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The University of Edinburgh

14 record(s)

 

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  • The dataset describes the results of a laboratory analysis investigating the presence of various infectious agents in goats, cattle, pigs, dogs and sheep from Mambwe District, Eastern Province, Zambia. Blood samples were collected in June, July and August 2013 and stored on Whatman FTA (Flinders Technology Associates) cards. Laboratory analysis was conducted using polymerase chain reactions (PCR) for African trypanosomes and tick-borne infections. In addition, serum was tested for Brucella using the Rose Bengal test. Cattle and dogs were tested for African trypanosomes, tick-borne infections and Brucella. Goats and sheep were tested for African trypanosomes and Brucella. Pigs were tested for African trypanosomes only. The objective was to evaluate the health status of domestic animals in the Mambwe District. This work was conducted alongside a human wellbeing questionnaire survey. The research was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC). The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f81ede76-a1d4-4367-aa8c-de087350457e

  • This dataset contains the results of 211 household surveys conducted in Mambwe District, Zambia, as part of a wider study looking at human and animal trypanosomiasis and changing settlement patterns in the area. The interviews were conducted from June 2013 to August 2013. The objective of the survey was to set the health of people and their animals in the context of overall household wellbeing, assets and access to resources. The topics covered included household demographics, human and animal health, access to and use of medical and veterinary services, livestock and dog demographics, livestock production, human and animal contacts with wildlife, crop and especially cotton production, migration, access to water and fuel use, household assets and poverty, resilience and values. The dataset has been anonymised by removing names of respondents, Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) location of their homes and names of interviewers. Household numbers were retained. Written consent was obtained prior to commencing all interviews. This research was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC), and these data contributed to the research carried out by the consortium. The research was funded by NERC with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b1647138-49f5-4777-a39d-e7359bf7b98d

  • This data set describes the prevalence of trypanosomes and Sodalis glossinidius, and host blood meal analysis from tsetse flies (Glossina morsitans morsitans) captured during two intensive surveys in Mambwe District, Eastern Province, Zambia in 2013. The Luangwa Valley in Zambia is an old focus of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense) and sporadic outbreaks have continued to occur in the human population. In recent years there has been an influx of people migrating from the densely populated plateau region resulting in a significant change in land-use in the study area, potentially influencing tsetse dynamics and the epidemiology of HAT. This data set was collected to monitor infection rates of trypanosomes and Sodalis glossinidius in Glossina morsitans morsitans tsetse flies in the area so as to assess the risk posed to both human and livestock populations. In addition, feeding patterns of tsetse were investigated through analysis of blood meals. This work was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC) and contributed to the Zambia trypanosomiasis case study. The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a55eea77-8401-49ba-921e-53e085dc8345

  • The data set includes the results of a laboratory analysis in 2016, investigating the presence of trypanosomes and prevalence of tsetse endosymbionts in tsetse flies. The tsetse flies were sampled in Hurungwe District, Mashonaland West Province, Zimbabwe, from February 2014 to November 2014. Flies were sampled using a combination of Epsilon traps and fly rounds, both established techniques for sampling tsetse. Tsetse were stored prior to laboratory analysis using Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques in 2016. The data include two species of tsetse, Glossina pallidipes and Glossina morsitans morsitans. Trypanosome species investigated include Trypanosoma brucei s.l., T. b. rhodesiense, T. vivax, T. congolense, T. simiae, T.simiae (Tsavo) and T. godfreyi. Endosymbionts included in the study were Sodalis glossinidius and Wolbachia spp. Hurungwe District is the only sleeping sickness focus in Zimbabwe and an increase in cases had been detected in years preceding this study. The objective of the study was to investigate the trypanosome species present in the tsetse population and their association with tsetse endosymbionts. This study was conducted as part of research into the relationship between trypanosomiasis, well-being and ecosystems by the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC). The research was funded by NERC with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1e435dd3-ed93-4961-a136-ffa477731e1c

  • This resource contains tsetse fly count data recorded during two intensive surveys in Mambwe District, Eastern Province, Zambia in 2013. Tsetse sampling was conducted along a 60 kilometre transect from the plateau region on the eastern side of the Luangwa Valley to the floor of the valley, near Mfuwe Airport. Tsetse flies were sampled using black screen fly rounds. The first survey was conducted in May and June (cold, dry season) and the second survey in November (hot dry season). The Luangwa Valley in Zambia is an old focus of human sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense) and sporadic outbreaks have occurred in the human population. In recent years there has been an influx of people migrating from the densely populated plateau region resulting in a significant change in land-use in the study area, potentially influencing the distribution and density of tsetse. This work was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC) and contributed to the Zambia trypanosomiasis case study. The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/59fc6e1a-e1cb-4bcf-8b49-68211b2a363a

