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Wind strength and direction

61 record(s)
 
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    The dataset comprises 86 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the North East Atlantic Ocean (limit 40W) area specifically in the upwelling off the NW African Coast, from January to March of 1985. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Institute for Marine Science, Kiel.

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    This dataset comprises hydrographic data profiles, collected by a salinity-temperature-depth (STD) sensor package, during January - March 1975. It incorporates STD sections along three lines perpendicular to the NW African coast between 20-26N. The data were collected by the University of Liverpool Department of Oceanography as part of a study of physical, biological and chemical processes involved in upwelling off the NW African Coast.

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    This dataset contains hydrographic profiles (temperature, salinity, oxygen, fluorometer, transmissometer, irradiance) and along track measurements (bathymetry, surface meteorology, sea surface hydrography), with discrete measurements including water chemistry (organic and inorganic nutrients, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, dissolved gases, trace metals) collected from a hydrographic section in the North Atlantic Ocean. This hydrographic section, designated A05 by the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), runs along a nominal latitude of 24.5N between Florida and either Spain, North Africa, Portugal or the Canary Islands. Four UK cruises (D279, D346, DY040 and JC191) have contributed to this dataset to date using CTD casts, vessel-mounted and lowered ADCPs, bottle sampling and meteorological measuring systems to collect data. The measurements were collected as one of the UK's contributions to the Global Ocean Ship-based Hydrographic Investigations Program (GO-SHIP) and with the aim of contributing to the study of decadal variability of the present ocean circulation and meridional transport of heat, freshwater and biogeochemistry, as part of the Climate Linked Atlantic Sector Science (CLASS) project. The work was led by teams from the National Oceanography Centre at Southampton. Data from the section are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC).

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    This dataset consists of underway meteorology, navigation and sea surface hydrography measurements from cruise JC044 and JC082 as well as 7 CTD casts for cruise JC082. Data were collected on two RRS James Cook cruises, JC044 and JC082, covering the Cayman Trough and Mid-Cayman Spreading Centre in the Caribbean Sea. Cruise JC044 took place between March 25th and April 22nd 2010 and cruise JC082 took place between February 6th and March 8th 2013. Navigation data were collected using an Applanix POSMV system and meteorology and sea surface hydrography were collected using the NMF Surfmet system. Both systems were run through the duration of the cruise, excepting times for cleaning, entering and leaving port, and while alongside. CTD data were obtained from a Seabird SBE CTD system fitted to a rosette and launched at stations along the cruise track. Data were collected as part of the NERC-funded project “Hydrothermal activity and deep-ocean biology of the Mid-Cayman Rise” which aimed to investigate the world's deepest under-sea volcanic ridge, the Mid-Cayman Rise, to advance understanding of patterns of biodiversity in the planet's largest ecosystem. By studying the geology and hydrography of the world's deepest seafloor spreading centre using established techniques, the project aimed to confirm the geological processes driving the vents and to reveal the evolutionary genetic relationships of their inhabitants to those in vents elsewhere. The project was funded by two NERC standard grants. The lead grant, NE/F017774/1, ran from 15 September 2009 to 01 March 2014, and was led by principal investigator Dr Jonathan TP Copley of University of Southampton, School of Ocean and Earth Sciences. The child grant, NE/F017758/1, ran from 19 July 2009 to 31 December 2013, and was led by Dr BJ Morton of National Oceanography Centre, Science and Technology. Underway navigation, meteorology and sea surface hydrography and CTD datasets have been received as raw files by BODC and are available upon request.

