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  • This database comprises field notebooks reporting geological field work associated with NERC Standard Grant NE/R001324/1 from 1/10/2017 – 30/6/2021. The fieldwork involved examination of Ordovician – Devonian sequences from North Wales and Scotland. Samples were collected for palynological analysis. Palynological processing involves the recovery of organic-walled microfossils by hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acid maceration. Details of other non-NERC-funded fieldwork undertaken during this period is included in the field notebooks.

  • Field notebook photos and scans for NERC grant Tellurium and Selenium Cycling and Supply. Various sites in Ireland, Scotland, England, North Wales, Norway, Utah, Colorado and Wyoming.

  • This layer of the GeoIndex shows the location of available 1:10000 scale digital geological maps within Great Britain. The Digital Geological Map of Great Britain project (DiGMapGB) has prepared 1:625 000, 1:250 000 and 1:50 000 scale datasets for England, Wales and Scotland. The datasets themselves are available as vector data in a variety of formats in which they are structured into themes primarily for use in geographical information systems (GIS) where they can be integrated with other types of spatial data for analysis and problem solving in many earth-science-related issues. The DiGMapGB-10 dataset is as yet incomplete, current work is concentrated on extending the geographical cover, especially to cover high priority urban areas.

  • The database contains basic tabulated field data resulting from the work of the BGS East Grampians Project in the early 1980s to mid 1990s. Records include the locations of stations at which field observations were made, structural measurements and sample locations. To this end, the database provides an index to locations and structural data. However, it needs to be stated clearly that labels given to structural elements are largely subjective beyond the identification of bedding. This means that the structural data are largely unusable without a clear understanding of their context and with regard to the primary paper record on which descriptions of the observed structures are recorded. The data are held in MS ACCESS tables which are related via the Station number as the primary key. The coverage is mainly confined to the North East Grampian Highlands of Scotland. The database is currently unused and has not been added to since the end of the East Grampians Project. The station location and structural data are effectively complete. However, fields in the sample database, such as the sample stratigraphy, are largely incomplete because, at the time the data were acquired, the stratigraphy at each station was formally undefined. The most effective way of presenting and investigating the data is via GIS.

  • This layer of the GeoIndex shows the location of available 1:25000 scale digital geological maps within Great Britain. The Digital Geological Map of Great Britain project (DiGMapGB) has prepared 1:625 000, 1:250 000 and 1:50 000 scale datasets for England, Wales and Scotland. The datasets themselves are available as vector data in a variety of formats in which they are structured into themes primarily for use in geographical information systems (GIS) where they can be integrated with other types of spatial data for analysis and problem solving in many earth-science-related issues. The DiGMapGB-10 dataset is as yet incomplete, current work is concentrated on extending the geographical cover, especially to cover high priority urban areas.

  • A series of maps at the detailed scale of 1:25 000 have been produced for areas of outstanding geological interest in Great Britain. Some maps are accompanied by explanatory booklets. The maps were published between 1954 and 2007. About 60 maps have been published, some showing solid geology, some drift geology and some combined solid and drift. Most of the maps include geological cross sections and generalised vertical sections. Geological maps represent a geologist's compiled interpretation of the geology of an area. A geologist will consider the data available at the time, including measurements and observations collected during field campaigns, as well as their knowledge of geological processes and the geological context to create a model of the geology of an area. This model is then fitted to a topographic basemap and drawn up at the appropriate scale, with generalization if necessary, to create a geological map, which is a representation of the geological model. Explanatory notes and vertical and horizontal cross sections may be published with the map. Geological maps may be created to show various aspects of the geology, or themes. These maps are hard-copy paper records stored in the National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) and are delivered as digital scans through the BGS website.

  • The UTM series of maps are based on 1:250 000 base maps published by the Ordnance Survey. Mapping is divided into squares which cover 1 degree by 1 degree of latitude / longitude in the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection, and coverage extends offshore and onto the continental shelf. The UTM series are available in three different themes: - Solid geology (complete coverage within the mapped area, including most of the UK continental shelf) - Sea bed sediments (coverage for most offshore areas) - Quaternary geology (coverage for the UK sector of the North Sea, Irish Sea and the Atlantic margin) Also included within this series are two small-scale (1:500 000) bedrock geology maps of the Central Rockall Basin and North Rockall Basin. These maps supersede the older quarter-inch series of maps which were published for England / Wales and Scotland. Geological maps represent a geologist's compiled interpretation of the geology of an area. A geologist will consider the data available at the time, including measurements and observations collected during field campaigns, as well as their knowledge of geological processes and the geological context to create a model of the geology of an area. This model is then fitted to a topographic basemap and drawn up at the appropriate scale, with generalization if necessary, to create a geological map, which is a representation of the geological model. Explanatory notes and vertical and horizontal cross sections may be published with the map. These maps are, for the most part, hard-copy paper records stored in the National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) and are delivered as digital scans through the BGS website.

  • For much of the Geological Survey's existence, the County Series of maps were the standard large-scale maps on which geological mapping was undertaken. These maps are based on the Ordnance Survey County (or six-inch to the mile) series of maps. These maps were cut up to be used in the field to record geological observations, and on return to the office, the geology was transferred to a complete County Series map, which after approval was known as a 'standard' (England / Wales) or 'clean copy' (Scotland). This dataset contains the 'standard' or 'clean copy' County Series maps held by BGS. Geological maps represent a geologist's compiled interpretation of the geology of an area. A geologist will consider the data available at the time, including measurements and observations collected during field campaigns, as well as their knowledge of geological processes and the geological context to create a model of the geology of an area. This model is then fitted to a topographic basemap and drawn up at the appropriate scale, with generalization if necessary, to create a geological map, which is a representation of the geological model. Explanatory notes and vertical and horizontal cross sections may be published with the map. Geological maps may be created to show various aspects of the geology, or themes. The most common map themes held by BGS are solid (later referred to as bedrock) and drift (later referred to as superficial). These maps are hard-copy paper records stored in the National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) and are delivered as digital scans through the BGS website.

  • Annotated Scottish 1 inch scale maps. Printed topography with hand annotated fossil locations and geology with hand drawn cross sections, colour-wash with index and observations. Considered working material towards published geological maps.

  • The British Geological Survey (BGS) holds an archive of multibeam backscatter data from BGS, Maritime & Coastguard Agency (MCA) and other organisations. The data are stored within the National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) and the Marine Environmental Data and Information Network (MEDIN) Data Archive Centre (DAC) for Geology and Geophysics. BGS works with the partner DAC for bathymetry at the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO) to archive backscatter data. The majority of the data were collected and processed for the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) under the Civil Hydrography Programme (CHP). Backscatter data is useful for seabed characterisation for geological and habitat mapping. View the backscatter image layer and download backscatter data (geotiff) via the BGS Offshore GeoIndex www.bgs.ac.uk/GeoIndex/offshore.htm. The data underlying the images are available on request enquiries@bgs.ac.uk. If further backscatter processing is required, BGS can provide a quote. View and download the related bathymetry data via the UKHO INSPIRE portal https://www.gov.uk/guidance/inspire-portal-and-medin-bathymetry-data-archive-centre.