  • These data consist of information on economic, social, demographic, cultural, and treatment seeking behaviour collected from former and current human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) patients in Eastern Zambia between 2004 and 2014. There are two data sets. The first dataset consists information on the economic and social impact of HAT. Information on demographics, culture, and treatment seeking behaviour was also collected. Data for this dataset were collected through structured questionnaires administered to patients themselves or their close relatives (care giver). The questionnaires were developed and delivered by experienced researchers from the University of Zambia. The data have been anonymised by removing the names of villages where the patients lived. In total, 64 cases were included in the study. Verbal consent was obtained prior to commencing all questionnaires. The second dataset consists of anonymised transcripts of focus group discussions conducted with health workers, people who have suffered from HAT and their relatives or friends. Seven to ten people were included per discussion group, providing information on concepts, perceptions and ideas relating to the social consequences of HAT. A total of eight focus group discussions were conducted during the study. Focus group discussion data were analysed using inductive approaches and thematic coding carried out by two independent researchers. All transcripts were anonymised and personal identifiers were removed to protect patients' individual data. Verbal consent was obtained prior to commencing all interviews. Focus group interviews were carried out by experienced researchers from the University of Zambia. The data were collected to determine the economic and social consequences of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) in Eastern Zambia. This research was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC), and these data contributed to the research carried out by the consortium. The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6f70d562-8fcf-4ecd-adaf-cbc5800cc326

  • This resource contains anonymised interviews with community members in Chundu Ward, Hurungwe District, Zimbabwe, conducted to further our understanding of how the local community interacts with tsetse. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with key informants in 2012 to 2013 to investigate livelihood strategies including hunting, livestock keeping and cultivation, and how they influenced the risk of contracting trypanosomiasis. Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) occurs sporadically within the Zambezi Valley in Zimbabwe and is transmitted by the tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina pallidipes). African animal trypanosomiasis (AAT) is more prevalent and places significant constraints on livestock keeping. Approaches taken by local people to control or manage the disease were also investigated during the interviews. This research was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC) and these interviews contributed to this consortium. The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J000701/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f712c52f-1ce9-4603-bc33-685221a14f50

  • This resource contains anonymised policy interviews on trypanosomiasis in Zambia from 2013 conducted by Catherine Grant (Institute of Development Studies) and Noreen Machila (University of Zambia, Department of Disease Control). These interviews explore the differing opinions of various stakeholders in relation to trypanosomiasis, a widespread and potentially fatal disease spread by tsetse flies which affects both humans and animals. It is an important time to examine this issue as human population growth and other factors have led to migration into new areas which are populated by tsetse flies and this may affect disease levels. This means that there is a greater risk to people and their livestock. Opinions on the best way to manage the disease are deeply divided (Source: Author Summary- Grant, C, Anderson, N and Machila, N [Accepted] Stakeholder narratives on trypanosomiasis, their effect on policy and the scope for One Health, Public Library of Science Neglected Tropical Diseases (PLOS NTD). This was part of a wider research project, the Dynamic Drivers of Disease in Africa Consortium (DDDAC) and these interviews contributed to this consortium. The research was funded by NERC project no NE/J001570/1 with support from the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation Programme (ESPA). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/727c1c4e-e097-44a4-abc7-74a4cc9acbfc

  • Data comprise causal diagrams which show links between aspects that influence the well-being of rural inhabitants (e.g. good quality of food, good family relationships, education, etc) with ecosystem services (e.g. food from trees, wood sticks for construction, firewood, wood for charcoal production, etc.) and their causes (e.g. change in land use) in rural Mozambique. Information was gathered at 20 workshops held in Maputo, Xai Xai, Lichinga, Quelimane, and at village level in the districts of Mabalane, Marrupa and Gurue in 2014 and 2015. The objective of the workshops was to examine aspects that influence well-being and their causes in the miombo woodland area of rural Mozambique. One of the objectives of the project was to construct Bayesian belief networks (BBNs) to model future land use change scenarios in rural Mozambique using a participatory approach, to evaluate the consequences of deforestation in the well-being of the rural population. The data were collected as part of the Abrupt Changes in Ecosystem Services and Wellbeing in Mozambican Woodlands (ACES) project and were funded by the Ecosystem Services for Poverty Alleviation (ESPA) programme, funded by NERC, the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Department for International Development (DfID), the three are government organizations from UK. The project was led by the University of Edinburgh, with the collaboration of the Universidad Mondlane, the IIED, and other organizations. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/14622c4b-8bd4-4624-8ea6-35da7da211cd

  • Data from an investigation of the effects of biochar application to soil on greenhouse gas emissions using soil from a bioenergy crop (Miscanthus X. giganteus). Data include physical (bulk density) and chemical analyses of the soil (total carbon (C) and nitrogen (N), extractable ammonium and nitrate), and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O)) during incubations. Data were collected during two incubation experiments investigating the effects of temperature, soil moisture and soil aeration on biochar induced suppression of GHG emissions. Biochar is a carbon rich substances which is being advocated as a climate mitigation tool to increase carbon sequestration and reduce nitrous oxide emissions. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2757e972-a7fe-494d-92c3-c3205dfdef19