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Lancaster University

36 record(s)

 

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  • This dataset comprises of derived annual statistics for measures of rainfall, streamflow, temperature and stream acidity (pH) for a stream, draining a small, approximately 0.6 square kilometres, upland grassland catchment. The stream, Nant Esgair Garn, drains into the Llyn Brianne reservoir, Powys, United Kingdom. The data are for a 31 year period covering 1st April 1982 to 1st April 2012. The streamflow and acidity data are derived from 15 minute resolution observations throughout the calendar year 2013 from associated stream gauging and water quality stations on the Nant Esgair Garn. The monthly rainfall measures presented, were derived from local rain gauges. The monthly temperature measures presented were derived from observations at a weather station near Talgarth, Powys. Routines within the Lancaster University Computer-Aided Program for Time-series Analysis and Identification of Noisy Systems (CAPTAIN) Toolbox for Matlab were used to develop a dynamic model of these data. These models were then used to simulate the 31-year record for which monthly statistics were derived. The statistics were derived to develop greater understanding of the controls on the long-term dynamics of aquatic biodiversity observed by other researchers in this stream. The work was part of the Diversity in Upland River Ecosystem Service Sustainability (DURESS) project, NERC grant NE/J014826/1. Members of staff from the Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University installed, maintained and downloaded the stream gauging and water quality stations and also carried out statistical analysis of the data. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/00185590-537e-40e4-969c-039f44b4dad9

  • This dataset comprises of derived annual statistics for measures of rainfall, streamflow, temperature and stream acidity (pH) for a stream, draining a small, approximately 1.2 square kilometres, upland conifer catchment. The stream, Nant Trawsnant, drains into the Llyn Brianne reservoir, Powys, United Kingdom. The data are for a 31 year period covering 1st April 1982 to 1st April 2012. The streamflow and acidity data are derived from 15 minute resolution observations throughout the calendar year 2013 from associated stream gauging and water quality stations on the Nant Trawsnant. The monthly rainfall measures presented, were derived from local rain gauges. The monthly temperature measures presented were derived from observations at a weather station near Talgarth, Powys. Routines within the Lancaster University Computer-Aided Program for Time-series Analysis and Identification of Noisy Systems (CAPTAIN) Toolbox for Matlab were used to develop a dynamic model of these data. These models were then used to simulate the 31-year record for which monthly statistics were derived. The statistics were derived to develop greater understanding of the controls on the long-term dynamics of aquatic biodiversity observed by other researchers in this stream. The work was part of the Diversity in Upland River Ecosystem Service Sustainability (DURESS) project, NERC grant NE/J014826/1. Members of staff from the Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University installed, maintained and downloaded the stream gauging and water quality stations and also carried out statistical analysis of the data. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b085a784-0e16-4174-b208-465a8f43c8c8

  • [This dataset is embargoed until February 23, 2021]. This dataset includes measurements of stem respiration in 20 plots (250 x 10 m each) in the Brazilian Amazon. Study plots were distributed across a gradient of forest disturbance, including: undisturbed primary forests , logged primary forests, logged-and-burned primary forests, and secondary forests. Data were collected from June 2015 until July 2018. In December 2015, during the El Niño-mediated drought, eight of our study plots were affected by understory fires. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4826f7c3-d6f2-47e5-8dda-c084e54720f6

  • [This dataset is embargoed until January 22, 2021]. This dataset includes measurements of soil respiration in 20 plots (250 x 10 m each) in the Brazilian Amazon. Study plots were distributed across a gradient of forest disturbance, including: undisturbed primary forests , logged primary forests, logged-and-burned primary forests, and secondary forests. Data were collected from January 2015 until November 2017. In December 2015, during the El Niño-mediated drought, eight of our study plots were affected by understory fires. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e5f361b3-b434-4d11-9407-e5f48fe442b0

