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  • Stratigraphic and ecological data from tidal marsh sites in south-central Chile. Includes stratigraphy, diatom assemblages and radiocarbon dates from fossil cores and diatom assemblages from modern tidal marsh samples. Data were collected to provide evidence for multiple great earthquakes in south-central Chile, and enable the reconstruction of vertical land-level changes associated with these earthquakes. Data are from tidal marsh sites within the 1960 earthquake rupture area along the Chilean subduction zone (37.5 - 46 degrees South).

  • The dataset consists of the transcripts of expert inputs considering how the conceptual thinking for both ‘smart’ and ‘natural or biophilic’ cities could combine to inform future urban discourses and critically reviewed a set of emerging characteristics that described the interface between these alternative discourses. These inputs include informed practice-based perspectives on themes identified in the literature and comparative assessments, testing the integrating principles identified in the research against business as usual silo approaches, which helped refine the research outcomes. Expert inputs were used to inform the identification of new ways of integrating urban futures discourses, in particular shaping the Smart City – Natural City interface, using Birmingham, UK as a case study. The files include the underlying data provided by a cohort of multi-disciplinary [anonymised] experts who contributed to the research; • the record of the group or table outputs from the Innovation Workshop of 12th September 2017 • copies of photographs of the collective ‘stickies’ contributions at the workshop • the original transcript record of the semi-structured interview conversations • records of Group telephone or meeting conversations • ‘work in progress’ collations of comments received; generated to share with contributors and with co-authors Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/474e090d-4502-432c-b8de-ce9f33571f8e

  • The dataset includes data on vegetation composition, flower counts, berry availability over winter, pollinator visitation rates, invertebrate, hedge structure and hedgerow regrowth from a set of long running hedgerow experiments. There were three experiments in total. Experiment 1 was based in Monks Wood, Cambridgeshire, and was used to investigate the long-term effects of timing and frequency of cutting on resource provision for wildlife. Experiment 2 was based at 5 sites across Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Devon and was used to investigate the effect of timing, intensity and frequency of hedgerow cutting. Experiment 3 was based at 5 sites across Cambridgeshire, Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire and was used to investigate the effects of different rejuvenation techniques on hedgerows. All three experiments were randomised plot experiments (full details of plots and their treatments can be found in the supporting documentation. The majority of the data was collected between 2010 and 2016 but for one experiment there is data from 2005. The long running hedgerow experiments had two linked aims focused on management to maintain and restore the hedgerow resource under the agri-environment schemes: • to examine the effects of simple cutting management regimes promoted by Entry Level Stewardship (ELS) and Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) on the quality and quantity of wildlife habitat, and food resources in hedgerows; and • to identify, develop and test low-cost, practical options for hedgerow restoration and rejuvenation applicable at the large-scale under both ELS and HLS. This research was funded by Defra (project number BD2114: Effects of hedgerow management and restoration on biodiversity) and managed by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/95259623-f0b6-4328-a0e3-4aec09ede5b5