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University of Aberdeen

29 record(s)

 

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  • Whole rock and sediment geochemical data covering a range of elements, where values are given in ppm (parts per million) or as a % (percentage). The data is ordered chronologically in an excel spreadsheet and each sample is given a ‘Sample ID’, ‘Lithology’, ‘Locality’, ‘Age’ and ‘Date analysed’, followed by whole rock and sediment values for the following elements; Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Hf, Hg, In, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Pt, Rb, Re, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Sn, Sr, Ta, Te, Th, Ti, TI, U, V, W, Y, Zn, Zr. Cells which are highlighted orange signify that the value given was below the detection limit. The values in orange cells have been halved to maintain spreadsheet functionality (i.e. to remove ‘<’ symbols). Cells which have been highlighted blue signify that the value given was above the detection limit. ALS method:ME-MS41L (https://www.alsglobal.com/en/services-and-products/geochemistry/geochemistry-testing-and-analysis/whole-rock-analysis-and-lithogeochemistry) . The majority of the samples included in this data were collected in the UK, but, where appropriate, samples out with the UK were included. The majority of the data was collected from 2014 to 2019. Whole rock and sediment samples were analysed by solution ICP-MS. Samples of ~30 g were individually milled and homogenised, and 0.5 g were digested with aqua regia in a graphite heating block. The residue was diluted with deionised water (18 M¿ cm), mixed, and analysed using a Varian 725 instrument at ALS Minerals (Loughrea; method ID: ME-MS41L). This data was collected to better understand the low temperature cycling of Telurium (Te) and Sellenium (Se) in the geological environment. For example, a range of ochre samples were included in this database. Ochres are a modern precipitate commonly found in rivers and streams which flow through geographical areas with a history of mining resources which are rich in sulphides. Iron from the sulphides are leached out and deposited downstream, coating river and stream beds, giving a red, yellow or orange colouration. Ochres can be a sink for trace metals, so analysing the abundances of these can be informative from a resource perspective but also from an environmental hazard perspective. This would be useful for researchers who require reference data for whole rock and sediment data of a particular lithology or age. This data is was collected by, but not limited to the following individuals; John Parnell, Sam Spinks, Josef Armstrong, Liam A Bullock, Magali Perez, Xueying Wang & Connor Brolly.

  • Field photographs of rock formations or modern precipitates from the sedimentary environment. Samples were collected throughout the UK. This data was collected between February 2019 and November 2019. This data was collected to better understand the low temperature cycling of Telurium (Te) and Sellenium (Se) in the geological environment. For example, a range of ochre samples were included in this data. Ochres are a modern precipitate commonly found in rivers and streams which flow through geographical areas with a history of mining resources which are rich in sulphides. Iron from the sulphides are leached out and deposited downstream, coating river and stream beds, giving a red, yellow or orange colouration. Ochres can be a sink for trace metals such as Te and Se, therefore studying these environments could be informative from a resource perspective but also from an environmental hazard perspective. This data would be useful for researchers who require reference photographs for similar studies or as an aid for resampling.

  • Summary output data (including soil organic carbon concentration, nitrogen, available water and carbon dioxide) from simulations of soil in a small agricultural catchment (Sunjia) in Southeast China (Jianxi province). The simulations were performed using the ECOSSE model; a pool-based carbon and nitrogen turnover model. The simulations were performed using soil and climate input data from the research farm. Input data for the simulations were provided by the soil science department of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Simulations were conducted in 2017. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2ce71612-df48-40f2-9402-03d93104c623

  • Data comprise pH and bulk density measurements (location (longitude, latitude), depth, bulk density) for multiple soil profiles in the SikSik catchment, North West Territories, Canada. Samples were collected along a transect in September 2014. Soil samples were taken near additional soil pits. Soil depth and sampling location (latitude and longitude) was recorded. Bulk density was determined according to Blake and Hartge (1986). pH was determined with the 1:5 soil:water suspension method (see supporting documentation). The data were collected under Project HYDRA, a NERC funded UK research project linking Heriot Watt University, the Universities of Durham, Aberdeen and Stirling, and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh. Project HYDRA is part of the UK Arctic Research Programme. Project HYDRA studies sites in Arctic Canada to investigate the biological, chemical and physical controls on the release of greenhouse gases from permafrost into melt water and to the atmosphere and how these emissions will influence global warming. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a37e6aa4-b003-49bd-9a16-619a7d0dd714

