the AWS measurements, high-quality spectral and broadband radiation measurements were carried out, as well as direct measurements of turbulent fluxes. A special part of the field experiment focused on the direct measurement of liquid water content in the snowpack, using time-domain reflectometry (TDR).

  • Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model output for Larsen Ice Shelf run at 4km resolution. Modelling was carried out to support the Orographic Flows and the Climate of the Antarctic Peninsula (OFCAP) project during the 2010-2011 field season.

  • The oceanographic part of the ACSIS (North Atlantic Climate System Integrated Study) project uses sustained observations from the North Atlantic, gathered during other observational programs, such as RAPID, Argo and OSNAP, to generate ocean heat budgets. The overarching objective of the ACSIS project is to enhance the UK’s capability to detect, attribute and predict changes in the North Atlantic Climate System, comprising: the North Atlantic Ocean, the atmosphere above it including its composition, and interactions with Arctic Sea Ice and the Greenland Ice Sheet. The data will be combined with models to develop new products. ACSIS is delivered by a partnership between six NERC Centres, National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS), National Oceangraphy Centre (NOC), British Antarctic Survey (BAS), National Centre for Earth Observation (NCEO), Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM), Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) and the UK Met Office. ACSIS has been fully funded for five years (2016-2021) through the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Long Term Science commissioning, which aims to encourage its research centres to work closely together to tackle major scientific and societal challenges. The oceanographic data are held by the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC), the atmospheric, cryospheric and model data are held by the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA).