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University of York

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  • Data comprise phytohormone concentrations (plant growth hormones: adenosine, zeatin, isopentenyladenosine, indole-3-acetic acid and abscisic acid) measured during plant growth experiments in soil and hydroponic growth media in the presence and absence of earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris and Eisenia fetida respectively). Also presented are plant biomass, pH of the hydroponic solution and soil biological activity (concentration of Fluorescein diacetate - a measure of the hydrolytic capacity) at the end of the study. The study was funded by the NERC (Grant number NE/M000648/1). Mass spectrometry was carried out in The York Centre of Excellence in Mass Spectrometry; the centre was created thanks to a major capital investment through Science City York, supported by Yorkshire Forward with funds from the Northern Way Initiative, and subsequent support from EPSRC (EP/K039660/1; EP/M028127/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/809cd6e8-0615-45ff-b79b-6ba1ae474713

  • Data collected during a field experiment investigating the differences between greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes under a bioenergy crop Miscanthus x giganteus and a conventional arable crop, barley (Hordeum vulgare) on adjacent fields. Measurements taken include soil respiration (Rs) measured using Licor automated chambers and infrared gas analyser (IRGA), from collars excluding aboveground vegetation but not roots. Ancillary measurements included meteorological variables (air temperature and solar radiation) and soil variables (soil moisture and temperature at 5 cm depth). Data were collected between May and September 2013. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c397d6f4-96f4-4967-a0df-c64ef35ea572

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. Data are presented on earthworm abundance with distance from hedgerows was recorded for arable fields and pasture leys at farms at Little Langton, Hutton Wandesley, Overton and Whenby, Yorkshire. Sampling was carried out 12 – 26th May 2016. Pits were excavated and soil hand sorted for earthworms. Mustard solution was then poured into the pit and any emerging earthworms collected. All earthworms were preserved in ethanol for identification using the Sims and Gerard Field studies key. At each pit the following measurements were also taken: soil moisture, soil temperature, soil bulk density. The samples were taken to determine the influence of leys on soil quality by Miranda Prendergast-Miller and colleagues as part of the SoilBioHedge project (Grant Reference NE/M017095/1) funded by the NERC Soil Security Programme. (Grant Reference NE/M017044/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2c84ae3f-f785-4151-8efb-6a1598fd5a65

  • This dataset contains GPS data fixes (WGS84 format) from 32 European nightjars (Caprimulgus europaeus) . The data contains additional information on identity of the bird, date, time of fix acquisition, and the associated site and night number (between 6 and 17 nights of data, varying between individuals). These data were collected on the Humberhead peatlands NNR, South Yorkshire, from 2015 until 2018. Birds were caught in mist nets and tail-mounted miniaturised GPS tags (Pathtrack, Otley, UK; <3% bird bodyweight) were fitted by BTO-licensed researchers. Data were collected as part of a NERC ACCE-funded PhD. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/aa20f8c4-bbdb-4dfa-82b4-b9b3fd8f34eb

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. Data are presented on earthworm abundance with distance from hedgerows was recorded for arable fields and pasture leys at Spens farm, the University of Leeds experiment farms, Yorkshire. Sampling was carried out annual from April 2015 to April 2017 with additional sampling in December 2015, and July and October 2016. Pits were excavated and soil hand sorted for earthworms. Mustard solution was then poured into the pit and any emerging earthworms collected. All earthworms were preserved in ethanol for identification using the Sims and Gerard Field studies key. At each pit the following measurements were also taken: soil moisture, soil temperature, soil bulk density. The samples were taken to determine the influence of leys on soil quality by Miranda Prendergast-Miller and colleagues as part of the SoilBioHedge project (Grant Reference NE/M017095/1) funded by the NERC Soil Security Programme. (Grant Reference NE/M017044/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8ac670c7-17d8-433f-847c-170eeeb3ee47

