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University of Glasgow

15 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 15
  • Aquatic carbon (dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon and the carbon isotopic composition of DIC) and nutrients (calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, total soluble phosphorus and silica) in rainfall fractions (rainwater, throughfall, stemflow and overland flow) were sampled in the Western Amazonian basin. The samples were collected towards the end of a wet season April - May 2012. Rainfall and throughfall samples were collected in plastic buckets. Stemflow samples were collected using stemflow collection systems. Overland samples were collected using a a plastic pipe cut lengthways directing flow into a plastic bucket. Established standard methods were used to analyse the DIC, DOC and nutrients. These methods are outlined in the lineage. The samples were taken to understand the nutrient and carbon delivery in rainwater as well as leaching from tree canopies, stems and from the soil surface. The data collection was carried out as part of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) funded Amazonica project (NE/F005482/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/59bdb8f6-fb1f-418f-a53c-394f6c68a334

  • Survey data on knowledge exchange experience of both Chinese and British scientists working on critical zone and more broadly on geoscience. Data are drawn from questionnaire surveys to explore the knowledge management methods used in their environmental research. Data are anonymised social survey data from questionnaires. The data were generated during the NERC grant 'The transmissive critical zone: understanding the karst hydrology-biogeochemical interface for sustainable management' reference NE/N007425/1 undertaken as part of the NERC Using Critical Zone Science to Understand Sustaining the Ecosystem Service of Soil & Water (CZO) programme Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/71fc5250-727b-42ec-85ba-a45770e464b1

  • The dataset contains CO2 efflux, hydraulic and water chemistry data from six field sites which vary in location, size and catchment characteristics. Measurements were made at: i) two sites in the UK - the River Kelvin (335 km2, semi-urban catchment) and Drumtee water (9.6 km2, peat dominated catchment); ii) four sites in the Peruvian Amazon - Main Trail (5 km2, seasonally active stream in a rainforest catchment), New Colpita stream (7 km2, perennial stream in a rainforest catchment), La Torre river (2000 km2, rainforest catchment) and Tambopata river (14 000 km2, rainforest catchment with some small scale agriculture and gold mining). CO2 efflux was measured at all sites on each sampling occasion alongside a range of other parameters to enable investigation into the controls on CO2 efflux. Parameters measured include flow velocity and water depth (from which other hydraulic parameters can be calculated), DIC concentration and pH (from which pCO2 can be calculated) and water temperature. Sampling was carried out over several years, thus capturing a range of seasons and flow conditions, and at all sites, measurement locations were chosen to ensure that a range of flow intensities were included. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/02d5cea7-10aa-4591-938a-a41e1c5bc207

  • Data from literature search systematically conducted using two widely-used academic databases: Web of Science™ (WoS) and Scopus . Data include the annual amount of KM publication in China and across the world, in WoS, the total amount of knowledge management (KM) publication during the searched years for each country (top 20), in Scopus, the total amount of KM publication during the searched years for each country (top 20), information about the retained KM publication for environmental management in China. The data were generated during the NERC grant 'The transmissive critical zone: understanding the karst hydrology-biogeochemical interface for sustainable management' reference NE/N007425/1 undertaken as part of the NERC Using Critical Zone Science to Understand Sustaining the Ecosystem Service of Soil & Water (CZO) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/9bbcbd03-0b6d-409d-9ad1-650c25f5ac73

  • The data are concentrations of different fluvial carbon species (dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and particulate organic carbon) which form part of the lateral transport of carbon from the terrestrial to aquatic system. This influences the terrestrial carbon balance as well as being a key part of the freshwater carbon cycle. The submission also contains hydrological (stage height, discharge and water temperature) and water chemistry data (pH, conductivity and oxygen saturation). The data were collected from Peruvian rainforest streams within the NERC funded Amazonica project (NE/F005482/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/507a5e1f-e056-454c-8ff6-d185f3da8556