  • [This dataset is embargoed until January 24, 2021]. This dataset includes measurements of litter in 20 plots (250 x 10 m each) in the Brazilian Amazon. Study plots were distributed across a gradient of forest disturbance, including: undisturbed primary forests , logged primary forests, logged-and-burned primary forests, and secondary forests. Data were collected from January 2015 until October 2018. In December 2015, during the El Niño-mediated drought, eight of our study plots were affected by understory fires. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d01084b2-c3b1-4187-b2e7-b0827c738855

  • [This dataset is embargoed until January 24, 2021]. This dataset includes measurements of stem radial growth in 20 plots (250 x 10 m each) in the Brazilian Amazon. Study plots were distributed across a gradient of forest disturbance, including: undisturbed primary forests , logged primary forests, logged-and-burned primary forests, and secondary forests. Data were collected from December 2014 until October 2018. In December 2015, during the El Niño-mediated drought, eight of our study plots were affected by understory fires. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c8bc6982-d4de-4e6f-aadb-08aac877b263

  • [This dataset is embargoed until January 24, 2021]. This dataset includes measurements of soil respiration in 20 plots (250 x 10 m each) in the Brazilian Amazon. Study plots were distributed across a gradient of forest disturbance, including: undisturbed primary forests , logged primary forests, logged-and-burned primary forests, and secondary forests. Data were collected from October 2014 until May 2018. In December 2015, during the El Niño-mediated drought, eight of our study plots were affected by understory fires. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/def51d3d-d653-40ca-8231-a238b0c66975

  • Data comprises patterns of diversity in a below-ground community of microarthropods (mites and collembola), measured during a nutrient (calcium and nitrogen) manipulation experiment, located at the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Soil Biodiversity Site in Sourhope, Scotland, UK. Data collected include abundance of microarthropods, and also microbial biomass carbon, soil respiration, wet pH using de-ionised water, soil loss on ignition, dry root biomass, total carbon and nitrogen content of soil and roots and soil moisture content. The data were collected as a component of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme, established in 1999 and centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute)'s farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders. During this time, the site was monitored to assess changes in aboveground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/fe2ba292-08b0-428c-8e27-8c851a4a8bbc

  • Vegetation species and soil data from a large national survey of calcareous grasslands, carried out in Great Britain in 1990-1993 (referred to as 1990) and 2006-2009 (referred to as 2007). Up to 128 12x12m plots were surveyed from across the country, selected on the basis of being representative of the calcareous grassland type. Details about plant species and soils were collected using standardized survey methods. The 1990 survey was completed under a contract from the Department of the Environment, by Lancaster University. The repeat survey in 2007 was completed under a NERC Grant by staff from Lancaster University, York University, Radboud University, Countryside Commission for Wales, National Museum Wales and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/38a73c7b-3e3c-4517-a33f-bd28b292b9e1

  • Data collected include: plant (shoot and root) biomass, a range of soil conditions including mycorrhizal abundance, microbial biomass carbon & nitrogen, soil extractable ammonia, soil extractable nitrate, soil extractable phosphate, total nitrogen content of soil and the presence of selected mite and collembolan species, and measurements associated with stable isotopes (ratio of isotopes of nitrogen in soil, roots and shoots, total carbon content of roots and shoots, ratio of isotopes of carbon in roots, total nitrogen content of fumigated and non-fumigated acid traps, ratio of isotopes of nitrogen in fumigated and non-fumigated acid traps). These data were collected from a laboratory-based study that examined a range of soil properties to investigate the relationship between microarthropods and soil microbial properties and the short-term partitioning of a dual-labelled organic nitrogen source (glycine-2-13C-15N) between a grassland plant, Agrostis capillaris, and the soil microbial biomass, to determine how soil fauna and their diversity influence plant-microbial competition for organic N. The experiment was carried out at Lancaster University using soil from the NERC Soil Biodiversity site in Scotland. The work was part of the NERC Soil Biodiversity Thematic Programme, which was established in 1999 and was centred upon the intensive study of a large field experiment located at the Macaulay Land Use Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute) farm at Sourhope in the Scottish Borders. During the programme, the site was monitored to assess changes in above-ground biomass production (productivity), species composition and relative abundance (diversity). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e3c79781-09af-4c4f-b6ad-b0bc323e203f