  • Data comprise soil organic carbon content from a simulation using the ECOSSE model; a pool-based carbon and nitrogen turnover model. Simulations were performed using input data from the Sunjia research farm in southeast China (Jianxi province). Data here is from simulations using the global version of the ECOSSE model, a package which applies the regular model spatially. Input data for the simulations were provided by the soil science department of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Simulations were conducted in 2018. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/876fa724-c3d3-4091-8de2-8140b7c973eb

  • Data comprise meterological measurements (mean, minimum and maximum daily air temperature, minimum and maximum daily relative humidity, wind speed (kilometres per second at 10metres height), dew point temperature, estimated actual vapour pressure, precipitation, estimated surface resistance, estimated albedo and estimated Potential evapotranspiration (PET)) for the Siksik catchment, North West Territories, Canada for 2013 and 2014. The data were collected under Project HYDRA, a NERC funded UK research project linking Heriot Watt University, the Universities of Durham, Aberdeen and Stirling, and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh. Project HYDRA is part of the UK Arctic Research Programme. Project HYDRA studies sites in Arctic Canada to investigate the biological, chemical and physical controls on the release of greenhouse gases from permafrost into melt water and to the atmosphere and how these emissions will influence global warming. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5bb560ee-15bf-4ab9-8c2e-3a76c688e69d

  • There is a report highlighting the approach for model construction and recommendations for any future work. There is an excel file pf processed data including time, centrifuge speed, water pressure, and temperature data. There is a zip folder containing photographs of the models, the instrumentaiton and granular ice used for model construction There is a zip folder containing the raw data.

  • Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry data, part of a suite of 51 elements using aqua regia ICP-MS techniques at ALS Minerals (Ireland).

  • The dataset contains concentrations of Total Organic Carbon, Chloride, Fluoride, Bromine, Sulfate, Potassium, Aluminium, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Sodium, Phosphorus, Chromium, Manganese, Cobalt, Nickel, Copper, Zinc, Arsenic, Selenium, Molybdenum, Cadmium, Lead and stable water isotopes (δD and δ18O) for 25 groundwater and surface water sampling locations, surveyed over the period February 2017 to May 2018 immediately following Dineo floods. The data were collected as part of the PULA project, which aimed at understanding the immediate effect of heavy rainfall and floods on water resources in arid Botswana and their transitional hydrologic readjustment towards the dry period, and the role of these events in supporting either or both resources replenishment and contamination. The project was co-ordinated by the University of Aberdeen, with partners at the Botswana International University of Science and Technology, the Government of Botswana Department of Water Affairs, and the International Water Management Institute. The project was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council as part of its Urgency grants scheme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c7793128-1961-45d5-aa18-5f023116784b

  • Data comprise sub-hourly discharge measurements including mean stream height, discharge and stream temperature collected at station S2 on the Siksik stream, North West Territories, Canada, between September 2009 and March 2010. Measurements were taken at a field site based at SikSik Creek a small sub-catchment of the Trail Valley Creek, approximately 60km north of Inuvik. The data were collected under Project HYDRA, a NERC funded UK research project linking Heriot Watt University, the Universities of Durham, Aberdeen and Stirling, and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH), Edinburgh. Project HYDRA is part of the UK Arctic Research Programme. Project HYDRA studies sites in Arctic Canada to investigate the biological, chemical and physical controls on the release of greenhouse gases from permafrost into melt water and to the atmosphere and how these emissions will influence global warming. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1ee887d3-aabd-4fb7-b48e-056229a15c6f