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    This dataset consists of measurements of underway meteorology, navigation and sea surface hydrography as well as underway discrete salinity samples. A comprehensive survey of the Tropical Atlantic was undertaken between June and August 2017. Data were collected on RRS James Cook cruise JC150. Navigation data were collected using an Applanix POSMV system and meteorology and sea surface hydrography were collected using the NMF Surfmet system. Both systems were run through the duration of the cruise, excepting times for cleaning, entering and leaving port, and while alongside. 65 salinity samples were taken from the non-toxic underway supply. The non-toxic, pumped seawater supply intake was located 5.5 m below the sea surface. Sample analysis was completed using a Guildline ‘Autosal’ salinometer. This cruise formed the field component of NERC Discovery Science project "Zinc, Iron and Phosphorus co-Limitation in the Ocean (ZIPLOc)". The data were collected in order to determine the prevalence of zinc and iron limitation of APA in the phosphate deplete subtropical North Atlantic Ocean; to quantify the impact of zinc-phosphorous and iron phosphorous co-limitation on biological activity, specifically phytoplankton growth, primary production and nitrogen fixation; and to quantify the significance of zonc-phosphorous and iron-phosphorous co-limitation in driving phytoplankton productivity over basin scales and multi-decadal time scales. The Discovery Science project was composed of Standard Grant reference NE/N001079/1 as the lead grant with child grant NE/N001125/1. The lead grant runs from 02 January 2017 to 03 February 2017 and the child grant runs from 01 February 2017 to 31 July 2019. Dr Claire Mahaffey of University of Liverpool, Earth, Ocean and Ecological Sciences was the principal investigator of the lead grant of this project. Prof Maeve C. Lohan of University of Southampton, School of Ocean and Earth Science was the principal investigator of the child grant. The underway discrete salinity samples data and the underway navigation, meteorology and sea surface hydrography data have been received by BODC as raw files from the RRS James Cook, processed and quality controlled using in-house BODC procedures and are will be made available online in the near future.

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    This dataset consists of measurements of various physical oceanographic parameters collected on a comprehensive survey of the Scotia Sea undertaken from 21 April and 22 May 2015. Data were collected on RRS James Clark Ross cruise JR311. Navigation data were collected using an Applanix POSMV system and meteorology and sea surface hydrography were collected using the NMF Surfmet system. Both systems were run through the duration of the cruise, excepting times for cleaning, entering and leaving port, and while alongside. A CTD was launched at 24 stations throughout the cruise. Moving Vessel Profilers, Seasoar towed CTD, oceanloggers, temperature loggers and MSS turbulence profilers were all towed for multiple sections of the cruise. Multiple temperature-chain loggers were deployed at stations throughout the cruise. JR311 was the research cruise conducted as the observational element of the NERC Standard Grant, Surface Mixed Layer Evolution at Submesoscales (SMILES). The project aims to improve our understanding of submesoscale dynamics in regions characterised by strong fronts and where they impact on water mass transformation. For this reason, the field site was chosen to be the subantarctic front (SAF) to the east of Drake Passage where the Antarctic Circumpolar Current generates a pronounced front between the warmer subantarctic water to the north and the subpolar water to the south. To the north of the SAF, subantarctic mode water is formed through a process previously considered to be governed by air-sea interaction alone. SMILES aims to investigate the extent to which submesoscale dynamics at the SAF and the surrounding region may impact on, and potentially govern, this process of water mass transformation. The Discovery Science project was led by Standard Grant reference NE/J009857/1, with child grants NE/J010472/1, NE/J010367/1 and NE/J008214/1. NE/J009857/1 was held at the University of Plymouth, School of Engineering, led by Dr. Phil Hosegood, running from 01 July 2014 to 31 December 2017. NE/J010472/1 was held at the University of Cambridge, School of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics, led by Dr Joh Ryan Taylor, running from 01 April 2013 to 30 September 2016. NE/J010367/1 was held at the Plymouth Marine Laboratory, led by Dr Ricardo Torres, running from 01 June 2014 to 30 June 2017. Finally, NE/J008214/1 was held at the NERC British Antarctic Survey, led by Professor Michael Meredith, running from 01 July 2013 to 31 October 2016. All data have been received by BODC as raw files from the RRS James Cook to be processed and quality controlled using in-house BODC procedures and made available online in the future. Data are available as raw files on request.

