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  • This dataset contains output from the TMPA (TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation) Algorithm, and provides precipitation estimates in the TRMM regions that have the (nearly-zero) bias of the ”TRMM Combined Instrument” precipitation estimate and the dense sampling of high-quality microwave data with fill-in using microwave-calibrated infrared estimates. The granule size is 3 hours. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) was a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration (JAXA) Agency to study rainfall for weather and climate research.

  • This dataset contains Global Precipitation Measurements (GPM) Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals (IMERG) v5 and v6. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow.

  • This dataset contains Global Precipitation Measurements (GPM) Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals (IMERG) v6. The precipitation estimates from the various precipitation-relevant satellite passive microwave (PMW) sensors comprising the GPM constellation are computed using the 2017 version of the Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF2017), then gridded, intercalibrated to the GPM Combined Ku Radar-Radiometer Algorithm (CORRA) product, and merged into half-hourly 0.1°x0.1° (roughly 10x10 km) fields. Level 3 data are averaged global gridded products, screened for bad data points The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow.

  • This dataset contains Global Precipitation Measurements (GPM) Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals (IMERG) v5. The Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) is the unified U.S. algorithm that provides the Day-1 multi-satellite precipitation product. The precipitation estimates from the various precipitation-relevant satellite passive microwave (PMW) sensors comprising the GPM constellation are computed using the 2014 version of the Goddard Profiling Algorithm (GPROF2014), then gridded, intercalibrated to the GPM Combined Instrument product, and combined into half-hourly 10x10 km fields. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow.

  • The Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) aimed to study chemical composition and physical parameters in the Antarctic during the development of the Antarctic Ozone Hole in August and September 1987. The data is primarily that collected onboard the NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft, along with ozonesonde data collected at four Antarctic stations: Halley Bay, McMurdo, Palmer Station, and the South Pole. The experiment tested the chemical and dynamical theories of the ozone hole using the aircraft data in theoretical computer models of the chemistry and dynamics of the stratosphere. The data include atmospheric composition, meteorological parameters, aerosol data and cloud data. The DC-8 aircraft flew at the lowermost extremities of the hole and deployed a combination of remote sounding of the overlying atmosphere with some in situ sampling. Vertical distributions of ozone and aerosols above the cruising altitude of the aircraft and within the hole were mapped. The DC-8 collected ozone and aerosol profiles overhead by LIDAR; and measured ozone, bromine oxide, OClO, nitrogen dioxide, nitric acid, and hydrogen chloride. In situ methods yielded ozone, total water, and whole air sampling.

  • The objective of the Greenhouse Effect Detection Experiment (GEDEX) was to assemble and document existing data for the analysis of global climate change and to distribute these data to promote further research.Data from GEDEX comprises of a collection of 60+ global climate change datasets assembled on a NASA CD-ROM. Data include surface, upper air and satellite measurements of temperature, solar irradiance, clouds, greenhouse gases, fluxes, albedos, ozone and water vapour plus Southern Oscillation indices and QBO statistics. Specific datasets include the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE I and II), the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS), Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer (VISSR) and the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). Resolution and timespan varies with dataset. This dataset is public.

  • This dataset consists of combined data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instruments on the Earth Radiaition Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the 10th NOAA Sun-synchronous operational satellites (NOAA-9). ERBS was launched in October 1984 by the Space Shuttle Challenger (STS-41G) into an orbit at 603-km altitude, 57-deg. inclination. NOAA-10 operated at an altitude of 833-km, with an equatorial crossing local time of 0730, having been launched in November 1986. The ERBE instrument's main aim was to provide accurate measurements of incoming solar energy and shortwave and longwave radiation reflected or emitted from the Earth back into space. This dataset contains colour images (shortwave/longwave/net radiation, albedo, clear-sky albedo, clear-sky shortwave/longwave/net radiation, and shortwave/longwave/net cloud forcing) from scanning radiometers on the NOAA-10 ERBE satellites and for combined satellite cases. Monthly average values are included for the time periods during which the scanners were operational.

  • The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) is an instrument built and operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The instrument uses backscattered ultraviolet radiance to infer total column ozone measurements. The data consists of daily gridded averages of total ozone covering the entire globe. The original Nimbus-7 TOMS operated from November 1978 until May 1993. Meteor-3 TOMS was launched in August 1991 and operated until December 1994. These CDs contain the total ozone and UV radiance data.

  • This data was collected from the Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange Project (STEP) conducted onboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft in January and February, 1987 based in Darwin, Australia. This mission was the last of 6 STEP missions which began with the Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) in April 1984. The Darwin, Australia phase of STEP utilized 15 instruments and accessed the world's highest, coldest tropopause as well as the largest penetrating cumulonimbus anvils. The flights were designed to test a dehydration mechanism proposed by Danielsen (1982), as well as to acquire sufficient data to test and develop other hypotheses. The STEP missions were designed to investigate different aspects of stratosphere-troposphere exchange (in mass, trace gases, and aerosols), including cloud-free and cloud-dominated mechanisms in both the mid-latitudes and the tropics. STEP was carried out under NASA and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Data from the NASA/NOAA aircraft campaign based in Darwin, Australia in January and February 1987. Designed to investigate mechanisms of equatorial stratosphere-troposphere exchange. Measurements include trace gases and aerosol in cloud free and cloud dominated conditions. This dataset is public.

  • This dataset collection contains data from the Stratospheric Photochemistry, Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE) which was based at NASA Ames Research Center in California during portions of 1992 and 1993. The data consist of measurements collected onboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft, and selected radiosonde soundings from stations in the region of the experiment. Flights were conducted during October and November of 1992, April and May of 1993, and October of 1993. Theory team products come in two forms: as quantities evaluated along flight tracks and as global or hemispheric fields. Meteorological quantities, such as temperature, geopotential, and potential vorticity are available in both forms. They are based on analyses from both the U.S. National Meteorological Center and from the Assimilation Model of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Other quantities, available along flight tracks only, include visible reflectivity, cloud height, UV reflectivity, and total ozone. The first two are derived from GOES imagery, the last two from the Meteor TOMS sensor. Finally, calculations of mixing ratios of selected chemical species using a photochemical steady state model are available along the flight track.