  • This dataset contains home range size, habitat availability and selection ratio data, calculated from GPS data fixes collected from individual European nightjars, in four concurrent years (2015-2018). Home ranges are 95% areas of use, presented in hectares. Habitat availability data are presented as the percentage (%) of each habitat category (n = 6, pooled from 14 original habitat types) available to each individual within their 95% home range. Selection ratios are Manly Selection Ratios for 14 habitat types and express the extent to which each habitat type is used by each individual bird, compared to how much of it is available. Selection Ratios >1 express positive selection – i.e. used more than expected, given availability. Selection Ratios <1 express avoidance – i.e. used less than expected, given availability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d5cc1b92-6862-4475-8aa1-5936786d12ab

  • The datasets were collected during experiments undertaken to examine survival rates and larval performance of Speckled Wood butterflies (Pararge aegeria) in different habitats (grassland and woodland). The experiments were carried out between 2008 and 2010 by the University of York, at sites in Yorkshire, Great Britain. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ecb17680-da2e-49ae-b250-2d04a6a08d2a

  • These data comprise arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi diversity data from Sourhope field experiment site. AM fungi are biotrophic symbionts colonizing the majority of land plants, and are of major importance in plant nutrient supply. Using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) strategy, the diversity of AM fungi was assessed in 89 roots of three grass species (Agrostis capillaris, Festuca rubra, Poa pratensis) that co-occurred in the same plots of the Sourhope field experiment. The impact of different soil amendments (nitrogen, lime, nitrogen and lime) and insecticide application on AM fungal community was also recorded. Data were collected during a project funded under the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme, established in 1999 and centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders (Grid reference: NT 8545 1963). During the experiment, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5aa0e9ee-9604-4cba-a1ae-5d6708cf6438

  • The R code "carbon_stock_calculations.R" estimates aboveground carbon stocks for 49 plots in 14 fragmented forest sites and 4 continuous forest sites in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, using the vegetation dataset ‘Vegetation and habitat data for fragmented and continuous forest sites in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, 2017’. The 14 fragmented sites were all in Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil-certified oil palm plantations, and are hereafter termed 'conservation set-asides'. The code also estimates the aboveground carbon stocks of oil palm plantations for comparison. The R code "analyses_and_figures.R" runs analyses and makes figures of aboveground carbon stocks and associated plant diversity for these sites, as presented in Fleiss et al. (2020) This R code was created in order to investigate the following: (1) to establish the value of conservation set-asides for increasing oil palm plantation aboveground carbon stocks; (2) to establish whether set-asides with high aboveground carbon stocks can have co-benefits for plant diversity; (3) to compare the carbon stocks and vegetation structure of conservation set-asides with that of continuous forest, including assessing tree regeneration potential by examining variation in seedling density; (4) to examine potential drivers of variation in aboveground carbon stocks of conservation set-asides (topography, degree of fragmentation, and soil parameters); (5) to scale-up the estimates of the aboveground carbon stocks of conservation set-asides, in order to predict average carbon stocks of oil palm plantations with and without set-asides, and for varying coverage of set-asides across the plantation. Full details about this application can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9ff5cdca-b504-4994-8b07-5912ee6aff47

  • Data are presented on earthworm abundance with distance from hedgerows was recorded for arable fields and pasture leys at Spens farm, the University of Leeds experiment farms, Yorkshire. Sampling was carried out annual from April 2015 to April 2017 with additional sampling in December 2015, and July and October 2016. Pits were excavated and soil hand sorted for earthworms. Mustard solution was then poured into the pit and any emerging earthworms collected. All earthworms were preserved in ethanol for identification using the Sims and Gerard Field studies key. At each pit the following measurements were also taken: soil moisture, soil temperature, soil bulk density. The samples were taken to determine the influence of leys on soil quality by Miranda Prendergast-Miller and colleagues as part of the SoilBioHedge project (Grant Reference NE/M017095/1) funded by the NERC Soil Security Programme. (Grant Reference NE/M017044/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d3dcfd8a-918d-48a4-9511-ec832de34636