  • Data from two small streams, two rivers and rainfall fractions in the Western Amazonian basin at Tambopata National Reserve in Madre de Dios region, Peru. Data presented are nutrients (calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, total soluble phosphorus and silica) and fluvial carbon - dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its isotopic composition δ13C-DIC, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC). Samples were collected during the period from February 2011 to May 2012 targeting both wet and dry seasons. Samples for DIC samples were collected using pre-acidified evacuated Exetainers. Established standard methods were used to take samples for DOC and nutrients. Established standard methods were used to analyse samples for DIC, DOC and nutrients These methods are outlined in the lineage. The samples were taken to understand the hydrological controls on the carbon concentrations and fluxes during different flow conditions. The data collection was carried out as part of the Natural Environment Research Council funded Amazonica project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ee1b9eb7-6fbd-4dd5-8f8f-e07d32c057e4

  • 3 datasets comprising of electron holograms acquired during in situ heating of a magnetite particle within a transmission electron microscope. Details of the experimental acquisition of the electron holograms can be found in the publications: Almeida, T. P., Muxworthy, A. R., Kovács, A., Williams, W., Brown, P. D., and Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. (2016) Direct visualization of the thermomagnetic behavior of pseudo-single-domain magnetite particles. Science Advances, 2(4), e1501801 & Almeida, T. P., Muxworthy, A. R., Kovács, A., Williams, W., Nagy, L., Ó Conbhuí, P., Frandsen, C., Supakulopas, R., Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. (2016): Direct observation of the thermal demagnetization of a vortex structure held by a non-ideal magnetite recorder. Geophysical Research Letters, 42, DOI: 10.1002/2016GL070074.

  • Data from a field-based investigation into the spatio-temporal variability of abiotic and biotic controls on peatland carbon cycling. Data was collected between February 2011 and April 2013, across an area of blanket bog peatland at Black Law Wind Farm, Lanarkshire, Scotland. Plant-soil properties data includes total carbon content, total nitrogen content and carbon to nitrogen ratio of vegetation, litter and peat, carbon and nitrogen stock for litter and peat, bulk density, soil moisture content, pH and soil microbial community composition of peat (Phospholipid Fatty Acids). Peatland carbon cycling data includes measures of litter decomposition, dissolved organic carbon concentration, methane fluxes, net ecosystem exchange, photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration. Physical parameters measured includes below ground temperature from April 2011 to June 2012 and soil moisture content from May 2011 to April 2013. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/99416ba1-b670-4a82-8225-9644293fb4de

  • Mosquito trap data from Kilombero Valley in Tanzania - a global hotspot for malaria. Since 2007, field entomologists working at Ifakara Health Institue (IHI) and at the University of Glasgow have been trapping and collecting primary malaria vectors for four villages in the Kilombero Valley: Lupiro, Kidugalo, Minepa and Sagamaganga. Trapped mosquitoes were identified to species level (Anopheles gambiae and A funestus), their sex recorded (male or female) and their abdominal status (fed or unfed) noted. When available, the daily mosquito data was consistently linked to micro climate data logger data (weather conditions on site, including averaged, minimum and maximum daytime and night time values for temperature, humidity and vapour pressure deficit). This long record allows exploring the relationship between malaria vector dynamics and related environmental conditions. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/89406b06-d0aa-4120-84db-a5f91b616053

  • This dataset contains details of the seasonal abundance of each of the life stages of the mosquito species, Culex pipiens, at a field site located at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology in Wallingford. Immature life stages (eggs, larvae and pupae) were monitored three times per week from March until October 2015, whilst adult counts were taken four times per week from April until October in the same year. Immature Cx. pipiens were monitored using 450 litre circular water butts, sampled using a standard dipping procedure. Adults were monitored using light traps. The adult data also includes counts for mosquito species Culiseta annulata and Aedes geniculatus. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/34d6f9e8-8dbd-42f7-9108-f1b21960d35e