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    This dataset consists of measurements of underway meteorology, navigation and sea surface hydrography. The data were collected on RRS Discovery cruise DY051 through the Goban Spur and Rockall Trough areas of the North East Atlantic. The cruise spanned the 13th of May to the 3rd of June 2016. Navigation data were collected using an Applanix POSMV system and meteorology and sea surface hydrography were collected using the NMF Surfmet system. Both systems were run through the duration of the cruise, excepting times for cleaning, entering and leaving port, and while alongside. The data were collected as part of the MAC-EXP: Development of a pressurised sampling, experimentation and cultivation system for deep-sea sediments project. The project aims to develop a flexible, cost-effective alternative to in situ experimentation: a pressure-coring, experimentation and cultivation system that enables studies of deep-sea prokaryote biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, under ambient or manipulated pressure, temperature and oxygen conditions from any medium sized ocean going research ship with coring capability. This Multiple-Autoclave-Coring and Experimentation system (MAC-EXP) will aim to provide the possibility to systematically test the influence of environmental parameters, such as pressure, oxygen availability or pH on deep-sea organisms and their biochemistry, as well as on rates and pathways of biogeochemical and geomicrobial processes. The system will also aim to allow pioneering work in the field of marine biodiscovery: secondary metabolites from marine microorganisms are a rich source of chemical diversity and several marine-microbe derived compounds are now in clinical trials. Funding was provided by NERC Standard grants NE/I023465/1 (lead) and NE/I024232/1. The lead grant covered 01 February 2013 to 31 December 2016 and the child grant covered 01 April 2012 to 31 March 2015. Professor Ursula Witte of University of Aberdeen, Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences was the principal investigator for the lead grant. Professor Ronald J Parkes of Cardiff University School of Earth and Ocean Sciences was the principal investigator for the child grant. The underway navigation, meteorology and sea surface hydrography data have been received by BODC as raw files from the RRS Discovery, processed and quality controlled using in-house BODC procedures and will be made available online in the near future.

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    This dataset consists of physical oceanographic and meteorological data collected in the South Orkney Islands, Southern Ocean, onboard the RRS James Clark Ross during the period of 25 February 2016 until 25 March 2016 on JR15005 a South Orkney State of the Antarctic Ecosystem (SO-AntEco) cruise. Measurements were taken using conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profilers with attached auxiliary sensors, expendable bathythermographs (XBTs) and the ships underway monitoring system. Hydrographic profiles provide measurements of the water column, temperature, salinity, depth, conductivity, transmittance, fluorescence, irradiance, altimetry and dissolved oxygen. Underway measurements include meteorological, surface hydrography and navigational data. The data have been collected as part of the SO-AntEco project, a British Antarctic Survey (BAS) funded programme from 20 August 2015 to 24 August 2016 lead by Dr Huw Griffiths (BAS). This involved international collaboration with scientists from BAS, Scientific Committee for Antarctic Research (SCAR), Universities (Bristol, Hull, Liverpool and Oxford) and the Natural History Museum (NHM), London. This project was part of the wider SCAR biological research programme - State of the Antarctic Ecosystem (AntEco). The British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) hold CTD, XBT, navigation, meteorological and surface hydrographic data. The Polar Data Centre (PDC) at BAS are responsible for the long-term management of other datasets collected on cruise JR15005.

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    The Carbon Uptake and Seasonal Traits in Antarctic Remineralisation Depth (CUSTARD) data set comprises hydrographic data, including measurements of temperature, salinity and currents, complemented by bathymetric, meteorological and nutrient data. All the observational data from the project were collected at, and south of, the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) Global Southern Ocean Array, located south-west of Chile. Data collection activities span from November 2018 to January 2020 over 3 cruises (DY096, DY111 and DY112). The main aim of the CUSTARD project is to quantify the seasonal drivers of carbon fluxes in a region of the Southern Ocean upper limb, and estimate how long different quantities of carbon are kept out of the atmosphere based on the water flow routes at the observed remineralisation depths. The lead grant was funded by the NERC grant reference NE/P021247/1 with child grants NE/P021328/1, NE/P021336/1, NE/P021263/1. NE/P021247/1 was held at the National Oceanography Centre, led by Adrian Martin. Child grants were lead by Mark Moore of University of Southampton, Simon Ussher of University of Plymouth and Dorothee Bakker of University of East Anglia respectively.

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    The dataset comprises 4556 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the North East Atlantic Ocean (limit 40W) area specifically just north of Rockall Trough and just east of George Bligh Bank. The data were collected from July to September of 1978. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Institute for Marine Science, Kiel as part of the Joint Air-Sea Interaction (JASIN) project.